News / USA

Rodman Seems to Blame US Missionary for N. Korean Captivity

Dennis Rodman speaks with fellow U.S. basketball players during a team meeting at a Pyongyang, North Korea hotel, Jan. 7, 2014.
Dennis Rodman speaks with fellow U.S. basketball players during a team meeting at a Pyongyang, North Korea hotel, Jan. 7, 2014.
Reuters
Dennis Rodman, in a television interview on Tuesday, appeared to blame Korean-American missionary Kenneth Bae for his captivity in North Korea, the latest in a series of controversial comments by the former U.S. basketball star.
 
During an expletive-ridden interview with CNN about his fourth trip to the reclusive state, Rodman seemed to say that Korean-American missionary Kenneth Bae, held in North Korea since May 2013 on charges of crimes against the state, was responsible for his own situation.
 
“If you understand what Kenneth Bae did .... Do you understand what he did in this country? Why is he held captive in this country?” Rodman said, declining to respond to questions to clarify what he meant.
 
Rodman brought a team of fellow former National Basketball Association stars to the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, to mark leader Kim Jong Un's birthday, which is believed to fall on Wednesday, though this has never been officially confirmed.
 
The games come just weeks after purge and execution of Kim's uncle Jang Song Thaek, who until then was one of the most powerful figures in North Korea. South Korean President Park Geun-hye has described recent events in North Korea as a “reign of terror.”
 
Asked about Rodman's comments, White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters, “I'm not going to dignify that outburst with a response,” and emphasized that the trip was “private travel” that was not endorsed by the U.S. government.
 
“I'm simply going to say that we remain gravely concerned about Kenneth Bae's health, and continue to urge DPRK authorities to grant his amnesty and immediate release on humanitarian grounds,” Carney said.

U.S. Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) speaks at a news conference in New York, Jan. 6, 2014.U.S. Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) speaks at a news conference in New York, Jan. 6, 2014.
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U.S. Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) speaks at a news conference in New York, Jan. 6, 2014.
U.S. Representative Eliot Engel (D-NY) speaks at a news conference in New York, Jan. 6, 2014.
U.S. Representative Eliot Engel, the leading Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, harshly criticized Rodman and the other Americans for what he called an “ill-advised” trip.
 
“As North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un continues to starve and oppress his citizens, it is unthinkable that a few fading celebrities would use such an opportunity to reward his brutal regime,” he said.

Rodman has faced both ridicule and harsh criticism for his trips to North Korea, which some U.S. politicians and activists view as serving only as fodder for North Korean propaganda.
 
But he defended his latest visit in the interview, saying it would help “open the door” to the reclusive state and was a “great idea for the world.”
 
“This is not about me. If I can open the door a little bit, just a little bit,” Rodman said. “It's all about the game. People love to do one thing - sports.”
 
He also lamented the criticism his visits have drawn.
 
“It's amazing how we thrive on negativity. Does anyone know this guy's only 31 years old?” he said of Kim, whom he calls his friend.
 
“Dennis, he could be 31, he could be 51,” said CNN interviewer Chris Cuomo. “He's just killed his uncle. He's holding an American hostage.”

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Comments
     
by: umbriel from: fort worth tx
January 07, 2014 8:17 PM
The CNN interviewer was so liberal in his criticism of Rodman and the inappropriate questions asked, that he actually may have endangered the lives of Rodman and the other American athletes. Even Rodman tried to explain this to the reporter, saying things like "I am here with 10 other American..." The reporter and his team were so smart they were stupid, as they patted themselves on the back for a good job on the put-down of Rodman. Idiots! Let Rodman do his thing, for all you know he may in the end do more good than just being a friend that likes basketball.

In Response

by: umbriel from: fort worth, tx
January 08, 2014 11:12 AM
Karen, no one has been charged with than in over 200 years, The main premise is proof that someone made verbal or written contact with another government that was in contradiction to US relations with that government. There is no such proof, as any political comments from Rodman are directed to the interviewer not to Kim Jong Un. Rodman only claims to have friendship with Kim because they both like basketball. Also note that Obama has not intervened in asking Rodman to quit his friendship.

In Response

by: Karen
January 08, 2014 7:16 AM
It appears that Rodman is in violation of the Logan Act. See: "Conducting Foreign Relations Without Authority:Congressional Research Services (Library of Congress-LOC) http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metacrs9143/m1/1/high_res_d/RL33265_2006Feb01.pdf. 2010 version available through LOC.

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