News / Africa

Congo Rebels Fire on UN Helicopter

U.N. peacekeepers at Kibati Three Towers, 5 km (3 miles) north of the North Kivu provincial capital Goma, Oct. 6, 2013.
U.N. peacekeepers at Kibati Three Towers, 5 km (3 miles) north of the North Kivu provincial capital Goma, Oct. 6, 2013.
Reuters
Insurgents in eastern Congo fired at a United Nations helicopter on Saturday after threatening to attack U.N. aircraft, further raising fears of a return to fighting in the volatile region.
    
Negotiations between the M23 rebels and the Democratic Republic of Congo's government restarted after U.N.-backed Congolese troops dealt the rebels a rare defeat in August.
    
But talks have made little progress on ending the latest conflict in a region where fighting, rooted in ethnicity and struggles over resources, has cost millions of lives in the past two decades.
    
The unarmed U.N. helicopter came under fire as it flew a reconnaissance mission over the M23 stronghold of Rumangabo, in mineral-rich northern Kivu province, the U.N. mission said.
    
The mission, known as MONUSCO, did not say whether the aircraft had been hit and no injuries were reported.
    
"M23 rebels will not prevent us from using the Congolese air space," Martin Kobler, the head of MONUSCO, said in a statement. "We shall continue doing all in our power to defend civilian populations including by using force if necessary."
    
Saturday's incident was the first of its kind since M23 issued a statement earlier this month threatening to destroy any U.N. aircraft flying over territory under its control.
    
"MONUSCO is a belligerent in this conflict now. It is not neutral. If they want to be part of the conflict we'll take them as part of the conflict," M23 spokesman Amani Kabashi said.
    
"We only fired warning shots to show MONUSCO that what they're doing is not fair," he added.
    
M23 launched its rebellion more than a year and a half ago, accusing the government of reneging on promises made in a 2009 peace deal.
    
It now controls swathes of territory along Congo's border with Uganda and Rwanda - which denies accusations by U.N. experts of supporting the rebel group. Talks have been taking place in Uganda.

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by: Name from: Location
October 12, 2013 9:01 PM
Most people think that the United Nations is a noble enterprise and they don’t understand the history and malignant character of the UN.

Christina Aguilera, Drew Barrymore and Sean Penn are probably unaware, even though they are UN Ambassadors to the World Food Program (WFP), that the intent of the UN is to implement one world government (see videos below). The UN WFP, which spreads GMOs in poor countries, is just one tool used for advancing the goals of Agenda 21, the overarching blueprint for depopulation and total control.




The WFP is corrupt to its core, as evidenced by a leaked UN document about Somalia which exposed that most of the aid goes to UN workers, Islamic militants and contractors.


The UN grew out of the League of Nations, which withered after Woodrow Wilson ( Edward House’s puppet), failed to convince Congress that international treaties and entangling alliances were good for America. Later, Rockefeller was able to advance the globalists’ cause and even donated 18 acres of land for the UN headquarters, located in New York. The Rockefellers have conceived and funded most of the destructive UN programs.

The origin of the food monopoly began with the Rockefeller Dynasty, even before they funded biotech research and industry.(1) The major GMO seed companies like Monsanto, DuPont, Dow, etc. are based in America and the patent laws that protect their monopoly are American.(2) Therefore, it should come as little surprise that the forces behind toxic GMOs promote GMOs internationally by way of the United Nations, using American tax dollars.


USAID (US Agency for International Development) is a an independent federal agency that is concerned with economic growth and advancing US foreign policy and interests, under the Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton. The agency is funded by taxpayer money. These interests are often private companies, like Monsanto, that champion so-called humanitarian aid in the name of the American people, using our tax dollars. USAID’s humanitarian efforts include imposing GMO seeds on poor nations by way of complex methods that circumvent the laws of poor countries.(3) Poor countries rarely stand up to the US government directly and are under constant pressure, plus they risk losing financial benefits from the US. So, these poor and transitional countries sell out their own farmers and the population suffers because GMO crops are unhealthy, GMO crops yields are lower and they foster monopolies, resulting in ongoing dependence.

USAID funds many NGOs (Non Governmental Organizations) that carry out USAID’s objectives- here is a list nearly 200 pages long- of the NGOs that are supported by US taxpayers.(4) It is interesting to note how many of these NGOs are concerned with ‘reproductive rights’, which is a fancy term for eugenics (selective breeding programs, often brutally enforced via forced sterilization and genocide). Further, USAID entered into a Public- Private Partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation, with the help of Bill Clinton, in order to use investments to “address” social and environmental problems, under the shelter of a tax free organization.(5) This means that the tax free organization will be able direct ‘impact’ investing which is designed to have an effect on social and environmental problems. In other words, be on the lookout for large investors using their overwhelming influence upon infrastructures, utilities, sewage systems, water sources, etc, which will likely lead to corporate privatization, and total control in pursuit of the final goals of Agenda 21.

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