News / Middle East

Iraqi Army Bombs Falluja, Prepares for Ground Assault

Tribal fighter sits in Humvee during joint patrol with Iraqi security forces in Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Jan. 30, 2014.
Tribal fighter sits in Humvee during joint patrol with Iraqi security forces in Ramadi, 70 miles (115 kilometers) west of Baghdad, Jan. 30, 2014.
Reuters
The Iraqi army intensified its shelling of Falluja on Sunday in preparation for a ground assault to regain control over the city, which has been under the control of militants for a month.
 
Mostly Sunni Muslim anti-government fighters, among them insurgents linked to al-Qaida, overran Falluja in the Sunni-dominated western province of Anbar on Jan. 1, against a backdrop of deteriorating security across Iraq.
 
Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, whose Shi'ite-led government many in the Sunni minority accuse of discrimination, had held off an all-out offensive to give local tribesmen a chance to expel the militants themselves.
 
But security officials told Reuters on Saturday that a decision had been made to enter Falluja on Sunday.
 
“Orders have been issued to start shelling the city with artillery and planes to detect the potential abilities of militants inside Falluja and try to find a gap to get into the city,” a top security official told Reuters on Sunday.
 
“Troops and tribal fighters are stationed in their positions just 15 minutes outside Falluja.”
 
The official said militants had planted roadside bombs along the main roads into the city, and the army would use different routes to enter.
 
“We have finished all our preparations and are waiting for the final say, which must come from Maliki himself,” said a senior military commander.
 
Earlier on Sunday, security officials said Maliki had received phone calls from the ambassadors of several countries in the region urging him not to storm the city.

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by: john from: MA
February 04, 2014 1:04 AM
But Saddam killed his own people!

And to be constructive, the invasion was sealed the second Saddam sold oil for Euros instead of dollars.

In Response

by: John Watson from: London
February 05, 2014 1:19 PM
And because he, according to Yankee propaganda, killed his own people, there was a moral duty to bomb the entire country back to the Stone Age ( Baker dixit), to use Du and napalm; to murder hundreds of thousands of civilians.


by: David from: Canada
February 03, 2014 11:17 AM
As the Iraqi army prepare for a ground assault of Falluja- are they aware that this city was permanently and deliberately poisoned by the U. S. forces on their way out? That weapons were used in that city, that were banned under the Geneva Convention, (and every agreement since?) That in order to build and maintain a pipeline through that territory- that it first must be made uninhabitable?


by: Munir Mualem from: Jordan
February 01, 2014 7:26 PM
the legacy of the malicious British contamination in the Middle East is being dissolved. The British artificial borders separating Syria Jordan and Iraq are no longer. the Arabs in Israel must leave israel if israel want to survive this. Jordan and Egypt and Saudi Arabia must see that Israel is their savior - without israeli might they will all decompose into swamps of blood.

In Response

by: T.T. from: U.S.
February 03, 2014 11:00 AM
Thanks Dick Cheney. You and your "boy-Bush" did real well.

In Response

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
February 02, 2014 12:20 PM
It could be true the British concocted these city boundaries in the Middle East and Asia, Africa is not left out; but the British did not institute the wars of acrimony between these states. The earlier we told ourselves the truth about this matter, the earlier the world may begin to experience peace and quiet. A situation where nobody is in charge is a chaotic one. If nobody can call the aggrieved and wounded in Iraq, Pakistan or Afghanistan to order because there is no single voice that is recognized by the warring groups calls for a reappraisal. If all the OIC stands for is preach hate for Israel and denial of modern day freedoms and democracy, who really wants it? If it's happening in just one place, like the Ireland-Northern Ireland case, then one can say there is a mistake. But when it has become the hallmark of an organization to unleash mayhem, bloodshed and hate everywhere it is found, then there is definite trouble within such organization. Who can mention what needs to be done without causing an uproar? That is the only time they are united, not in the agreement of what is good, justifiable and acceptable in civilized societies.

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