News / Africa

South Sudan Rebels Reject Plan to Unblock Peace Talks

Head of the rebel delegation General Taban Deng Gai, addresses journalists during South Sudan's negotiations in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, Jan. 8, 2014.
Head of the rebel delegation General Taban Deng Gai, addresses journalists during South Sudan's negotiations in Ethiopia's capital Addis Ababa, Jan. 8, 2014.
Reuters
South Sudanese rebels turned down on Wednesday a government plan to end a dispute over detainees and unblock peace talks aimed at halting violence that has killed at least 1,000 people in the world's youngest state.

Three weeks of fighting, often along ethnic faultlines, has pitted President Salva Kiir's SPLA government forces against the rebels loyal to former vice president Riek Machar and brought the oil exporting nation close to civil war.

Both sides met face-to-face for a first time on Tuesday in Addis Ababa in a bid to agree a ceasefire but faced new delays after Kiir refused a rebel demand to release 11 detainees, who were arrested last year over an alleged coup plot.

On Wednesday, the government proposed to shift the peace talks to the United Nations compound in Juba, enabling the 11 detainees to attend the negotiations during the day and return to custody in the evening.

"They seem to have rejected that,'' South Sudan's  presidential spokesman Ateny Wek Ateny said.

Taban Deng Gai, the head of the opposition delegation at the Addis Ababa talks, said Juba was not a good venue. "I don't think that will be accepted from this side because Juba is a big prison,'' he said.

The fighting is the worst in South Sudan since it won independence from Sudan in 2011 in a peace deal that ended one of Africa's longest civil wars. It has also displaced over 200,000 people and cut oil exports.

Both sides on Wednesday reported fighting around Bor, north of Juba.

Garang boys
       
Peter Biar Ajak, Executive Director of the Juba-based Center for Strategic Analyses and Research, said most of the 11 detainees were not outright Machar supporters, but part of a group made up of ex-comrades of the late Sudanese liberation hero John Garang, known as the "Garang Boys''.

"You are not going to have a lasting solution without this group being involved,'' Ajak told Reuters by phone, adding that Machar would need the backing of the group to have any hope of gaining wide support outside his own Nuer ethnic group.

The rebels had initially demanded the release of the detainees before the talks, but have since agreed to negotiate a ceasefire and the status of the detainees.\

"It is a decision that we will have to make as a group,''  Mabior said when asked whether Machar's delegation would withdraw from the talks if the detainees were not freed.

Both sides were due to discuss their positions on Wednesday, but this did not take place, because the delegates were awaiting the return From Juba of envoys of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), a regional grouping of east African nations that initiated the talks.

The envoys had travelled to Juba where they tried in vain to persuade Kiir to free the detainees, and arrived back in Addis on Wednesday evening.

Fighting near Bor

Lul Ruai Koang, military spokesman for the opposition, told journalists in Addis that rebel forces had attacked government troops near the town of Bor, near the capital.

Koang said his troops were near Juba and would await a command from the rebels' political leaders to attack the town if the peace talks break down. "We are ready, and once we are told what to do we'll get into action,'' he said.

In Juba, the government's military spokesman Philip Aguer said there had been fighting around Bor, and elsewhere, including the Upper Nile state where some of the country's oil fields are located.

Politician David Yau Yau, who has in the past led a rebellion against South Sudan's army in the vast Jonglei state had joined the government troops, Aguer said. Yau Yau was not immediately available to comment.

The lack of progress in the peace talks has unnerved foreign powers, who worry that South Sudan could spiral into full-blown civil war.

China, the biggest investor in South Sudan's oil industry through state-owned Chinese oil giants National Petroleum Corp (CNPC) and Sinopec, called on Monday for an immediate ceasefire. The unrest has forced the government to cut oil production by about a fifth.

All of landlocked South Sudan's oil is piped through its northern neighbor, providing vital hard currency in transit fees for Khartoum. Oil major BP estimates that South Sudan holds sub-Saharan Africa's third-largest reserves.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Anonymous
January 09, 2014 5:21 PM
There's no peace if kirr not step down cowboy


by: Stephen Tor Gany from: Juba
January 08, 2014 11:12 PM
We really need a peaceful solution for this situation, we had been in UNMISS now for the last three weeks, I urge all the leaders from both sides to accept immediately the conditions given from each party.


by: Ulo Kenneth from: Imo state Nigeria
January 08, 2014 8:06 PM
i wonder what benefit people derive by ingaging in war. In every war, number of lives are lost, property distroyed & every afare scatered & unorganised in mater that should have resolved peacefully. I call on all the parties involved to follow the line of peace. That's no alternative to peace.

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