News / Europe

Putin Calls for Ukraine Cease-fire

  • Emergency workers carry a stretcher with a victim's body in a bag at the crash site of a Malaysia Airlines jet near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, July 19, 2014.
  • Flowers are placed on a plane engine at the crash site of a Malaysia Airlines jet near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, July 19, 2014.
  • A pro-Russian fighter guards the crash site of a Malaysia Airlines jet near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, July 19, 2014.
  • A woman holds an anti-Putin placard to protest the downing of Malaysia Airlines MH17 in Sydney, Australia, July 19, 2014.
  • Passengers' belongings are pictured at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 before a visit by OSCE monitors, near the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region, July 18, 2014.
  • People bring flowers and candles to the Dutch embassy in Kyiv, Ukraine, to commemorate the victims of the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash.
  • People walk amongst the debris at the crash site of a passenger plane near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine.
  • A relative of passengers on flight MH17 cries as he waits in a bus to be transported to an unknown location to receive more information, at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • People take photos of a screen showing arrival details of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 (C) at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang.
  • A woman reacts to news regarding a Malaysia Airlines plane that crashed in eastern Ukraine at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang, Malaysia.
  • The upper floor of Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, is closed for media and reserved for family and relatives of Malaysia Airlines flight MH-17.
  • A relative walks past members of the press as he arrives at Schiphol airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
  • Smoke rises up at a crash site of a passenger plane, near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine.
  • A part of the wreckage of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane is seen after it crashed near the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region.
  • The site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash is seen near the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region.
  • The site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash is seen near the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region.
  • The site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash is seen at the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region.

Malaysian Airliner Crashes in Eastern Ukraine

VOA News

As the world continued to react to the crash of a Malaysian airliner over war-torn eastern Ukraine, Russia's president called Friday for an immediate cease-fire, while his foreign minister warned that Russia may respond in kind to cross-border shelling from Ukraine.

"We proceed from the fact that peace should prevail on Ukrainian soil as soon as possible, that direct contacts between all parties to the conflict must be established as quickly as possible," President Vladimir Putin said Friday about the conflict between Ukraine's government and pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine.

After Thursday's crash of the Boeing 777, which Kyiv says was shot down by pro-Russian militants, Putin put the blame on Ukraine's government. He said the incident "would not have happened had Kyiv not, in his words, "renewed hostilities" in southeastern Ukraine. He added that the state on whose territory the incident occurred was, in his words, "responsible for this awful tragedy."

An "act of terrorism"

Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko said Thursday that the airliner was brought down by an "act of terrorism," hinting at the involvement of separatists. Late last month, Poroshenko renewed a military offensive against the rebels in eastern Ukraine after a 10-day unilateral cease-fire, charging that rebel forces had used the time to regroup and had launched numerous attacks during that truce in which Ukrainian servicemen were killed.

Kyiv, along with Washington and its European allies, have accused Russia of allowing arms and fighters to flow across its border to the separatists.

And on Friday, the head of Ukraine's security service, Valentyn Nalyvaichenko, claimed that monitored conversations between separatists showed that the Buk anti-aircraft missile system used to shoot down the Malaysian airliner was manned by a crew of three Russian servicemen who had crossed into Ukraine before that attack.

U.S. officials also say the plane was brought down Thursday by a surface-to-air missile.  U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power said Friday that the missile system was likely operated from a "separatist-held location in eastern Ukraine," and that technical assistance from Russia to those who fired it cannot be ruled out.

The rebels have denied responsibility for downing the airliner and blamed government forces.

Lavrov's warning

Meanwhile, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov told a state television channel that Russia might launch strikes against military "firing positions" inside Ukraine if they are involved in "deliberate" cross-border attacks.  

On Sunday, Russia threatened Ukraine with “irreversible consequences” after a man in a Russian border town was killed by a shell fired from Ukraine. Kyiv called the accusation its forces had fired across the border “total nonsense” and suggested the attack could have been the work of rebels trying to provoke Moscow to intervene on their behalf.

Earlier this week, the rebels claimed responsibility for shooting down a Ukrainian military An-26 transport plane and Su-25 fighter, as well as damaging another Su-25. Rebels also claimed in social media reports posted around the time the Malaysian airliner crash Thursday that they had shot down another An-26. They said the shoot-down had occurred in the same area where the airliner crashed, leading to speculation that they had downed the Boeing 777 thinking it was a Ukrainian military plane.

The Ukrainian government released what it said was intercepted phone calls between rebels, and between a rebel commander and a Russian intelligence officer, in which the downing of the plane was discussed, with some of those in the conversation reporting that it was a civilian aircraft.

  • Vice President Joe Biden:  ``(The plane) apparently has been shot down - shot down, not an accident, blown out of the sky.''
  • President Vladimir Putin: ``This tragedy would not have happened if there had been peace on that land, or in any case if military operations in southeastern Ukraine had not been renewed. And without doubt, the government of the territory on which it happened bears responsibility for this frightening tragedy. We will do everything that we can so that an objective picture of what happened can be achieved. This is a completely unacceptable thing.''
  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel: ``We need to start an independent investigation as quickly as possible. A ceasefire is needed for that and it's important that those responsible are bought to justice. There are many indications that the plane was shot down, so we have to take things very seriously.  (I am making) a very clear call for the Russian president and government to make their contribution to bringing about a political solution.''
  • Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak: ``If it transpires that the plane was indeed shot down, we insist that the perpetrators must swiftly be brought to justice.''
  • Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko:  ``(The) tragedy showed again that terrorism is not localized, but a world problem. And the external aggression against Ukraine is not just our problem, but a threat to European and global security.''
  • Aleksandr Borodai, Prime Minister of the self proclaimed 'Donetsk People's Republic: ``Apparently, it's a passenger airliner ... truly shot down  by the Ukrainian Air Force.''
  • Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott: ``We all know that there are problems in Ukraine. We also know who is very substantially to blame for those problems, and the idea that Russia can somehow say that none of this had anything to do with them because it happened in Ukrainian air space frankly does not stand up to any serious scrutiny.''

 

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Comment Sorting
Comment on this forum (1)
Comments
     
by: Van TC from: Malaysia
July 18, 2014 1:16 PM
Russia foolishness was exposed to the world now by her assistance to the terrorists groups who acts on the advice of shameful Russia against Ukraine. How shameful it is for Russia to be being exposed of her secret acts. Stupid Russia!

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