News / Asia

China's Role in Hong Kong Under Spotlight

Editorial staff members of the Ming Pao newspaper hold the front page of their newspaper with the headline on the former editor Kevin Lau, who was assaulted and injured during a protest outside the Ming Pao office in Hong Kong on Feb. 27, 2014. Editorial staff members of the Ming Pao newspaper hold the front page of their newspaper with the headline on the former editor Kevin Lau, who was assaulted and injured during a protest outside the Ming Pao office in Hong Kong on Feb. 27, 2014.
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Editorial staff members of the Ming Pao newspaper hold the front page of their newspaper with the headline on the former editor Kevin Lau, who was assaulted and injured during a protest outside the Ming Pao office in Hong Kong on Feb. 27, 2014.
Editorial staff members of the Ming Pao newspaper hold the front page of their newspaper with the headline on the former editor Kevin Lau, who was assaulted and injured during a protest outside the Ming Pao office in Hong Kong on Feb. 27, 2014.
Reuters
— A senior Chinese official on Thursday condemned the daylight stabbing of an influential newspaper editor that has exposed deep-rooted anxieties about possible interference by Beijing in the financial hub's affairs.
 
Police have made no arrests nor established any motive for the stabbing of Kevin Lau, a former chief editor of the Ming Pao newspaper, by two men, that left him fighting for his life.
 
Suspicions have spread, however, that powerful individuals from mainland China or pro-Beijing allies opposed to the city's push for full democracy, may have had a hand in the attack.
 
Former Ming Pao chief editor Ken Lau is pictured outside his office in Hong Kong on Jan. 31, 2014.Former Ming Pao chief editor Ken Lau is pictured outside his office in Hong Kong on Jan. 31, 2014.
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Former Ming Pao chief editor Ken Lau is pictured outside his office in Hong Kong on Jan. 31, 2014.
Former Ming Pao chief editor Ken Lau is pictured outside his office in Hong Kong on Jan. 31, 2014.
Lau's condition stabilized on Thursday and he was able to communicate by writing.
 
His stabbing could spark a backlash against Beijing.
 
Hong Kong, a former British colony that reverted to Chinese rule in 1997, enjoys considerable autonomy and broad freedom of speech as a capitalist hub.

It has been locked in a battle with Beijing's leaders to push through reforms that could culminate in an direct election for its leader in 2017.
 
Resentment has surged at attempts by Chinese authorities to tighten their grip on Hong Kong as well as proposals to control which candidates can stand in the 2017 poll.
 
A senior Chinese official in Hong Kong condemned the attack and urged authorities to crack the case swiftly.
 
“We're closely watching the attack...and strongly condemn the unlawful act of the criminals,” said Yang Jian, deputy director of China's representative office in Hong Kong, the Liaison Office.
 
“We firmly support the Hong Kong government to spare no effort, arrest the culprits and punish them in line with the law,” he said in remarks broadcast on local television.
 
The attack took place days after 6,000 protesters massed outside government headquarters to demand the city's leaders uphold press freedom against perceived intrusions from China.
 
It also followed Lau's replacement by a Malaysian editor with suspected pro-Beijing leanings. That move sparked a newsroom revolt.
 
Investigative reports on China's Elite
 
Some insiders at Ming Pao say recent exposes on assets hidden offshore by China's elite - in collaboration with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) - could have been a factor in the attack.
 
Martin Lee, a founder of the city's main opposition Democratic Party, said he could not rule out the possibility that political or criminal elements might have staged the attack, thinking they might “do Beijing a favor”.
 
“I suppose [some] people think in their own hearts this could have been related to Beijing,” Lee said by telephone.
 
“I don't see it unless it is some hot-headed fellow...thinking that what was actually done would be in accordance with the wishes of Beijing.”
 
Lee, together with newspaper publisher Jimmy Lai, was the target of a foiled assassination plot in 2008 as he led Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement into a heated election campaign.
 
The United States and European Union expressed concern over the assault and diplomats in Hong Kong said it underscored fears that the city's freedoms were being eroded.
 
“There's been a growing sense that, like the rule of law, they [media freedoms] are vital if Hong Kong is to maintain its role as an international center,” said one Western diplomat who declined to be identified.
 
“This case has only highlighted those fears. The Hong Kong government should know the importance of cracking this case, wherever it leads.”
 
Journalists were defiant and planned fresh weekend protests.
 
Around 100 Ming Pao reporters dressed in black gathered outside the paper's headquarters, holding up copies of Thursday's edition carrying a black masthead. Its owners offered HK$1 million ($130,000) as a reward for information.

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by: Frankie Fook-lu Leung from: Los Angeles
February 28, 2014 12:18 AM
There have been so much bad news involving the media professionals in Hong Kong. One wonders whether China is tightening the grip over Hong Kong, especially its hitherto daring media which have been at liberty to criticize and attack the Central government in addition to CY Leung's misadministration.

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