News / Europe

German Defense Ministry: NATO to Discuss Reinforcing Troops in Poland

Polish marines of submarine ORP SEP watch instruments as the submarine dives during NATO Submarine Rescue Exercise Dynamic Monarch on Gdansk Bay,  near Hel in the Baltic Sea, May 22, 2014.
Polish marines of submarine ORP SEP watch instruments as the submarine dives during NATO Submarine Rescue Exercise Dynamic Monarch on Gdansk Bay, near Hel in the Baltic Sea, May 22, 2014.
Reuters
— NATO defence ministers will discuss temporarily reinforcing their forces in Poland when they meet in Brussels this week, a spokesman for the German defence ministry said on Sunday.

It has not been decided whether the 28-member alliance will actually reinforce its Multinational Corps Northeast in Szczecin, the spokesman added.

In April Poland's defence minister said Russia's military intervention in Ukraine's Crimea peninsula made it vital that NATO station significant numbers of troops in eastern Europe and ignore any objections Russia might have.

Russia says deployment of significant NATO forces close to Russia would violate the 1997 Founding Act, an agreement between Moscow and the alliance.

Eastern European states nervous about Russia after it annexed Ukraine's Crimea region and massed 40,000 troops on Ukraine's borders. NATO is trying to provide reassurance with temporary deployments of military forces and exercises.

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by: Charles Smyth from: Belfast
June 01, 2014 4:22 PM
Russia drew first blood, so Russia is in absolutely no position to complain. Moscow set all of this in motion by attempting to overturn the Budapest and Helsinki agreements, with regard to former Soviet territories, via the appeal of legal arguments that the Council of Europe rejected, since international law already provided a mechanism via which Kiev and Moscow could come to negotiated terms. Moscow reluctantly accepted this and proceeded to pay off Yanukovych with billions of Dollars, in order to establish a faux negotiation which would result in the outcome that Moscow wanted to achieve. An outcome that would at least appear to comply with international law.

Given that this was an obviously gross and ruthlessly cynical misuse of international law, that would have had extremely serious international consequences for the stability of the post-WW2 international order that is the alternative to the international order of the night before the outbreak of WW2, for example, this manoeuvre by Moscow was unacceptable to the US and the EU et al, and Yanukovych was encouraged to modify his position. Which he did, by hurriedly leaving office.

With its plans in tatters, Moscow retaliated by simply annexing the Crimean peninsula, with the intention to do likewise elsewhere in the region, by way of tactics such as the protecting "Russian Compatriots" manoeuvre, via the stay-behind ethnic Russians, of the Baltic states and Ukraine etc.

Thus the need to reinforce the NATO boots-on-the-ground as the option that is the alternative to more formidable option.


by: Forward Thinker
June 01, 2014 3:28 PM
That is rich! Russia stating that deployment of NATO troops to NATO countries is a violation of the Founding Act while invading other countries is not? What did Russia think the outcome of seizing Crimea would be? Did they think destabilizing of Easter Ukraine would go unnoticed?

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