News / Asia

    China Lambasts Japan's Wartime Aggression to German Chancellor

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) chats with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during the signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, July 7, 2014.
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) chats with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during the signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, July 7, 2014.
    VOA News

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel is in Beijing where she met Monday with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang.

    The German leader is heading a large business delegation, and discussions with senior Chinese leaders are expected to focus on business and political ties.

    Merkel arrived in Beijing Monday from Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province. She spent a day of her three-day visit there to tap business potential for German firms in western China.

    China, which frequently praises Germany for its contrition over World War II, pointedly emphasized Japanese wartime aggression on Monday.

    Premier Li Keqiang's comments come as China intensifies an anti-Japan propaganda campaign focused on wartime atrocities after Tokyo ended a ban on its military fighting abroad last week.

    In remarks to mostly German and Chinese reporters, as well as Merkel, Li pointed out that Monday was the 77th anniversary of the Marco Polo Bridge incident, a skirmish in 1937 that sparked an all-out Sino-Japanese war. Li said the day was one “the Chinese people must always bear firmly in mind.”

    “Facing an all-encompassing war started by Japanese militarists against China, the Chinese people rose up with all their strength to resist,” Li said. “They resisted in the blood-soaked war for eight years before finally achieving victory.

    “We must always remember history to correctly face up to the past,” he added.

    China has often contrasted Germany with Japan, which it says has sought to rewrite history by whitewashing military aggression.

    Diplomatic sources have told Reuters Germany did not want to get dragged into the dispute between China and Japan, and dislikes China constantly bringing up Germany's painful past.

    Merkel made no mention of the war in public comments.

    In comments to reporters, Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Tokyo would watch China “closely” on issues of history.

    “The Japanese government believes that it is not beneficial for regional peace and cooperation that China tries to turn history and other issues into international issues,” he said. “Japan's post-war steps as a peace-loving nation are highly lauded in international society.”

    Ties between China and Japan, Asia's largest economies, have been shadowed by friction over Beijing's military rise and a territorial dispute in the East China Sea, as well as ugly memories about Japan's occupation of parts of China before and during World War II.

    Japanese leaders have repeatedly apologized for suffering caused by the country's wartime actions, including a landmark 1995 apology by then-Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama. Japan's government, including Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, has repeatedly said that Japan has faced up to its past sincerely.

    But contradictory remarks from conservative politicians have cast doubt on that sincerity.

    Chinese President Xi Jinping made a lengthy speech, aired on state television, in commemorating the Marco Polo anniversary.

    “The Chinese people, who have paid a heavy sacrifice, will unswervingly defend with their blood and lives the history that has been written,” Xi said. “It is regrettable that... there is still a small portion on people who ignore reality, move against the tide of history, and repeatedly deny or even beautify a history of aggression, harming international trust, creating regional tensions and sparking censure from the Chinese people as well as all the peace-loving people of the world.” 

    This is Merkel's seventh visit to China as chancellor. She plans to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping later Monday. Xi visited Germany in March where the two leaders signed various trade and economic agreements.

    Reuters contributed to this report.

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    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Patrick from: Ca
    July 14, 2014 12:34 PM
    We are to blame for Chinese rise to power, Wall Street could not resist the cheap labor! Now USA is out of jobs and china is growing communist threat! Bad on our heads of state and industry, bring jobs back home, or at least to countries who appreciate our business and show reciprocity,

    by: william Li from: canada
    July 07, 2014 4:36 PM
    the world must watch Japan closely. Japan keeps denying its war atrocity and worshiping wwii war criminals in a shrine! now america is losing the dog chain on japan, its a very bad move. this japan dog will bite again!
    China and Korea can see it clearly. we will work together to defeat the evil japan! we, oversea chinese support you Xi!

    by: Scheneider from: B.R.Deutschland
    July 07, 2014 7:25 AM
    German chanceller Merkel is too intelligent and amicable to Japanese people to be involved in Sino plot to lambast Japan. She is not interested in Sino-Japan disputes over historical awareness or teritorial problems. She knows very well that Xi Jinping is forced to insult Japanese people just in order to maintain his regime because his opponents are aiming at his present position. Poor Chinese!
    In Response

    by: William Li from: canada
    July 07, 2014 4:42 PM
    Thank you all German friends, we are grateful for your transferring the advanced gas turbine technology to China which is essential to our new generation warships! Now we can use your advanced technology to build our own warship turbines! we will use these warships to destroy Japanese navy!
    Thank again, I love Germany!
    In Response

    by: SEATO
    July 07, 2014 1:52 PM
    Mr Xi picked the wrong person to condemn Japan's wartime past,a sensitive issue which Mrs Merkel 'd rather not want to talk about.Anyway,let's put the past behind and concentrate on the present and look forward to the future.China now poses serious security threats to World peace with its massive military build-ups and excessively illegal and unreasonable territorial claims.

    Japan's change of its pacifist constitutions and the introduction of Collective Self Defence are necessary and vital measures to safeguard not only Japan's sovereignty but also to deter China from waging wars on its smaller neighbours to seize more lands,seas and resources.China's criticism of Japan's imperial past is just a dirty smear campaign to discredit and isolate Japan,so that China can go on setting up a new World Order without being challenged.

    Has the Chinese government ever shown any remorse for the massacre of millions of Tibetans,Uighurs,Vietnamese and Chinese? No. So stop acting innocent.By the way,the Chinese never defeated the Japanese.The Americans did and they handed the ungrateful Chinese their independence back on a plate.The Chinese didn't want to be ruled over by foreigners,neither do the Uighurs,Tibetans and Mongols.So stop being hypocrites,get out of their lands and let them decide their own future

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