News / Asia

North Korea: 'Wait and See' on New Nuclear Test

Visitors watch North Korean side at unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, April 1, 2014.
Visitors watch North Korean side at unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, April 1, 2014.
Reuters
North Korea said on Friday that the world would have to "wait and see" when asked for details of "a new form" of nuclear test it threatened to carry out after the United Nations Security Council condemned Pyongyang's recent ballistic missile launch.

North Korea (DPRK) fired two medium-range Rodong ballistic missiles into the sea on March 26. Its first firing in four years of mid-range missiles that can hit Japan followed a series of short-range rocket launches over the past two months.

Members of the Security Council on March 27 condemned the move as a violation of U.N. resolutions and that it would continue discussions on an "appropriate response."

Pyongyang reacted on Sunday with a threat to conduct what it called "a new form of nuclear test."

"The DPRK made it very clear, we will carry out a new form of nuclear test. But I recommend you to wait and see what it is," North Korea's Deputy U.N. Ambassador Ri Tong Il said on Friday during the normally reclusive state's third U.N. news conference this year.

Ballistic missile launches are banned under U.N. Security Council resolutions adopted in response to North Korea's multiple nuclear tests and rocket firings. The council expanded its existing sanctions after Pyongyang's February 2013 atomic test, its third nuclear detonation since 2006.

The Security Council's sanctions on Pyongyang target the country's missile and nuclear programs and attempt to punish North Korea's reclusive leadership through a ban on the export of luxury goods to the country.

Ri accused the United States of being "hell bent on regime change" in North Korea by blaming its leaders for human rights violations. He also said Washington was blocking a bid for the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula by ignoring Pyongyang proposals, so it can maintain military presence in the region.

US 'going around crazy'

"The U.S. is hell bent on eliminating the DPRK politically, isolating DPRK economically and annihilating the DPRK militarily," Ri told reporters. "There is a great question mark why the U.S. is hell bent on increasing the tension, ignoring the DPRK proposals, very important for peace and security."

The U.S. mission to the United Nations did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Ri's accusations.

U.N. rights investigators said in February that North Korean security chiefs and possibly Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un himself should be tried for ordering systematic torture, starvation and killings, saying the crimes were "strikingly similar" to those committed in World War Two.

"There is no human rights situation existing in the DPRK," Ri said. "The DPRK has the best social system in the world, it is based on one family as a country, fully united around our leadership, the people and the party."

"The U.S. is behaving as if it is a human rights judge while it should be subjected to the International Criminal Court more than anybody else. They made a lot of crimes," he said, citing U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Ri criticized military drills by the United States and South Korea, called Foal Eagle and due to end on April 18. North Korea has traditionally called for the joint exercises to be called off, seeing them as a prelude to invasion.

"The U.S. is now going around crazy with these joint military drills without caring about peace and security on the Korean peninsula," Ri said.

The annual drills have been conducted for decades without a major incident. The United States and South Korea stress that the exercises are purely defensive and aimed at testing readiness against any possible North Korean aggression.

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Comments
     
by: Joseph Effiong from: uyo - nigeria
April 05, 2014 5:58 AM
Look at south Korea growing economically because of their peaceful nature . But north Korea was founded by senseless leaders. The inferior leader of kim's family is a disease in the blood of north Korean people. It will be difficult for this north Korea to prosper because there is no moment of rethink at least for a week of peaceful relationship with south Korea .
In Response

by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
April 05, 2014 3:53 PM
I am quite sure SK would be as poor as NK, if same sanctions are upon SK, no matter it's democracy or communism.

by: Not Again from: Canada
April 04, 2014 10:09 PM
Mr. Ri Tong should realize that it is North Korea (NK) that causes all these disturbances and increased instability by continuously making threats. And as far as high yield or hydrogen bombs, it is nothing new nor unexpected; if NK gets its calculations wrong, they will make a hell of a bad environmental mess, affecting a wide area; clearly demonstrating a significant lack of understanding of positive human values; and NK will just go down further in the estimate of its contribution to humanity and to its own people. Such "surprise tests", will potentially have a very negative effect, especially if the calculations get the test wrong, they have a serious potential to negatively affect not only NK/SK but also China, and Russia, radiation/dust does not respect borders. Let us hope it is not a test involving enriched material. Rather than wasting resources on a path that will lead to the dark ages, they would be better off spending the resources on improving the economy of NK. A better test and surprise would be if NK develops an advanced electric car, that can be sold around the world, or other worthwhile useful product.
In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
April 05, 2014 1:07 AM
TRUTHFULLY? .... Kim Jong Un and North Korea developed the nuclear bombs for defensive reasons, against the US and NATO, the most aggressor countries in the world, that has started more wars, and been in more wars, on one side or the other, than any country since WW2...
The North Koreans won't attack anybody, because they don't posses any air or sea power to match the US and NATO, nor any way to supply a military offense with supplies, (if they had any?), and the US and NATO is making-up the North Korean threat to keep US troops in South Korea, to threaten China...
REALLY? .... How many countries has the US and the 27 other countries of NATO attacked, that possessed nuclear bombs? .... (DID YOU SAY NONE?) .... Those threats of North Korean nuclear bombs, will keep the US and NATO at bay.... REALLY

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