News / Middle East

Police Use Tear Gas to End Cairo Clashes

Egyptians react to tear gas fired by security forces to disperse a protest by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi demanding his reinstatement, in Cairo, Egypt, Dec. 6, 2013.
Egyptians react to tear gas fired by security forces to disperse a protest by supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi demanding his reinstatement, in Cairo, Egypt, Dec. 6, 2013.
Reuters
Egyptian police used tear gas on Friday to end clashes in Cairo between supporters and opponents of ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, the state-run news agency MENA said.
 
Morsi's supporters have been staging protests almost daily in many towns and cities across Egypt since the army deposed him on July 3 in response to mass protests against him.
 
The Cairo clashes took place in the well-to-do district of Mohandeseen, when a march by Brotherhood supporters came face-to-face with an opposing crowd.
 
The Morsi supporters were holding placards showing the four-finger logo of solidarity with those killed when security forces razed pro-Morsi protest camps in Cairo last August.
 
“Down, down with the military rule!” the protesters chanted.
 
  • Protesters run after police fired tear gas in Cairo, Dec. 6, 2013. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
  • Protesters set fire to debris in Cairo, Dec. 6, 2013. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
  • Smoke fills the sky over protests in Cairo, Dec. 6, 2013. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
  • Protesters pose for a photo in Cairo, Dec. 6, 2013. (Hamada Elrasam for VOA)
Similar pro-Brotherhood protests were staged in other parts of Cairo along with the Suez Canal cities of Suez and Port Said. Most of the protests set off from mosques after Friday's noon prayers.
 
Two weeks ago a new law was promulgated that banned protests near or originating from places of worship, and make it compulsory to seek Interior Ministry permission for protests.
 
A ministry official said no request had been filed for permission for Friday's protests.
 
Around 180 Brotherhood protesters were arrested during similar protests last Friday. On Thursday, three prominent liberal political activists were ordered to stand trial for protesting without permission.
 
Hundreds of people have been killed and thousands arrested since democratically-elected Morsi was deposed by the army on July 3.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
December 07, 2013 12:40 PM
What a lawless people! What happens to the courts, or are Egyptians, nay the Muslim Brotherhood, only educated in jungle justice? See who wanted to rule Egypt - a largely uneducated, barbaric group that has no regard for constituted legal system. No wonder Morsi went back to ruling by personally propounded decrees instead of relying on the established constitution. May I ask how these daily protests are funded, and how the protesters get funds to take care of themselves and families?

Sometimes it becomes good to use these events to find out who really have been receiving external funding to destabilize internal structures, and this opportunity should reveal to the interim administration those who should be behind bars as agents of destabilization. Such felons should be rounded up and charged for sabotaging the country - for it is an offense treason. If this is not done and they get round to fortifying their position during the electioneering, if they manage to convince or confuse people to vote them into elective offices with this impunity, the law that should have securely locked them away behind bars will be twisted and turned against the people who preach freedoms, liberty, rights and choices. The law will be twisted to defend the religion such that anything not suiting them becomes defamation of religion, blasphemy or enmity with their god.

This is the dangerous gravitation of allowing this seeming pro-Morsi/anti-military protests to linger. These protests must stop at all costs, even if it means expanding existing prisons to accommodate up to a quarter of the country now in that camp misleading the greater majority thereby giving hiding place and providing breeding ground for terrorism.


by: ali baba from: new york
December 06, 2013 6:53 PM
the police has to take any means necessary to restore safety of the country. we have enough of chaos from Muslim brotherhood. Muslim brotherhood want to destroy the country for their political agenda

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