News / USA

Reports: Republicans Softening on Debt Limit Stance

As the federal government shutdown continues, Tory Anderson, right, with her kids Audrey, 7, and Kai, 3, of Goodyear, Ariz., join others as they rally for the Alliance of Retired Americans to end the shutdown, Oct. 9, 2013.
As the federal government shutdown continues, Tory Anderson, right, with her kids Audrey, 7, and Kai, 3, of Goodyear, Ariz., join others as they rally for the Alliance of Retired Americans to end the shutdown, Oct. 9, 2013.
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VOA News
U.S. news outlets say congressional Republicans are considering a proposal to temporarily extend the government's borrowing authority in order to end a stalemate with President Barack Obama and avoid a potential default.

House Republicans are scheduled to discuss the issue early Thursday, hours before a small group will hold talks with Obama at the White House. The president invited all 232 House Republicans, but Speaker John Boehner is sending just 18 of his members, and only those with leadership posts.

Meanwhile, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew will testify before a Senate committee Thursday about the need to raise the government's $16.7 trillion debt limit by October 17, the date the administration says it will run out of money to pay all of its bills, which would lead to a downgrading the U.S. credit rating and trigger another economic crisis.

The administration is pushing back against a growing number of Republicans who have expressed skepticism about those claims.

A standoff between Republicans and President Obama over his signature health care law has led to a partial shutdown of the federal government, now in its second week.

Republicans had originally sought to either defund or delay the law in exchange for funding the government and raising the debt ceiling, and Boehner has called on Obama to hold negotiations before letting the House vote.

But the president says he will not negotiate until Congress approves the issues without any conditions.

The partial shutdown has halted numerous government services, including death benefits to the families of U.S. service members killed in combat. The public backlash prompted the House to vote unanimously Wednesday to restore the benefits. The measure now goes to the Senate.

The Pentagon has reached an agreement with a private charity to pay the benefits until funding is restored.

Countries Holding US Debt

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Comments
     
by: Emmett from: Amherst, MA
October 10, 2013 8:29 AM
Obama hit the nail on the head when he asked what people would think if Democrats shut down the government to force Republicans to pass gun control legislation, then whined and blamed Republicans if they refused to cave in to their blackmail or to negotiate over the details of the gun control legislation the Democrats demanded as ransom. Would you blame the Republicans for the shut down? Of course not!


by: Alvin from: Michigan
October 10, 2013 8:18 AM
tax money is continuing to roll in to the federal govt. shutting parks only takes money away from the government and all the private businesses in the nearby area. The house of representatives have every right to write one bill assigning separate bill numbers to every section of their last bill and pass it without comment or delay. In fact, the way people in washington are wiggling around usual procedure, john boehner could probably order the clerk to redo the numbering system without a vote, since every word in those bills has already been debated and passed in the house as a single unit.The national debt is an unfortunate fact of life, and will not go away until someone who thinks like me becomes president. Having to raise the debt limit gradually from time to time is a handy reminder that a naturally rich country is trying its best to go broke. You do not give a gambler unlimited credit, and you do not give a govt an unlimited debt ceiling. This fact is neccessary to keep some present or future official from stealing the funds and ruining the country

In Response

by: Scott from: Atlanta
October 12, 2013 8:31 AM
Great comment. It is irresponsible reporting to continue to report that we will default on our debt. We take in plenty of money to pay our debt. Obuma would be forced to choose what gets funded. Can anyone imagine any entity having 800,000 non-essential employees. Only stupid people spend more than they bring in. That's why most Dems have $300.00 max limit credit cards.


by: dr from: usa
October 10, 2013 8:12 AM
Republicans need to stand up on lessen the government handouts. We are a WELFARE society dependent on the government... Make the generational welfare people go out and get a job... Don't say there are no jobs McDonalds is always hiring... Stop coming up with excuses, where is the accountability?


by: NCTAXPAYER13 from: Vale NC
October 10, 2013 8:11 AM
The US Congress has 'temporarily' raising the US Debt ceiling since the 1790s. As I study the records I only see one instance when they LOWERED it, and that was SHORT Lived. Apparently 'temporarily means until the NEXT increase' because of POOR monetary policy.

In Response

by: Alvin from: Michigan
November 08, 2013 7:39 AM
Nctaxpayer13 is absolutely correct. The last time the usa had no debt and no deficit was under president andrew jackson.


by: Steve from: Albuquerque
October 10, 2013 7:55 AM
No more 0bama vacations.
No more 0bama golf.
No more 0bama frivolous spending on green crap.
No more 0bama using Air Force One for stupid 0bama campaigning!


by: hisgoodteenr from: Denver
October 10, 2013 7:44 AM
finally! GOP is softening. no more ACA on the table. thanks for your unconditional surrender.

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