News / USA

Report Sheds No Light on Motive of Connecticut School Killer

A bus traveling from Newtown, Connecticut, to Monroe stops in front of 26 angels along the roadside on the first day of classes for Sandy Hook Elementary School students since the December 14 shooting.
A bus traveling from Newtown, Connecticut, to Monroe stops in front of 26 angels along the roadside on the first day of classes for Sandy Hook Elementary School students since the December 14 shooting.
Reuters
The man who killed 26 people including 20 children in an attack on Sandy Hook Elementary School almost a year ago acted alone and his motive may never be known, according to an investigative report released on Monday.
 
The state attorney's report said that the criminal investigation into the shooting by 20-year-old Adam Lanza, who murdered his mother before attacking the school and ended the rampage by turning his gun on himself is now closed and no charges will be brought.
 
Investigators said there was evidence that Lanza planned his rampage, but did not discuss his plans with others.
 
“The obvious question that remains is: 'Why did the shooter murder twenty-seven people, including twenty children?' Unfortunately, that question may never be answered conclusively,” the report said.
 
While the large informal memorials that arose in this town of 27,000 residents in the days after the shooting have long been removed, small commemorations are sprinkled throughout the sprawling town.
 
Last year, on the morning of Dec. 14, Lanza shot and killed his mother, Nancy Lanza, in her bed in their Newtown home, and then forced his way into Sandy Hook, which he once attended.
 
In a series of emails to Newtown parents last week, John Reed, the town's interim schools superintendent, addressed the report's release and cautioned parents to be mindful of their children's' emotional well-being.
 
“By supporting one another, we will work our way through these challenging circumstances,” Reed said.
 
A Connecticut law passed earlier this year said that some evidence from the state's investigation will never be made available to the public.
 
The law, passed in response to the shooting, prohibits the release of photographs, film, video and other visual images showing a homicide victim if they can “reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy of the victim or the victim's surviving family members.”

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by: Dr. Lavrin M.d. from: USA
November 26, 2013 9:24 AM
Why do the comments posted appear to be more informative than the "article" itself??? Clearly, Sandy Hook was a coverup, and only a gun-grabbing wench like Diane Feinstein would go along with the medias narrative. To have the TRUTH, and not have some twisted paradigm, one only needs to do independent research to find out the media will go to great lengths to lead the uninformed person down a story of LIES.

by: Mrs. Denin from: New Haven, CT
November 25, 2013 9:54 PM
In all other shootings (and many more), video footage and still images are quickly released to the media for the purpose of blasting these images into the minds of viewers everywhere. Video is played over and over again in the media with the hopes that people will be driven into a state of total irrational fear. It’s also, of course, a good way to cause copycat massacres which result in even more news ratings.
And yet with Sandy Hook, we see no video footage at all. Very fishy!! Three possible explanations:

Explanation #1) They are busy doctoring the video footage to insert an AR-15 into the video frame by frame. The technology to do this has existed for many years as we all saw with the movie Forrest Gump, where actor Tom Hanks was shown shaking the hand of JFK.

Explanation #2) No video footage was ever taken by the school. This is absurd, as it’s already on the record that the Sandy Hook school had installed a video security system to monitor anyone entering or leaving the school. In fact, it’s even more interesting than that: this school security policy letter was sent to parents at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year, and it clearly states: …the office staff will use a visual monitoring system to allow entry. Doors will be locked at approximately 9:30 a.m. Any student arriving after that time must be walked into the building and signed in at the office…It’s quite clear that if a student approached the school carrying an AR-15 rifle, he would not have been allowed entry! The only way he could have entered the school with the security system in place was to hide handguns under his clothes. You cannot hide an AR-15 rifle in a pocket, obviously.

Explanation #3) The video footage has been seized by the government and “archived” along with the footage of the missile that struck the Pentagon during the 9/11 attacks. Where is all that video footage? It was all seized and completely hidden from public view.

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