News / Middle East

UN Nuclear Inspectors Hope to End Deadlock With Iran

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief nuclear inspector Herman Nackaerts arrives for a meeting about Tehran's disputed nuclear program at the Iranian embassy in Vienna on September 27, 2013.
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief nuclear inspector Herman Nackaerts arrives for a meeting about Tehran's disputed nuclear program at the Iranian embassy in Vienna on September 27, 2013.
TEXT SIZE - +
Reuters
— Iran's apparent new readiness to address international concerns about its atomic ambitions will be tested in talks with U.N. inspectors on Monday, with diplomats hoping for progress such as on access to a sensitive military site.
 
However, the diplomats say Iran will probably agree to cooperate fully with an investigation by the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) only if a broader deal is reached in separate negotiations with six world powers.
 
New President Hassan Rouhani has raised hopes of an end to international deadlock over the nuclear program by promising to engage with the West, in return for an easing of sanctions that are damaging the Iranian economy.
 
The Vienna-based IAEA has been investigating accusations for several years that Iran may have coordinated efforts to process uranium, test explosives and revamp a missile cone in a way suitable for a nuclear warhead.
 
Iran says such claims are baseless and forged, and a series of meetings in Vienna between Tehran officials and the IAEA inspectors since early 2012 have been fruitless.
 
Expectations for Monday's round are higher and the diplomats believe Iran may soon offer some concessions, perhaps by allowing the inspectors to visit its Parchin military base southeast of Tehran - long a priority for the IAEA.
 
“I think both sides are looking to see whether they can be a bit more creative,” one Western envoy said. Another diplomat said Iran would need to come up with “something positive.”
 
The IAEA believes nuclear-related explosives tests took place at Parchin, possibly a decade ago, and wants the inspectors to interview officials and study documents to shed light on what happened there.
 
It has acknowledged, however, that it may no longer unearth anything at Parchin due to suspected Iranian efforts to remove any incriminating nuclear-linked traces there.
 
Tehran denies the accusations and says it will allow visits to Parchin once the two sides have reached an agreement on how the investigation should be carried out.
 
Any overall deal with the IAEA is likely to depend on progress at the separate talks in Geneva between Iran and the six powers - the United States, France, Britain, Germany, China and Russia, which want Tehran to curb nuclear work that can have both civilian and military uses.
 
These negotiations resumed on a hopeful note last week and a further round is due on Nov. 7-8. An Iranian parliamentarian was quoted as saying Iran had halted its higher-grade uranium enrichment, but diplomats in Vienna said they were unaware of any such move. The IAEA declined comment.
 
Eleven unsuccessful meetings
 
The IAEA - tasked with preventing the spread of nuclear weapons in the world - wants access to sites, officials and documents for its stalled investigation into alleged past experiments and research that could help Iran assemble atomic bombs, if it decided to pursue such arms of mass destruction.
 
Eleven meetings between senior IAEA and Iranian officials since January last year have so far failed to produce a framework accord outlining the terms for the investigation.
 
But diplomats briefed on the closed-door discussions said Iran seemed more willing to tackle issues of substance in the last meeting, held in late September.
 
Western experts say Iran must address the IAEA's concerns if it is to build confidence in the outside world that any activity it might have undertaken in the past to acquire a capability to produce nuclear weapons has since ended.
 
“Iran knows that in order to pave a way to a comprehensive solution those questions need to be answered,” said former IAEA chief inspector Olli Heinonen, now at Harvard University's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.
 
Iran says its nuclear program is for peaceful electricity generation and that it will never develop atomic arms.
 
Tehran could make sanctions relief more likely if it would “immediately cooperate with the IAEA on inspections of key sites, including Parchin, and to ensure that past weapons-related experiments have been discontinued”, the Arms Control Association, a U.S. research and advocacy group, said.

You May Like

Multimedia Relatives of South Korean Ferry Victims Fire at Authorities

46 people are confirmed dead, but some 250 remain trapped inside sunken ferry More

War Legacy Haunts Vietnam, US Relations

$84 million project aims to clean up soil contaminated by Agent Orange More

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Saito Yakagima from: Japan
October 25, 2013 5:46 AM
what is so difficult for me to understand is why Israel spearheads the sanctions on Iran...?? Israel is very unlikely to be threatened by a nuclear Iran (we all know that Israel thermo-nuclear arsenal is comparable to that of the former Soviet Union - in numbers, that is; and in sophistication - far more advanced...)
Here is the problem - the real targets of a nuclear Iran are the Golf Arab States and Saudi Arabia - definitely lets say not friends of Israel... so, why is Israel so upset with Iran??? you see - its like Turkey and Syria - Turkey would have been in deadly peril if Syria developed the nuclear bomb not Israel... so why did Israel destroy Syria nuclear bomb...??? Turkey should have been grateful to Israel - yet - Turkey stabbed Israel in the back... by promoting the cause of Hamas, and now accommodating Al Qaida operations in Syria...
can anyone help me understand...??


by: Dr. H M from: Saudi Arabia
October 24, 2013 8:05 PM
what the "west" doesn't understand is that the Islamic Iranian Government is completely decayed... it is rotten to the core... its dying... by their own brutality and injustice and oppression of the proud people of Iran... the revolting Iranian Ayatullahs only hope is to be sustained somehow by "Western" assistance... if the "west" want to be secure they must act to replace the whole Iranian rotten theocracy.

In Response

by: Mitt moran from: USA
October 24, 2013 10:19 PM
as bad as you think Iran is, Saudi Arabian GOV is 100000000 times more brutal. They are Mad Dogs.


by: Dr. Hans from: Germany
October 24, 2013 10:19 AM
yeah sure... you believe that??? you think the Iranian Islamists will find some moldy fatuwa from some rotting Ayatulla giving up nuclear weapons...?? we all know that only a devastating military strike by Israel on the Iranian nuclear facilities will save Europe from itself... also, do not trust Obama.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politicsi
X
Michael Eckels
April 19, 2014
There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Ukraine, Russia, United in Faith, Divided in Politics

There is a strong historical religious connection between Russia and Ukraine. But what role is religion playing in the current conflict? In the run-up to Easter, Michael Eckels in Moscow reports for VOA.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid