News / Asia

Beijing Draws Online Ridicule Over Air Defense

Chinese military Y-8 airborne early warning plane flies through airspace between Okinawa's main island and smaller Miyako island, southern Japan, Oct. 27, 2013.
Chinese military Y-8 airborne early warning plane flies through airspace between Okinawa's main island and smaller Miyako island, southern Japan, Oct. 27, 2013.
VOA News
The Chinese government has drawn ridicule from domestic Internet users for its low-key reaction to U.S. and Japanese aircraft ignoring Beijing's creation of an air defense zone in the East China Sea.
 
Many Chinese microbloggers posted messages Wednesday mocking the ruling Communist Party or lamenting that it has become, in their view, an international "laughing stock."
 
China declared an Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) over disputed waters in the East China Sea on Saturday. It said all foreign civilian and military aircraft flying in the zone must identify themselves and follow Beijing's instructions or face unspecified "emergency measures."
 
The Chinese zone includes air space above a resource-rich chain of uninhabited islands claimed by China and controlled by Japan, a regional rival.
 
Chinese nationalist commentators initially expressed a largely positive view of the move as a sign of China's greater assertiveness in dealing with Japan and its key ally the United States.
 
But the United States said it flew two unarmed B-52 bombers through the zone on Monday without notifying China. Japanese airlines operating in the area stopped submitting flight plans to Beijing on Wednesday, at the request of the Japanese government.
 
China's defense ministry said Wednesday it monitored the U.S. military planes while they transited the zone. It also insisted that China has the capability to exercise "effective control" of the air space.
 
When asked whether China will take tougher measures if there are further such incidents, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said Beijing will "respond accordingly depending on the different circumstances and the threat levels that we may face."
 
The Chinese government's muted statements on the issue prompted many Internet users to describe the Chinese aerial zone as a farce. Those sympathetic to the government said stronger action is needed in future.
 
In a Weibo message monitored by Reuters, outspoken retired Chinese Major General Luo Yuan called for the zone to be "enforced to the full" and said "no country must think that they can ... leave things to chance."
 
Chinese officials have said Beijing established the ADIZ in order to exercise its "right" to defend national sovereignty. They also have said China is acting like other nations that have created aerial notification zones in international airspace.
 
The United States and Japan have their own aerial zones, but only require foreign aircraft to identify themselves if those planes intend to pass through U.S. and Japanese national airspace.
 
Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

You May Like

VOA Exclusive: Interview With Myanmar President Thein Sein

Thein Sein calls allegations that minority Muslim Rohingya are fleeing alleged torture in Rakhine state a media fabrication More

Video Better Protective Suit Sought for Ebola Caregivers

Current suit is uncomfortable, requires too many steps for removal, increasing chance of deadly contact with virus More

UN Rights Commission Investigates Eritrea

Three-member commission will start collecting first-hand information from victims and other witnesses in Switzerland and Italy next week More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: icansee4miles from: New York
November 29, 2013 6:05 AM
The Dragon's mask has slipped; not so friendly now, is it? President Obama's strategy with Iran and the Middle East now becomes clear; assets are being deployed to stop the world's top hegemonist-China; as foretold in Amazon Kindle's new thriller, The Bahrain Protocol; a snippet is below. Looking past the Conference Leader out the window at the flag, symbol of liberty, the Aide said in a low voice, “America has no friends in the Middle East.” “We have been used to clean up other nation’s messes for a very long time, and the President has seen the price America paid for invading Afghanistan and Iraq.” He turned to look at the Conference Leader with a light behind his eyes, “The President wants to conserve America’s resources for the fight that is coming; the real fight, which will be with China.”


by: JKF from: Great North (Canada)
November 28, 2013 4:46 PM
I think that the PRC declarations need to be taken very seriously, and addressed at the UN, because it is their foot in the door. In a year or so, if their air control declaration is not addressed, they will set up a maritime control zone, followed by an actual landing on the islands in dispute. Just look at how they proceeded in some other similar situations, like off the Philipines/Viet Nam, a very similar modus operandi, no one took them seriously either untill they entrenched their navy and started building fortifications on shoals/reefs in disputed zones claimed by the PRC.


by: Nguyễn from: US
November 28, 2013 12:49 PM
Not just American military aircrafts flew into new Chinese ADIZ but also Japanese and South Korean airforces have conducted joyful air-shows in the same zone. They didn't bother with what Chinese had said about ADIZ.

In Response

by: Ulchi from: US
November 28, 2013 7:04 PM
Risk of confrontation is there, either with intension or a missed calculation or just a stuppid mistake by any one.


by: Weiwei from: beijing
November 28, 2013 12:34 AM
You need not comment on the inland response from chinese internet users biasly. It is not the whole thing. As a microblogger, I don't think the chinese government's response to your two unarmed B-52 bombers insufficient or in adequate.


by: Kamikaze from: Japan
November 27, 2013 10:20 PM
Chinese (PRC) government does not need to set any ADIZ because according to its claim, the whole world may belong to China from acient times. No one in the rest of the world respects PRC.


by: SINO-US BAR from: ZHEJIANG CHINA
November 27, 2013 9:30 PM
Chinese government is professional at cracking down the domenstic unarmed citizens, but seems very weak and coward to face the foreign challenges, even from the much smaller and weaker countries such as Vietnam, Phillipines, Korea, not to say USA, and Japan. So do not worry about any so called visibly strong claims, because China is only likely to show muscles to local popular residents but not to abroad. During the earlier stage of new-funding China, Chairman called those powerful western stations as paper tiger to upgrate the inside confidence to confront with them, and Now the real "paper tiger" is the current China. so do not worry, US, and Japan, this tiger will not bite you by any means even you poke his nose!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ebola Economic Toll Stirs W. Africa Food Security Concernsi
X
November 19, 2014 11:39 PM
The World Bank said Wednesday that it expects the economic impact of the Ebola outbreak on the sub-Saharan economy to cost somewhere betweenf $3 billion to $4 billion - well below a previously-outlined worst-case scenario of $32 billion. Some economists, however, paint a gloomier picture - warning that the disruption to regional markets and trading is considerable. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Ebola Economic Toll Stirs W. Africa Food Security Concerns

The World Bank said Wednesday that it expects the economic impact of the Ebola outbreak on the sub-Saharan economy to cost somewhere betweenf $3 billion to $4 billion - well below a previously-outlined worst-case scenario of $32 billion. Some economists, however, paint a gloomier picture - warning that the disruption to regional markets and trading is considerable. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Mexico Protests Escalate Over Disappearances

Protests in Mexico over 43 students missing since September continue to escalate, reflecting growing anger among Mexicans about a political system they view as corrupt, and increasingly tainted by the drug trade. Mounting outrage over the disappearances is now focused on the government of President Enrique Pena Nieto, accused of not doing enough to end insecurity in the country. More from VOA's Victoria Macchi.
Video

Video US Senate Votes Down Controversial Oil Pipeline - For Now

The U.S. Senate has rejected construction of a controversial pipeline to transport Canadian oil to American refineries. The $5 billion project still could be approved next year, but it faces a possible veto by President Barack Obama. As VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, the pipeline has exposed deep divisions in Congress about America’s energy future.
Video

Video Can Minsk Cease-fire Agreement Hold?

Growing tensions between government troops and separatists in eastern Ukraine further threaten a cease-fire agreement reached two months ago in the Belarusian capital of Minsk. Critics of U.S. policy in Ukraine say it is time the Obama administration gives up on that much-violated cease-fire and moves toward a new deal with Russia. VOA's Scott Stearns has more.
Video

Video Chaos, Abuse Defy Solution in Libya

The political and security crisis in Libya is deepening, with competing governments and, according to Amnesty International, widespread human rights violations committed with impunity. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London.
Video

Video US Hosts Record 866,000 Foreign Students

Close to 900,000 international students are studying at American universities and colleges, more than ever before. About half of them come from Asia, mostly China. The United States hosts more foreign students than any other country in the world, and its foreign student population is steadily growing. Zlatica Hoke reports.
Video

Video Ferguson Church Grapples with Race Relations

Many white residents of Ferguson, Missouri, say they chose to live there because of the American Midwest community's diversity. So, they were shocked when a white police officer killed an unarmed black teenager in August – and shaken by the resulting protests and violence. Some local churches are leading conversations on how to go forward. VOA’s Ayesha Tanzeem reports.
Video

Video What Jon Stewart Learned About Iran From 'Rosewater'

Jon Stewart, host of the satirical news program "The Daily Show" talks with Saman Arbabi of Voice of America's Persian service about Stewart's directorial debut, "Rosewater."
Video

Video Lebanese Winemakers Thrive Despite War Next Door

In some of the most volatile parts of Lebanon, where a constant flow of refugees crosses the border from Syria, one industry continues to flourish against the odds. Lebanese winemakers say after surviving a brutal civil war in the 1970s and 80s, they can survive anything. Heather Murdock has more for VOA from the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon.
Video

Video China's Rise Closely Watched

China’s role as APEC host this week allowed a rare opportunity for Beijing to showcase its vision for the global economy and the region. But as China’s stature grows, so have tensions with other countries, including the United States. VOA’s Bill Ide in Beijing reports on how China’s rise as a global power is seen among Chinese and Americans.

All About America

AppleAndroid