News / Europe

Russian Lawmaker Wants to Take Children Away from Gay Parents

Gay rights activists hold a banner reading 'Homophobia - the religion of bullies' during their action in protest at homophobia, on Red Square in Moscow, Russia, July 14, 2013.
Gay rights activists hold a banner reading 'Homophobia - the religion of bullies' during their action in protest at homophobia, on Red Square in Moscow, Russia, July 14, 2013.
Reuters
A member of Russian President Vladimir Putin's ruling party tabled a draft law on Thursday to take children away from homosexual parents, adding to a raft of measures that rights activists say are undermining gay rights.
 
The draft law, which follows legislation banning gay “propaganda”, would add homosexuality to a list of conditions including drug and child abuse that can lead to parents being stripped of custody over their children.
 
The proposal highlights the more socially hardline course that Putin has charted in his third presidential term as he seeks to boost support among conservative voters.
 
“In the case when a parent has sexual contact with people of their own gender, the damage that can be inflicted on the psyche of a child is enormous,” Alexei Zhuravlyov, the author of the draft, wrote in submitting it to the Russian parliament's lower house, or Duma.
 
He said that between 5 and 7 percent of people across Russia were of “non-traditional” sexual orientation and that at least a third of those had children.
 
It was not clear if Zhuravlyov's proposal had a strong chance of becoming law, but it follows other legislation signed by Putin that rights activists and Western governments said are discriminatory against homosexuals.
 
Homosexuality was decriminalized after the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union, but many Russians still view it as either an affliction that requires medical treatment or a crime deserving of prosecution.
 
Putin said this week that Russia's love for composer Pyotr Tchaikovsky, who was homosexual, was proof that the country appreciated its gay population.
 
But gay activists said they are being turned into scapegoats for problems including low birth rates and an HIV/AIDS epidemic that is closely tied to drug use.
 
One new law prevents them from adopting children. Another on so-called gay “propaganda”, which bans advocating non-traditional sexual relations around children, has caused an uproar in the West and triggered calls for a boycott of Russia's 2014 Winter Olympics in the Black Sea resort town of Sochi.
 
Putin has struck an increasingly conservative tone after protests against his 13-year rule, which have arisen mostly in Moscow and other larger cities in late 2011 and 2012, and rights activists accuse him of cracking down on dissent.

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by: Dr. Norman C. Murphy from: Oceano, CA USA
September 05, 2013 6:58 PM
The Russians, under Putin, are delusional if they believe anyone chooses to be homosexual or heterosexual. There are numerous well peer reviewed scientific articles on how brain sex, genital sex, and chromosomal sex can be different than sex of assignment at birth. For a full article with footnotes and over 450 authoritative references on the subject titled: "Sexual Orientation: Science and Society" email dr.murphy@att.net. Try science and medical knowledge over ignorance or be doomed to the psychiatric problems that are created when natural sexual orientation is inhibited (i.e., depression, schizophrenia, anxiety, homophobia, low academic achievement when bullied, . . . ad infinitum.) Russia's mental health problems are on the rise now, wait until the aftermath of their ignorance.
In Response

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
September 06, 2013 7:56 AM
Hey, let's have some decency here! You may have carried out a lot of research on this matter, but your result is grossly misleading. No one will agree with your findings here even if you quote the most wanted scientist in the world. Reason: this issue is a new phenomenon. Some decades ago it was not as pronounced as it is today. The exceptional mention of this problem was in Sodom and Gomorrah where morality was thrown to the birds and life was as free as of the animals in the wild.

That led to women (including pregnant ones), not wanting to be left out of the unbridled orgies of the time, overindulged in alcohol and drugs which resulted in defective formation of fetuses, some of the defects were sexual malformations that manifested in this form. Today too, we know that because of same behavioral pattern adopted by the women of USA and most of Europe, a repeat of the Sodom and Gomorrah days is most possible. However, the rapid growth of the number of homosexuals in Europe and USA calls for some form of examination - whether there is something else pushing a change of sexuality in peoples out there, especially those in the entertainment industry.

Here extraneous forces otherwise supernatural or superhuman forces have been indicted. Your submission rather proved a part of human subconsciousness that can be manipulated to achieve these results of change of sexuality. How you people are doing it out there, and why you want the whole world to adhere to, or accept it, is the problem the world is facing with the phenomenon. What about morality? What about respect for freedom of choice, association and interaction? Homosexuals are free to express themselves, why should other people not also say what they want or do not want? These are the questions you must answer to settle this matter amicably.

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