News / Middle East

Five Killed in Egypt Opposition Protests

Supporters of deposed President Mohamed Mursi and the Muslim Brotherhood clash with anti-Mursi protesters during a march in Cairo, Oct. 4, 2013.
Supporters of deposed President Mohamed Mursi and the Muslim Brotherhood clash with anti-Mursi protesters during a march in Cairo, Oct. 4, 2013.
Reuters
— Five people were killed in clashes on Friday as supporters of deposed President President Mohamed Morsi took to the streets of Cairo and other cities to demand the end of army-backed rule.
 
The marches were the most ambitious attempt by the Muslim Brotherhood to press its demands since August 14, when authorities smashed two pro-Morsi sit-ins in Cairo and then declared a state of emergency and imposed a curfew.
 
An Egyptian army vehicle fired live rounds in the direction of Brotherhood supporters who had been pushed away from Cairo's Tahrir Square by security forces, a Reuters witness said.
 
Four people were shot dead in clashes in the southern city of Assuit, medical and health sources said. It was not clear which side they were on.
 
Medical sources in Cairo said a Brotherhood supporter had died from a gunshot wound in clashes in the capital.
 
Onlookers threw rocks at the pro-Morsi protesters, who hurled them back. Riot police earlier fired tear gas to push back the march.
 
Thousands of protesters headed toward the site of a former Brotherhood protest camp in northeast Cairo which was crushed by security forces in August. By late afternoon, protesters had retreated from the area.
 
Members of the Brotherhood, which has been banned by court order, tried to reach the presidential palace but were turned back by police.
 
The state news agency said protesters failed to reach the defense ministry and a Republican Guard facility.
 
Fighting also erupted in Egypt's second city Alexandria and two Nile Delta cities.
 
The Brotherhood won every election after a popular uprising ousted autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011, but became deeply unpopular under Morsi's rule.
 
Morsi was accused of trying to give himself sweeping powers and entrenching the Brotherhood - allegations he denies.
 
Egypt has been gripped by political and economic turmoil since army chief General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi overthrew Morsi, the country's first freely elected president, on July 3 after mass protests against his rule.
 
Efforts at reconciliation
 
Friday's violence came a day after European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton held talks in Cairo with top government officials, Sisi, and two Brotherhood politicians and urged both sides to pursue reconciliation.
 
There was no sign either side was prepared to heed her call.
 
Hundreds of people were killed in mid-August when the security forces broke up Brotherhood sit-ins in Cairo. Many of the Brotherhood's top leaders have been arrested since.
 
“They [the government] want a country without religion,” said protester Rasha al-Malky.
 
Sisi has promised that a political road map will lead to elections in the Arab world's most populous nation. The Brotherhood, which says the military staged a coup, has refused to take part in the political transition.
 
Friday's clashes in Cairo broke out as Morsi supporters tried to enter the center of Tahrir Square, the rallying point for hundreds of thousands of protesters during the popular uprising that toppled autocrat Hosni Mubarak in 2011.
 
The protesters chanted slogans calling for the removal of Sisi and waved Egyptian flags.
 
State news agency MENA said the army fired warning shots and tear gas to prevent Brotherhood supporters from crossing a bridge leading into Tahrir Square.
 
Protesters wrote graffiti on the wall of a building near Tahrir reading “Egypt is Islamic.” Others chanted “You coward Sisi” as tear gas billowed in the air.
 
Political tensions have decimated investment and tourism, a pillar of the economy. Attacks by militant groups based in the Sinai Peninsula have risen sharply since Morsi's ouster, with almost daily operations against soldiers and police.
 
Two Egyptian soldiers were killed by masked gunmen in a drive-by shooting on Friday morning on a road near the Suez Canal city of Ismailia, security sources said. The city borders the Sinai.
 
Fears are growing that an Islamist insurgency will take hold beyond the Sinai, which borders Israel and the Gaza Strip. A Sinai-based group claimed responsibility for a failed suicide bombing attack on the interior minister in Cairo last month.
 
On Friday, the Salafi Jihadi militant group warned that any local Bedouin leader who cooperated with the Egyptian authorities would be targeted.

You May Like

Video On the Scene: In Gaza, Darkness Brings Dread and Death

Palestinians fear nighttime raids, many feel abandoned by outside world, VOA's Scott Bobb reports More

African Small Farmers Could Be Key to Ending Food Insecurity

Experts say providing access to microloans, crop insurance, better storage facilities, irrigation, road systems and market information could enable greater production More

University of Michigan Wins Solar Car Race

Squad guided its student-designed solar-powered vehicle to fifth consecutive time victory in eight-day bi-annual American Solar Challenge More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid