News / Asia

Residents Living on China-N. Korea Border Await Calmer Times

Residents Living on China-N. Korea Border Await Calmer Timesi
X
April 13, 2013 5:46 PM
China's close ties with North Korea are most clearly seen in the cities and towns along their shared border, where brisk bilateral trade, Korean migrants and tourist businesses attest to warm relations. In the border city of Yanji in China's landlocked northeastern province, Jilin, many are looking forward to calmer days on the Korean peninsula. William Ide reports.

Residents Living on China-N. Korea Border Await Calmer Times

William Ide
China often describes its relations with North Korea as being as close as lips and teeth, but when tensions rise on the peninsula they test the strength of those ties. In the border city of Yanji, in China’s landlocked northeastern province of Jili, it is clear just how close those ties are and how much the two need each other.
 
Even as tensions on the Korean peninsula build, business keeps going between the North and this border city of Yanji.
 
At a local seafood distribution center, a manager surnamed Wang shows off a large hairy crab with meaty claws that was caught off North Korea’s shores.  The crabs are shipped in each night, then packed in boxes of ice and flown as far away as Shanghai.
 
Wang says tensions on the Korean peninsula have had little impact on his business because, as he puts it: “everyone needs to eat.”
 
“There really is no crisis, really the only challenges we face are at sea, such as typhoons, the inability of boats to go out to sea or seasonal fishing bans,” said Wang.
 
  • North Korean children hold up red scarves to be tied around their necks during an induction ceremony into the Korean Children's Union held at a stadium in Pyongyang, April 12, 2013.
  • Two military officers admire displays at a flower show featuring thousands of Kimilsungia flowers, named after the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung, Pyongyang, April 12, 2013.
  • South Korean soldiers stand guard at an observation post near the demilitarized zone (DMZ) which separates the two Koreas in Paju, north of Seoul April 11, 2013.
  • Female North Korean soldiers patrol along the banks of Yalu River, near the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, April 11, 2013.
  • A North Korean man blocks his face with his hand from being photographed as he and other residents take a ferry in Yalu River, near the North Korean town of Sinuiju, opposite the Chinese border city of Dandong, April 11, 2013.
  • People take part in an oath-taking before the statues of late North Korean leaders Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il on Mansudae Hill in Pyongyang, April 10, 2013. (KCNA)
  • Anti-North Korean protesters release balloons with peace messages on the Grand Unification Bridge leading to the North near the demilitarized zone separating the two Koreas, in Paju, north of Seoul, April 10, 2013.
  • South Koreans arrive with their belongings from North Korea's Kaesong at the customs, immigration and quarantine office near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, April 9, 2013.
  • Visitors look at the industrial complex in Kaesong, North Korea, through binoculars at Dora Observation Post in the demilitarized zone (DMZ) near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, April 9, 2013.
  • A South Korean military vehicle passes by gates leading to the North Korean city of Kaesong at the customs, immigration and quarantine office near the border village of Panmunjom, April 8, 2013.
  • An elementary school teacher orders her students to leave as they watch South Korean housewives denounce annual South Korean-U.S. military exercises, near the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, April 8, 2013.
  • South Korean army soldiers patrol along a barbed-wire fence near the border village of the Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, April 8, 2013.
  • North Korean military dogs run to a target with a portrait of South Korean Defence Minister Kim Kwan-jin during a military drill, April 6, 2013. (KCNA)

Crabs are just a part of the $5 billion in annual trade between China and North Korea. China supplies the North with a lifeline of fuel and food, and gets cheap iron ore and coal in return.
 
The number of North Koreans working in Chinese factories along the border is growing and it is estimated that as many as 40,000 are already here.
 
“Chinese companies residing in the border areas are very interested in very low wage of North Korean labor, and the rich mineral resources and also they want to use North Korean human resources not just based on low wages, they are also going to employ some North Korea in advanced technology such as IT area,” said Lim Eul-chul, a professor of North Korean studies at Kyungnam University in Seoul.
 
Tourism to North Korea from China is also growing. Chinese state media recently reported that the industry was seeing a boom this season just as tensions were rising.
 
But earlier this week, Chinese tours were put on hold. At a local tourism office, employees say there is little they can do but sit around and wait for the situation to change.
 
At the Liujing Hotel in Yanji, the sound of Mandarin and Korean mixes freely.  The hotel is run by North Korea.
 
The waitresses wear traditional Korean dresses, wait tables by day and perform at the hotel by night - singing and playing instruments.
 
They are fluent in Mandarin and speak some Russian as well. Yanji is close to Russia’s eastern border and while foreigners are few here, Russian tourists and traders are a common sight.
 
They say they occasionally get out for a movie, but when this reporter asked one what she thought of China, she just frowned and said she preferred Pyongyang.
 
Many Chinese residents here say they have no interest in visiting North Korea.
 
“They come over to find food, people have nothing to eat. Children can't eat and have little to wear, so they come here to earn money, to work," said one woman.  "Others come here to marry. They have children and settle here, once they obtain Chinese identification they leave to South Korea and never come back.”
 
One Yanji resident, a man surnamed Wang, says the North Korea of today is like China during the Cultural Revolution.
 
“Our economic relations are mainly based on commerce, for example in there they have mineral resources, here we have cheap goods, food and oil that we can exchange," he said. "Doing business in North Korea isn’t easy and business is based on trust. There it's a bit chaotic, sometimes close the border, it's not easy to foresee what will happen next.”
 
However, some analysts see a window of opportunity opening, if the North would just put its nuclear ambitions aside. They note that in addition to Kim Jung Un’s recent threats, he has also spoken about building up the North’s economy and improving people’s lives.
 
Peking University political scientist Wang Dong says China wants to convince North Korea that it is in its best interest to open up.
 
“To really open up to the international community, and start a reform process that will bring prosperity to their own people, not just poverty and not just keep on saber rattling,” said Wang.
 
And that is something that could not only benefit the North, but China’s northeastern provinces as well.

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