News / Europe

    Putin Urges Separatists in Ukraine to Postpone Referendum

    Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at a joint news conference with Swiss Federal President Didier Burkhalter, at the Kremlin in Moscow, May 7, 2014.
    Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at a joint news conference with Swiss Federal President Didier Burkhalter, at the Kremlin in Moscow, May 7, 2014.
    VOA News
    Russian President Vladimir Putin called on separatists in east Ukraine on Wednesday to postpone a referendum on secession for the mostly Russian-speaking region and said Moscow had withdrawn troops from the border with Ukraine.

    By potentially forestalling a dismemberment of Ukraine, Putin's comments appeared to open a way to easing the East-West standoff over Russia's role in the country's crisis.

    The pro-Russian separatists behind the referendum said they would consider on Thursday whether to postpone Sunday's vote.

    Putin said he issued the call in order to "create the necessary conditions for dialogue."

    Reacting to the appeal, the White House said the referendum should be canceled altogether, not merely postponed.

    Related video report by VOA's Meredith Buel:
     
    Putin Calls for Delay of Secession Referendumi
    || 0:00:00
    ...  
     
    X
    Meredith Buel
    May 08, 2014 1:04 AM
    Russian President Vladimir Putin has urged pro-Moscow separatists in Ukraine to postpone a vote on secession Sunday. Putin's call comes during a vigorous debate within the United States over whether additional sanctions should be slapped on Russia. VOA correspondent Meredith Buel reports.

    In another suprise announcement, Putin added that Russians troops that had been placed near the border with Ukraine had been withdrawn.

    But the Pentagon says it has not seen any signs of troop movements. NATO and Ukrainian officials say they, too, have seen no evidence of any withdrawal.

    The White House said it would welcome a pull-back.

    “We would certainly welcome a meaningful and transparent withdrawal of Russian military forces from the border. That's something that we have sought for quite some time," said a spokesperson, adding that there has been no evidence that such a withdrawal has taken place.

    In another reversal, Putin said that presidential elections in Ukraine, scheduled for May 25, would be "a move in the right direction."

    He made his comments after talks with the head of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Swiss President Didier Burkhalter, who said the security and rights body would soon propose a “road map” to defuse the crisis in Ukraine.

    Meanwhile, Ukraine's Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk dismissed Putin’s appeal for a postponement of the referendum, describing it with a term equivalent to “hot air.” He also questioned why the issue of Ukraine was being discussed without Kyiv’s participation.

    People's Assembly

    A pro-Russian separatist leader said the separatists would consider Putin's call to postpone their referendum at a meeting of their self-proclaimed People's Assembly on Thursday. "We have the utmost respect for President Putin. If he considers that necessary, we will of course discuss it," Denis Pushilin said in Donetsk, a city of 1 million people that the rebels have proclaimed capital of an independent "People's Republic of Donetsk".

    Since a pro-Russian president was ousted in an uprising in February, Putin has overturned decades of post-Cold War diplomacy by proclaiming the right to send troops to Ukraine and seizing and annexing Crimea.

    A rebellion in the east has raised the prospect that Ukraine, a country of around 45 million people the size of France, could be carved up or even descend into civil war, pitting Russian-speaking easterners against pro-European Ukrainian speakers in the West.

    Residents in areas held by the pro-Moscow rebels were stunned by Putin's remarks at a time when the region seemed to be hurtling towards inevitable independence and a week of bloodshed had brought animosity towards Kiev to a fever pitch.

    "Maybe Putin doesn't understand the situation? There is no way this referendum isn't happening," said Natalia Smoller, a pensioner who has been bringing food to rebels manning a roadblock in Slaviansk, a town turned into a fortified redoubt where fighters withstood a government advance this week.

    Nevertheless, experts predicted the separatists would heed Putin's call to stand down for now. "Among those confronting Ukrainian troops, a certain logic should prevail under which they understand that without the support of Russia and thereby the Russian army, they could be subjected to heavy military strikes," said Yevgeny Minchenko, a political analyst friendly to the Kremlin.

    Russian share prices surged after Putin's remarks, seen as reducing the likelihood of damaging new sanctions. The MICEX index shot up 3.64 percent.

    NATO again warns Russia

    Despite President Putin’s surprise statements on the secession vote in east Ukraine and supposed Russian troop withdrawals, NATO's Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen called on Moscow on Wednesday to stop supporting separatists in Ukraine and scale back troops from Ukraine's border to create a base for political solution to the Ukraine-Russia conflict.

    Speaking after a meeting with Poland’s foreign and defense ministers, Rasmussen said NATO was not able to confirm a withdrawal of Russian troops.

    “Russia should live up to its international commitments and stop supporting separatists and scale back troops from the border, so political solutions can be found,” he told reporters in Warsaw.

    Rasmussen added that, if needed, NATO will not hesitate to take all necessary steps to increase the security of its allies in central and eastern Europe, which may include reinforced exercises, reviewed defense plans and a proper deployment of troops.

    Ukraine fighting

    Ukrainian forces seized the rebel-held city hall in the eastern port of Mariupol overnight, driving out pro-Russian militants, then withdrew, making no apparent attempt to hold on to the building, witnesses said on Wednesday.
    Armed pro-Russian rebels stand guard outside the town hall in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, May 4, 2014.Armed pro-Russian rebels stand guard outside the town hall in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, May 4, 2014.
    x
    Armed pro-Russian rebels stand guard outside the town hall in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, May 4, 2014.
    Armed pro-Russian rebels stand guard outside the town hall in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, May 4, 2014.


    Ukraine's Channel 5 television said earlier Wednesday the Ukrainian National Guard had seized the administrative center in Mariupol, a mainly Russian-speaking city of nearly 500,000 people and key component in the self-declared breakaway People's Republic of Donetsk that had announced plans to hold a referendum on secession Sunday.

    Pro-Russia separatists reported that five of their activists were killed in skirmishes Wednesday.

    Also on Wednesday there were reports of clashes in the separatist stronghold of Slovyansk, as Ukrainian troops advanced on rebel positions.

    Ukraine elections

    On May 25, Ukrainians plan to hold presidential elections in hopes of stabilizing the volatile situation in their country. The vote is to formally replace president Viktor Yanukovych, who in February fled Kyiv for Russia amid mass protests against his government. Ukraine has since been led by an acting president, Oleksandr Turchynov.

    Secretary of State John Kerry said Tuesday the U.S., in coordination with the European Union, will impose broader sanctions against Russia if it attempts to sabotage the election.

    U.S. Treasury Undersecretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence David Cohen said on Wednesday Washington is working with others to ensure that sanctions will cost Moscow dearly if it does not change its tune on Ukraine.

    Briefing journalists in Paris during a tour of European capitals, Cohen said: “We are moving in a strong and systematic way to maximize the cost on Russia ... while minimizing to the extent possible the spillover on other economies, including those here in Europe.”

    Kyiv and the West believe Russia is in large part financing and choreographing the separatist violence in east Ukraine in an effort to destabilize the country because of its new government's pro-Western course.

    Moscow denies that it has a hand in Ukraine's unrest. It has previously also put into question the legitmacy of the planned presidential elections saying that no fair poll can be held when Ukrainian troops are being used against "the country's own citizens."

    Kremlin clarifies

    Elaborating on President Putin's suprise endorsement of presidentail elections in Ukraine, the Kremlin has outlined conditions under which Moscow would condone the poll, just hours after the Russian leader also called on separatists in east Ukraine to put off a referendum on secession.

    The Slon.ru website quoted Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov on Wednesday as saying that if supporters of "federalization" in eastern Ukraine heed Putin's call to postpone the referendum, and if Kyiv halts its military operation against pro-Russian activists and moves to begin a "dialogue," then the Ukrainian presidential election set for May 25 can legitimately be held.  

    Peskov added that the Kremlin is not negotiating with Kyiv authorities, and that Putin's proposal to postpone the plebiscite is "not a step towards Kyiv, but a step towards all Ukrainian people," the website reported.

    Economic wrangling

    Also on Wednesday, the Kremlin said many U.S. companies were coming under pressure not to attend an economic forum that is hosted by President Vladimir Putin and widely seen as Russia's counterweight to the annual World Economic Forum in Davos.

    The May 22-24 St. Petersburg Economic Forum is usually attended by chief executives of large U.S. firms, as well as heads of other international companies, but the U.S. government has said it would not be appropriate for them to attend this year because of the crisis in Ukraine.

    The Forum aims to showcase Russia as a place to invest but has not always succeeded in persuading executives worried by red tape, corruption and poor legal protection.

    Separately, President Barack Obama gave the U.S. Congress official notice on Wednesday that he plans to pull Russia from a program that allows duty-free imports of certain goods, known as the Generalized System of Preferences, the White House said.

    Russia is "sufficiently advanced economically" and no longer needs the special treatment, the White House said.

    EU reaches sanctions deal

    European Union governments reached a preliminary agreement on Wednesday to expand the legal criteria for targeting individuals and companies with sanctions meant to pressure Russia over Ukraine, opening the way for new listings as soon as Monday, diplomats said.

    The decision, which should make it easier for the EU to target Russian companies, has to be formally approved during a meeting of EU foreign ministers on Monday.

    “We have political approval, and it will have to be rubber-stamped,” one diplomat said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    Two other diplomats also said senior EU officials were due to discuss specific names of potential targets later on Wednesday.

    The EU has already imposed asset freezes and visa bans on 48 Russians and Ukrainians over Moscow's annexation of Crimea.

    Warsaw snubs Kremlin

    Poland on Wednesday awarded a prize for championing democracy and human rights to Mustafa Dzhemilev, a leader of the Tatar community in Ukraine's Crimean peninsula who says he was barred from the region after Russia annexed it.

    “He is a defender of Ukraine's integrity,” said Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski, as he announced Dzhemilev had been awarded the prize. “He is someone who, together with his people, has demonstrated that democracy is possible.”

    Tatars are a Turkic-speaking Muslim community who make up about 12 percent of Crimea's two million-strong population. Many Crimean Tatars oppose a return to Moscow's control, especially as they were persecuted during Soviet rule.

    The choice of laureate for the inaugural “Solidarity Prize” is likely to irk Russia.

    Some information for this report provided by Reuters.
     

    You May Like

    How Aleppo Rebels Plan to Withstand Assad's Siege

    Rebels in Aleppo are laying plans to withstand a siege by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s forces in likelihood the regime cuts a final main supply line running west of city

    Probe Targeting China's Statistic Head Sparks Concern

    Economists now asking what prompted government to launch an investigation only months after Wang Baoan had been vetted for crucial job

    HRW: Both Sides in Ukraine Conflict Targeted, Used Schools

    Rights group documents how both sides in Ukraine conflict carried out attacks on schools and used them for military purposes

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: gen from: Japan
    May 07, 2014 10:58 PM
    Mr Putin is right.As I thought the president of Russia.Pro russian should not listen to noise from West.They should find or choose a man or a woman which become a negotialtor on behalf of Pro russian and
    has a potentially oft the president in Ukraine.On top of that ,he or she had better have a pipe with West.And soon Start the negotiate with the interim government in Kiev.
    But who is the right person?
    Uuum.still Mr Putin? Should ask him to change his nationality to Ukraine for a while? No way?

    by: Wiktor Protsenko from: Kyiv
    May 07, 2014 3:43 PM
    In its unannounced war against Ukraine, Russia relies on covert operations which fall squarely within the definition of "international terrorism" under 18 U.S.C. § 2331.
    Specifically, armed operatives of Russia, acting under disguise, attempt to influence the policy of Ukrainian government by intimidation or coercion. They also try to affect the conduct of a government by assassinations and kidnapping, taking by force government buildings, police posts and military bases of Ukraine.
    This activity is being conducted on large scale and over prolonged time period, despite condemnation by the USA, G-7, NATO, EU and UN.
    Please sign the petition urging the White House to officially designate Russia as "State sponsor of terrorism” - http://wh.gov/lwuL9
    Such status of country would outlaw business of American companies with Russia. Even considering of the petition by Senate and President of USA creating great inconvenience Russian authorities.

    by: Anonymous
    May 07, 2014 2:52 PM
    It's too bad Putin didn't act flawless and peaceful, it would only make Russia stronger, by promoting peace and democracy.

    by: meanbill from: USA
    May 07, 2014 11:20 AM
    SEE, Putin is a man for peace, while the US and EU support coup led Kiev leaders in using violence against their own people? -- Could it be that a secret deal has been worked out with the US and Russia? Putin studied "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu, "Know your enemy, and know yourself, and you can win a hundred battles without losing a single man." --- CRIMEA? - what's next?
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    May 07, 2014 2:57 PM
    Promoting peace is one thing, it isn't done by harassing and taking over other peoples country illegally. It only makes matters worse. But inaction like the inaction in Syria while bashar al assad murders many tens of thousands of civilians is also making things worse however.
    In Response

    by: Good Sheperd from: USA
    May 07, 2014 12:55 PM
    The goal is peace, prosperity. and security for men, women and children of Ukraine. We have a window of opportunity now. Let's stop the blame game and move forward for peace. The people of Ukraine deserve nothing less.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Russia's Car Sales Shrink Overall, But Luxury and Economy Models See Growthi
    X
    February 10, 2016 5:54 AM
    Car sales in Russia dropped by more than a third in 2015 because of the country's economic woes. But, at the extreme ends of the car market, luxury vehicles and some economy brands are actually experiencing growth. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
    Video

    Video Russia's Car Sales Shrink Overall, But Luxury and Economy Models See Growth

    Car sales in Russia dropped by more than a third in 2015 because of the country's economic woes. But, at the extreme ends of the car market, luxury vehicles and some economy brands are actually experiencing growth. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports from Moscow.
    Video

    Video Civil Rights Pioneer Remembers Struggle for Voting Rights

    February is Black History Month in the United States. The annual, month-long national observance pays tribute to important people and events that shaped the history of African Americans. VOA's Chris Simkins reports how one man fought against discrimination to help millions of blacks obtain the right to vote
    Video

    Video Jordanian Theater Group Stages Anti-Terrorism Message

    The lure of the self-styled “Islamic State” has many parents worried about their children who may be susceptible to the organization’s online propaganda. Dozens of Muslim communities in the Middle East are fighting back -- giving young adults alternatives to violence. One group in Jordan is using dramatic expression a send a family message. Mideast Broadcasting Network correspondent Haider Al Abdali shared this report with VOA. It’s narrated by Bronwyn Benito
    Video

    Video Migrant Crisis Fuels Debate Over Britain’s Future in EU

    The migrant crisis in Europe is fueling the debate in Britain ahead of a referendum on staying in the European Union that may be held this year. Prime Minister David Cameron warns that leaving the EU could lead to thousands more migrants arriving in the country. Meanwhile, tension is rising in Calais, France, where thousands of migrants are living in squalid camps. VOA's Henry Ridgwell reports.
    Video

    Video Valentine's Day Stinks for Lebanese Clowns

    This weekend, on Valentine's Day in Lebanon, love is not the only thing in the air. More than half a year after the country's trash crisis began, the stink of uncollected garbage remains on the streets. Step forward "Clown Me In," a group of clowns who use their skills for activism. Before the most romantic day of the year the clowns have released their unusual take on love in Lebanon -- in a bid to keep the pressure up and get the trash off the streets. John Owens reports from Beirut.
    Video

    Video Families Flee Aleppo for Kurdish Regions in Syria

    Not all who flee the fighting in Aleppo are trying to cross the border into Turkey. A VOA reporter caught up with several families heading for Kurdish-held areas of northern Syria.
    Video

    Video Rocky Year Ahead for Nigeria Amid Oil Price Crash

    The global fall in the price of oil has rattled the economies of many petroleum exporters, and Africa’s oil king Nigeria is no exception. As Chris Stein reports from Lagos, analysts are predicting a rough year ahead for the continent’s top producer of crude.
    Video

    Video 'No Means No' Program Targets Sexual Violence in Kenya

    The organizers of an initiative to reduce and stop rape in the informal settlements around Kenya's capital say their program is having marked success. Girls are taking self-defense classes while the boys are learning how to protect the girls and respect them. Lenny Ruvaga reports from Nairobi.
    Video

    Video Chocolate Lovers Get a Sweet History Lesson

    Observed in many countries around the world, Valentine’s Day is sometimes celebrated with chocolate festivals. But at a festival near Washington, the visitors experience a bit more than a sugar rush. They go on a sweet journey through history. VOA’s June Soh takes us to the festival.
    Video

    Video 'Smart' Bandages Could Heal Wounds More Quickly

    Simple bandages are usually seen as the first line of attack in healing small to moderate wounds and burns. But scientists say new synthetic materials with embedded microsensors could turn bandages into a much more valuable tool for emergency physicians. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Researchers Use 3-D Printer to Produce Transplantable Body Parts

    Human organ transplants have become fairly common around the world in the past few decades. Researchers at various universities are coordinating their efforts to find solutions -- including teams at the University of Pennsylvania and Rice University in Houston that are experimenting with a 3-D printer -- to make blood vessels and other structures for implant. As VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Houston, they are also using these artificial body parts to seek ways of defeating cancerous tumors.
    Video

    Video Helping the Blind 'See' Great Art

    There are 285 million blind and visually impaired people in the world who are unable to enjoy visual art at a museum. One New York photographer is trying to fix this situation by making tangible copies of the world’s masterpieces. VOA correspondent Victoria Kupchinetsky was there as visually impaired people got a feel for great art. Joy Wagner narrates her report.
    Video

    Video German Artists to Memorialize Refugees With Life Jacket Exhibit

    Sold in every kind of shop in some Turkish port towns, life jackets have become a symbol of the refugee crisis that brought a million people to Europe in 2015.  On the shores of Lesbos, Greece, German artists collect discarded life jackets as they prepare an art installation they plan to display in Germany.  For VOA, Hamada Elrasam has this report from Lesbos, Greece.
    Video

    Video E-readers Help Ease Africa's Book Shortage

    Millions of people in Africa can't read, and there's a chronic shortage of books. A non-profit organization called Worldreader is trying to help change all that one e-reader at a time. VOA’s Deborah Block tells us about a girls' school in Nairobi, Kenya where Worldreader is making a difference.