News / Africa

Sudan Official: Christian Woman Not Re-Arrested

FILE - Meriam Ibrahim, sitting next to Martin, her 18-month-old son, holds the newborn daughter she gave birth to in jail in May at a prison in Khartoum, Sudan.
FILE - Meriam Ibrahim, sitting next to Martin, her 18-month-old son, holds the newborn daughter she gave birth to in jail in May at a prison in Khartoum, Sudan.
VOA News
A Sudanese foreign ministry official is denying reports that a Christian woman accused of apostasy was re-arrested a day after an appeals court ordered her release from prison.

In a VOA interview, Dr. Sadek El Magli said officials instead took Meriam Yahya Ibrahim to an undisclosed location Tuesday to protect her from relatives angered by the court decision.

El Magli, a former Sudanese ambassador, said the woman may have already left Sudan.  

Earlier Tuesday, lawyers for Ibrahim said security officials had arrested her at the Khartoum airport as she tried to board a flight with her family to leave Sudan.  

They said officials took Ibrahim, her husband Daniel Wani, and their two young children to a security facility near the airport.  Wani is an American citizen.

At the U.S. State Department, spokeswoman Marie Harf said U.S. officials had received word that Ibrahim had been released, but could not confirm if the family had left the country.

"The State Department has been informed by the Sudanese government that the family was temporarily detained at the airport for several hours by the government for questioning over issues related to their travel and, I think, travel documents," she said. "They have not been arrested. The government has assured us of their safety."

The case has drawn international attention. In May, Ibrahim was sentenced to death by hanging on her conviction of apostasy for refusing to abandon her Christian faith.  

The conviction stemmed from a Sudanese law stating children of Muslim fathers are considered Muslim.  Ibrahim was born to a Christian mother and a Muslim father. She was brought up as a Christian after her father left the family.

A court also sentenced Ibrahim to 100 lashes on charges of adultery for marrying Wani, who is a Christian.  Under Sudanese law, marriage between Muslims and non-Muslims is not permitted.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters, AFP and AP.

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by: Merkado from: Melbourne
June 25, 2014 8:36 AM
The world is observing as with complicity what the islamic regime is doing to women. Freedom of religion is not respected in muslim countries and they want to expand islam in christian countries or in nations with other beliefs. They are totally wrong if they applaude if people of other faiths join islam and mourn if a muslim becomes christian. Executing those who reject islam is the weak spot of islam and people are kept captives by terror and by it was obvious that by the sword that the religion crossed the continents since its beginning.

Today we see that picture thru the terrorist attacks between sunnis and shias and the no muslims. It is a shame that all these are done mainly muslims among themselves each group chanting Allah akbar and the blood of muslims and no-muslims, children, women and innocent people is shed. Is it always the blood of Americans or christians that is shed in Bagdad, Kaboul, Tehran or Islamabad? Why this hatred if islam is Allah? Otherwise, Islam is from Shetwan!

by: Ngundeng Taath from: Akobo,South Sudan
June 25, 2014 3:23 AM
Christianity doesn't force it believers why islam have law like parallel government .
Remember Ten Commandment .Don't judge any one

by: Benson Kane from: Melbourne
June 25, 2014 12:09 AM
While Muslims are persecuting Christians all over the world, and at the same time, creating havoc with terrorism all over the world as well .Our governments here in Australia, are allowing their population, their mosques,and their religion to flourish and grow ,even now that at least 150, Muslims offsprings that we know off so far ,have left Australia and gone offshore to fight in favor of terrorism. ....Sic...

by: John
June 24, 2014 10:55 PM
I must admit I'm confused as to why they'd NOT want to see her leave the country. It therefore seems probable that the official reassurances are true.

by: ali baba from: new york
June 24, 2014 10:20 PM
The husband and his child are American Citizen. if the Sudan Gov., which is well known for not respect the human right ,The Sudan Gov. may killed this woman in secret ,. unless that woman surface, the possibility of executed her is a valid possibility.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
June 24, 2014 11:43 AM
Some religions belong to dustbins and no longer suitable for humans. Maybe they served some purpose in the stone age, medieval and/or middle ages to help keep families together because of the hostility of the time. In the present dispensation, such conditions no longer obtain and so.... But you can see how this has caused or brought about boko haram insurgency in the northeast of Nigeria, and other terrorist groups elsewhere, like al qaida, etc.

Death sentence? Just imagine it...! because someone wants to serve God. Now the lesson to learn from this is this: When God created the world He made arrangement for man's relationship with him called religion. As with every twelve and a Judas, the devil also brought in something resembling true worship. But how can we differentiate the genuine one from the fake one? Only ONE thing stands between: the God who fights his battles and one whom adherents must fight for to sustain.

The God who is pro-life and the one destructive; the God who allows choices and wisdom and the one that lacks all of these. Thus Gideon's father said to him, "you are a man, do you fight for Baal? If Baal is god, let him fight for himself". That earned him the nickname "Jerubaal". Any deity that cannot sustain self by the good to humanity but must be sustained by death sentence to those who would opt out is not God. Q.E.D.
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
June 24, 2014 10:28 PM
When Somali is turn out by starvation and many people lost their lives from lack of food .George H bush, sent food and troops to distribute food for the starving people. and US get back an ambush that killed several American soldiers. Your people are not thankful and stab from the back for people who you give hand.
In Response

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
June 24, 2014 2:41 PM
Where's the God you think is pro-life? Does your God protect us all? Where that God was when all African men and women herded like wild animals and shipped to America for bible based slavery.
Holocaust- more than six million Jews were slaughtered in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.
Christians gave blessing for the atomic bombing of Japan, because Japanese were considered non Christians.
Listen, bro, both religions, I mean Islam's Quran and Christian's bible are bogus, violent and evil. Not good for us, Africans.

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