News / Africa

Europe Bans South African Citrus Imports

FILE - Citrus fruits in Concord, New Hampshire, pictures on October 11, 2011.
FILE - Citrus fruits in Concord, New Hampshire, pictures on October 11, 2011.
Reuters
— The European Union on Thursday banned most imports of South African citrus for the remainder of this year over fears that a fungal disease found in dozens of shipments could spread to the 28-nation bloc.
 
The ban follows the interception of 36 citrus consignments this year from the EU's chief summer supplier that were contaminated with the fungal black spot disease, which is not currently found in Europe.
 
Earlier this month, Reuters reported that the European Commission was set to propose the ban following pressure from citrus growers in southern Europe.
 
“The introduction of citrus black spot into the EU territory would pose a serious threat to the EU's citrus-producing areas. For that reason, it is necessary to further restrict the import of citrus fruit from South Africa,” the Commission said in a statement confirming the move.
 
The ban will apply to all South African citrus shipments from regions where the disease is present, which covers the bulk of the country's production.
 
Initially the ban will apply only to the 2012-2013 harvest, which ended in October. It will, therefore, have little immediate impact because the exports to Europe dry up around October anyway.
 
But EU officials have warned that the restrictions could be extended into next year if an ongoing study by the bloc's food safety watchdog finds that the disease could take hold in Europe's estimated 500,000 hectares of citrus groves.
 
That would threaten South Africa's 600,000 tons of citrus fruit exports to Europe each year - mainly oranges, lemons, limes and tangerines - worth some 1 billion euros ($1.3 billion).
 
South Africa supplies about a third of the bloc's total citrus imports and is the main source of oranges for the juice drunk by consumers in Britain, Germany and France during the European summer months.
 
The ban comes at a sensitive time, because the European Union is seeking South Africa's support to unlock stalled trade deals with sub-Saharan Africa.
 
While harmless to humans, citrus black spot causes unsightly lesions on the fruit and leaves, reducing both harvest quality and quantity. There is no known cure, but fungicides can be used to control the spread of the disease.
 
It is found in many citrus-growing regions in the southern hemisphere as well as in China and the United States but has never established itself in Europe.
 
In a draft scientific opinion published in July, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) said the chance of citrus black spot taking in hold in Europe was “moderately likely”.
 
But it added there was a high level of uncertainty due to a lack of knowledge over how the disease would respond to the EU climate.
 
EFSA's assessment is due to be completed by the end of this year.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Gerald
November 29, 2013 11:00 PM
This is really incredible action taken by the European Union over an agricultural fungal infection known as "Black Spot", yet when compared to the 20,000 people who lost their lives in the Gukuruhundi campaign in Zimbabwe, to mention just but one, where was the European Union then?


by: Marko from: UK
November 28, 2013 1:01 PM
the whole African continent is a fungal disease...

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