Ryan's Speech Excites Republican Delegates

    Republican vice presidential nominee, Rep. Paul Ryan addresses the Republican National Convention Aug. 29, 2012
    Republican vice presidential nominee, Rep. Paul Ryan addresses the Republican National Convention Aug. 29, 2012
    TAMPA, FL — U.S. Voters got their first real look at Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan Wednesday.  Ryan, a congressman from Wisconsin, delivered his acceptance speech before the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, and a nationwide TV audience. 

    The 42-year old Congressman was little known nationally just a few weeks ago.  But he was thrust into the political limelight Wednesday when he formally accepted the Republican Party's vice presidential nomination as Mitt Romney’s runningmate.

    Ryan brought Republican delegates to their feet several times with a searing critique of President Obama's economic record.

    “It all started off with Greek columns, stirring speeches and the thrill of something new.  Now all that's left is a presidency adrift, surviving on slogans that already seem tired, grasping at a moment that has already passed, like a ship trying to sail on yesterday's wind,” he said.

    Ryan said if he and Mitt Romney are elected in November they will repeal President Obama's signature health care reform law and will work to trim the nation's $16 trillion debt.

    Ryan is a favorite of conservatives and was the author of controversial budget proposals in the Republican controlled House of Representatives that would reform popular social welfare programs like Medicare, the government health care system for the elderly.

    Democrats say the Republican plan to reform Medicare would increase costs for seniors, but Ryan says he and Mr. Romney will press the debate as part of a plan to get the country out of debt.

    “We will not duck the tough issues.  We will lead.  We will not spend four years blaming others.  We will take responsibility.  We will not try to replace our founding principles.  We will reapply our founding principles,” he said.

    Watch realated report by Suzanne Presto

    There was also a heavy focus in Wednesday's convention program on foreign policy, including a speech from Senator John McCain, the party nominee who lost to Barack Obama in 2008.

    McCain criticized the president for not taking a more active role in the conflict in Syria.

    “In other times, when other courageous people fought for their freedom against sworn enemies of the United States, American presidents - both Republicans and Democrats - have acted to help them prevail.  Sadly, for the lonely voices of dissent in Syria, and Iran, and elsewhere, who feel forgotten in their darkness, and sadly for us, as well, our president is not being true to our values,” he said.

    In addition to McCain, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice told the delegates that Mitt Romney would restore U.S. Leadership around the world if he wins in November.

    “Dictators in Iran and Syria butcher their people and threaten regional security.  Russia and China prevent a response and everyone asks, where does America stand?  Indeed that is the question of the hour.  Where does America stand?  You see, when friends or foes alike don't know the answer to that question, unambiguously and clearly, the world is likely to be a more dangerous and chaotic place,” she said.

    The Republican convention will conclude on Thursday when presidential nominee Mitt Romney will give his formal acceptance speech before thousands of spectators in the hall and tens of millions of people watching on television both in the United States and around the world.  It is potentially a key pivot point in the campaign and comes amid public opinion polls that show the race between Mr. Romney and Mr. Obama remains close.

    • Mitt Romney, vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan (R) and Campaign Manager Matt Rhoades pose for a staff portrait on the steps of the stage at the Republican National Conventionm in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012.
    • Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan wave to delegates after speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012.
    • Mitt Romney hugs his grandchildren after his speech, August 30, 2012.
    • Actor Clint Eastwood speaks to an empty chair on the final night of the convention, August 30, 2012.
    • The Republican National Convention main stage at the Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Florida. (B. Allen/VOA)
    • The Texas delegation reacts to speeches at the convention. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice addresses the crowd, August 29, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Ann Romney hugs her husband after she addressed delegates during the second session of the Republican National Convention, August 28, 2012.
    • Montana delegates on the floor of the convention. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Dona Poelman from Racine, Wisconsin accessorizes her shirt at the RNC.
    • Delegates cheer as an image of Mitt Romney is displayed during the opening session, August 27, 2012.
    • Texas delegate Clint Moore and the rest of Texas delegates fashion their cowboy hats on the floor.
    • Men prepare food in a protest camp called "Romneyville" outside the convention center.
    • Delegates on the floor watch speakers during the second session. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Delegate Sol Grosskopf from Shawano, Wisconisin wears cheesehead hat on the convention floor.
    • Convention goers pause in the prayer room.
    • A sudden, heavy rainstorm surprises protesters outside near the convention center.
    • A worker walks down the aisle to collect trash on the floor at the convention.

    Jim Malone

    Jim Malone has served as VOA’s National correspondent covering U.S. elections and politics since 1995. Prior to that he was a VOA congressional correspondent and served as VOA’s East Africa Correspondent from 1986 to 1990. Jim began his VOA career with the English to Africa Service in 1983.

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: R Stone from: Japan
    August 30, 2012 3:06 AM
    The RNC is cutting their own feet off by stopping Ron Paul. Paul got a lot more votes than these people that spoke and he didn't even have a chance to speak... and his delegates stolen so he could not be on the ballet. The RNC will pay for this by losing so many of the strongest fire . The Fix was in, fraud was rampant, and now the RNC will see the loss.

    by: Sara from: LA
    August 30, 2012 12:39 AM
    Paul Ryan’s Hypocritical Attack on Barack Obama (Full Speech Video & Transcript) here http://goo.gl/0iFZF

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Chinese-Americans Heart Trump, Bucking National Trendi
    X
    May 27, 2016 5:57 AM
    A new study conducted by three Asian-American organizations shows there are three times as many Democrats as there are Republicans among Asian-American voters, and they favor Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. But one group, called Chinese-Americans For Trump, is going against the tide and strongly supports the business tycoon. VOA’s Elizabeth Lee caught up with them at a Trump rally and reports from Anaheim, California.
    Video

    Video Chinese-Americans Heart Trump, Bucking National Trend

    A new study conducted by three Asian-American organizations shows there are three times as many Democrats as there are Republicans among Asian-American voters, and they favor Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. But one group, called Chinese-Americans For Trump, is going against the tide and strongly supports the business tycoon. VOA’s Elizabeth Lee caught up with them at a Trump rally and reports from Anaheim, California.
    Video

    Video Reactions to Trump's Success Polarized Abroad

    What seemed impossible less than a year ago is now almost a certainty. New York real estate mogul Donald Trump has won the number of delegates needed to secure the Republican presidential nomination. The prospect has sparked as much controversy abroad as it has in the United States. Zlatica Hoke has more.
    Video

    Video Drawings by Children in Hiroshima Show Hope and Peace

    On Friday, President Barack Obama will visit Hiroshima, Japan, the first American president to do so while in office. In August 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city to force Japan's surrender in World War II. Although their city lay in ruins, some Hiroshima schoolchildren drew pictures of hope and peace. The former students and their drawings are now part of a documentary called “Pictures from a Hiroshima Schoolyard.” VOA's Deborah Block has the story.
    Video

    Video Vietnamese Rapper Performs for Obama

    A prominent young Vietnamese artist told President Obama said she faced roadblocks as a woman rapper, and asked the president about government support for the arts. He asked her to rap, and he even offered to provide a base beat for her. Watch what happened.
    Video

    Video Roots Run Deep for Tunisia's Dwindling Jewish Community

    This week, hundreds of Jewish pilgrims are defying terrorist threats to celebrate an ancient religious festival on the Tunisian island of Djerba. The festivities cast a spotlight on North Africa's once-vibrant Jewish population that has all but died out in recent decades. Despite rising threats of militant Islam and the country's battered economy, one of the Arab world's last Jewish communities is staying put and nurturing a new generation. VOA’s Lisa Bryant reports.
    Video

    Video Meet Your New Co-Worker: The Robot

    Increasing numbers of robots are joining the workforce, as companies scale back and more processes become automated. The latest robots are flexible and collaborative, built to work alongside humans as opposed to replacing them. VOA’s Tina Trinh looks at the next generation of automated employees helping out their human colleagues.
    Video

    Video Wheelchair Technology in Tune With Times

    Technologies for the disabled, including wheelchair technology, are advancing just as quickly as everything else in the digital age. Two new advances in wheelchairs offer improved control and a more comfortable fit. VOA's George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Baby Boxes Offer Safe Haven for Unwanted Children

    No one knows exactly how many babies are abandoned worldwide each year. The statistic is a difficult one to determine because it is illegal in most places. Therefore unwanted babies are often hidden and left to die. But as Erika Celeste reports from Woodburn, Indiana, a new program hopes to make surrendering infants safer for everyone.
    Video

    Video California Celebration Showcases Local Wines, Balloons

    Communities in the U.S. often hold festivals to show what makes them special. In California, for example, farmers near Fresno celebrate their figs and those around Gilmore showcase their garlic. Mike O'Sullivan reports that the wine-producing region of Temecula offers local vintages in an annual festival where rides on hot-air balloons add to the excitement.
    Video

    Video US Elementary School Offers Living Science Lessons

    Zero is not a good score on a test at school. But Discovery Elementary is proud of its “net zero” rating. Net zero describes a building in which the amount of energy provided by on-site renewable sources equals the amount of energy the building uses. As Faiza Elmasry tells us, the innovative features in the building turn the school into a teaching tool, where kids can't help but learn about science and sustainability. Faith Lapidus narrates.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora