News / USA

Former NYPD Sergeant Questions Sister's Killing by Police in Washington

Valarie (L) and Amy Carey, sisters of Miriam Carey, the woman involved in the Capitol Hill shooting, attend a news conference outside their home in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Oct. 4, 2013.
Valarie (L) and Amy Carey, sisters of Miriam Carey, the woman involved in the Capitol Hill shooting, attend a news conference outside their home in the Brooklyn borough of New York, Oct. 4, 2013.
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Reuters
— Police in Washington could have avoided shooting dead a woman pursued by officers in a car chase that led to the lockdown of the Capitol this week, the driver's sister, former New York police sergeant Valarie Carey, said late on Friday.

The family of Miriam Carey, whose one-year-old daughter Erica was in the car with her during the encounter with police on Thursday, has said she suffered from post-partum depression.

Carey, 34, a resident of Stamford, Connecticut, tried to drive her black Infiniti coupe through a barrier near the White House, then sped toward Capitol Hill, leading police on a high-speed chase that ended when her car got stuck on a median and police shot her.

"My sister could have been any person traveling in our capital," Valarie Carey told reporters outside her Brooklyn home. "Deadly physical force was not the ultimate recourse and it didn't have to be."

The chase and shooting came at a time of high political tension in the U.S. capital with Congress debating how to resolve the shutdown of the federal government. The Capitol was locked down after the shots were fired.

  • People run for cover as police converge to the site of a shooting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 3, 2013.
  • People take cover as gun shots were heard at the U.S. Capitol in Washington.
  • Police react on Capitol Hill after shots fired were reported.
  • Capitol police on alret outside the Capitol Hill in a lockdown after shots were fired near the building. (Diaa Bekheet/VOA)
  • A police helicopter carrying an injured police officer takes off the Capitol a few minutes after shots were fired near the building. (Diaa Bekheet/VOA)
  • Tourists react to the shooting outside the Capitol. (Sandra Lemaire/VOA)
  • Security outside the Capitol after shots were fired near the building. (Diaa Bekheet/VOA)
  • This view from the Russell Senate Office Building shows police converging on the scene of the shooting on Capitol Hill.
  • Emergency personnel stand near a police car after gunshots were fired outside the U.S. Capitol building.
  • Capitol Police officers look at a car following a shooting on Capitol Hill.
  • Capitol Police and medics take a shooting victim away on a stretcher at the site of a shooting on Capitol Hill.
  • Emergency personal help an injured person after a shooting on Capitol Hill.
  • Rescue personnel stand around a smashed Capitol Police vehicle following a shooting near the Capitol.
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation agents patrol after gunshots were fired outside the Capitol.

In another incident that caused alarm in Washington, a man appeared to have set himself on fire at the National Mall on Friday. He was listed in critical condition at a hospital.

Law enforcement sources said Carey did not shoot a gun and there was no indication she had one.

"I'm more than certain that there was no need for a gun to be used [by police] when there was no gunfire coming from the vehicle," Valarie Carey said. "I don't know how their protocols are in D.C., but I do know how they are in New York City."

Representatives from the Capitol Police and the District of Columbia's Metropolitan Police Department could not be reached for comment early on Saturday.

Depression

The Metropolitan Police Department said in a statement the shooting is under investigation by its internal affairs division with assistance from the Secret Service, the Capitol Police and the FBI.

A Secret Service officer was struck by Carey's car outside the White House during the incident on Thursday, said U.S. Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan.

A Capitol Police officer was hurt when his car struck a barricade during the mid-afternoon chase, which ranged over about a mile and a half (2.5 km) and lasted just a few minutes, officials said.

At the news conference in Brooklyn, Carey's other sister, Amy Carey-Jones, described to reporters the struggles her sibling had with post-partum depression.

"I can tell you that she was a law-abiding citizen, carefree and loving. She had a baby and she did suffer from post-partum depression with psychosis," Carey-Jones said, adding that her sister had been receiving medication and therapy.

The visibly emotional sisters held hands during the news conference. They had traveled to Washington earlier in the day to identify their sister to authorities with the use of photos, Carey-Jones said.

Investigators are focusing on whether Carey had mental problems that triggered her actions, said a U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Eric Sanders, an attorney for the Carey family and a former New York police officer, said the woman's relatives have not decided whether to take legal action.

Carey's daughter was unharmed when taken in by the District of Columbia Child and Family Services on Friday, said Mindy Good, a spokeswoman for the agency.

Carey was a licensed dental hygienist, according to records kept online by the state of Connecticut. She had been employed at a dental office but at the time of her death was no longer working there, said Carey-Jones, who declined to go into detail about her sister's work.

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by: Dr. Rochford from: USA
October 05, 2013 1:46 PM
We all know that our country has been taken over by Globalist forces, and that it is run by foreign banks. We all know, ON RECORD, that the CIA arms, funds, and trains Al Qaeda. The whole so-called "war on terror" is PHONY!!! We have become a police state in the new Fascist States of America, and YOU, the American citizen is the new "terrorist". Any wonder why the DHS, ON RECORD, has purchased millions of rounds of ammunition?? Any wonder why your local police department is now para-military?? Is it to fight the so-called "boogeyman", Al Qaeda that our own government created?? No, it is to use on YOU, when the Global Elites collapse the economy. So today what the media claims was a mentally unbalanced woman drove her car erratically around the White House and was then chased by dozens of police vehicles who seemed incapable of stopping her despite millions of dollars spent on fancy barricades that were supposed to stop a determined terrorist with presumably a better plan than just driving around real fast. Up to to Capitol Hill, round and round the fountain at the bottom of the Capitol building.

She seemed panicked to have all those police cars following her so she drove faster, around and around.

So…the cops just started shooting her! But she had a baby in the car with her. Too bad. Thankfully the baby was not killed in the hail of police bullets in one of the most densely populated parts of the Capitol.

Already the damage control is being laid on thick:

“The security perimeters worked,” D.C. Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier said Thursday evening. “They did exactly what they were supposed to do.”

Take America back, people, and wake up to the LIES of corporate media. Beware of the Stasi police state.


by: Opoku Appiah from: Ghana, west-africa
October 05, 2013 12:08 PM
The family should it go. Things like this always happen in life.

In Response

by: Ken from: D.C.
October 06, 2013 11:59 AM
They only happen when you have a CORRUPT, above the law, STASI POLICE, treating people like terrorists, whom our own government funds. Time for people to start doing independent, and alternative media research!

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