News / USA

    US Storm System Kills 19, Tornado Hits Mississippi

    • Raella Faulkner, at left, and Bobby McElroy survey what's left of their home, April 28, 2014, after a tornado struck the town of Vilonia, Arkansas late Sunday.
    • Elquin Gonzalez, owner of the Texaco gas station on North Gloster Street in Tupelo, Mississippi, begins cleaning up his business after a tornado touched down, April 28, 2014.
    • Jimmy Sullinger, sits and watches lightning as a storm approaches the gas station where he works, April 28, 2014, in Berry, Alabama.
    • Deanna Locke, 17, and her siblings including, from left, Charlotte, Drew, and Trinity examine a downed tree across the street from their home in Tupelo, Mississippi, after a suspected tornado moved through town, April 28, 2014.
    • Connie Krehel looks through debris after her home was hit by a tornado, April 28, 2014, in Vilonia, Arkansas.
    • Tornado damage is surveyed in Quapaw, Oklahoma, April 28, 2014.
    • Sherry Lee hugs her brother-in-law Andy Lee, April 28, 2013 after a tornado destroyed her home Sunday on Cemetery Street in Vilonia, Arkansas.
    • Piles of debris is all that's left to homes located off Cemetery Street in Vilonia, Arkansas, after a tornado struck the town, April 28, 2014.
    • A tornado-damaged home awaits cleanup and repairs after a tornado hit the region, Baxter Springs, Kansas, April 28, 2014.
    • An electricity distribution tower was toppled over after a tornado system ripped through several states, near Mayflower, Arkansas, April 28, 2014.
    • A row of lightly damages houses, top, face a row of destroyed homes after a tornado struck the town killing at least 16 people, Vilonia, Arkansas, April 28, 2014.
    • A travel trailer was thrown on its side after a tornado struck, Mayflower, Arkansas, April 28, 2014.
    • Stumps of trees remain after a tornado damaged the tops of them in the town of Mayflower, Arkansas, April 27, 2014.
    • Tornadoes ripped through the south-central United States killing at least 12 people in Arkansas and Oklahoma, leaving a trail of debris, Mayflower, Arkansas, April 27, 2014.
    • A thunderstorm supercell passes over the area with the potential of becoming a tornado, Hampton, Arkansas, April 24, 2014.
    Deadly U.S. Tornadoes

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    Reuters
    On a second day of ferocious storms that have claimed at least 19 lives in the southern United States, a tornado tore through the Mississippi town of Tupelo on Monday causing widespread destruction to homes and businesses, according to witnesses and local emergency officials.

    At least one person was killed in the city of about 35,000 in the northeast of the state and the birthplace of Elvis Presley.

    Most of the deaths from the violent storms occurred on Sunday when tornadoes tossed cars like toys in Arkansas and other states.
     
    Tornadoes in U.S. April 27-28Tornadoes in U.S. April 27-28
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    Tornadoes in U.S. April 27-28
    Tornadoes in U.S. April 27-28
    Monday's twister went through the north and west of Tupelo at about 3 p.m. (1800 GMT), damaging hundreds of homes and businesses, downing power lines and toppling trees, according to the National Weather Service.

    "It was real bad. We're trying to pull people out," Tupelo Police Chief Bart Aguirre, told Reuters, referring to emergency crews going house to house, searching damaged buildings.

    "It's a very serious situation," said Tupelo Mayor Jason Shelton. "I am just encouraging everyone to stay inside and be weather aware. There is still a very real danger of another line coming through and people still need to be inside.

    "Main roads in and out of Tupelo were closed and the city announced a 9 p.m.(0200 GMT) curfew. Some residential areas were closed off as emergency crews checked downed power lines and gas leaks.

    Residents whose homes were destroyed took refuge in a Red Cross shelter at a downtown sports arena.

    "I heard snapping and I said, 'Get down on the floor!' And then the trees started falling over," said Moe Kirk Bristow of Tupelo.

    "Three trees fell on her house, one which flattened my car port and two cars and almost every big tree in her neighborhood was felled," Bristow said.

    "I haven't seen a house yet that doesn't have a tree through it or on it, so it's bad," she added.

    Social security worker Adrian Brim described receiving a text message from her teenage sons who were home with her husband that said, "the house is shaking" as the twister passed.

    "I was just praying God would take care of them," she said.

    The house survived with roof and fence damage, she said.

    Another woman, Reginia DeWalt said she was awakened when the tornado went by. "It sounded like a big pressure washer - but worse," she said.

    Parts of Alabama, western Georgia and Tennessee also were at risk as the storm system that produced the series of tornadoes headed east toward the Mid-Atlantic states. Rescue workers, volunteers and victims have been sifting through the rubble in the hardest-hit state of Arkansas, looking for survivors in central Faulkner County where a tornado reduced homes to splinters, snapped power lines and mangled trees.

    Arkansas Governor Mike Beebe said at least 15 people had died statewide in the storm that authorities said produced the first fatalities of this year's U.S. tornado season. He previously told a news conference 16 had been killed but later said there was a mistake in calculation.

    Nine of the victims on Sunday came from the same street in the town of Vilonia, with a population of about 4,100, where a new intermediate school set to open in August was heavily damaged by a tractor trailer blown into its roof. A steel farm shop anchored to concrete was erased from the landscape.

    Beebe told reporters of the capricious nature of tornadoes. He said a woman died when the door of her home's reinforced safe room collapsed, while a father and three daughters survived by seeking shelter in a bathtub that was flipped over in winds that leveled the house.

    The Arkansas National Guard was deployed to sift through the wreckage. Beebe declared a state of disaster for Faulkner and two other counties.

    One person was killed in neighboring Oklahoma and another in Iowa, state authorities said.

    A tornado in Baxter Springs, Kansas, that touched down on Sunday evening destroyed as many as 70 homes and 25 businesses and injured 34 people of whom nine were hospitalized, state and county officials said. One person was killed in Kansas, likely due to the same storm system, officials said.

    'Long Road to Healing'

    "Everything is just leveled to the ground," Vilonia resident Matt Rothacher said. "It cut a zig-zag right through town."

    Rothacher was at home with his wife and four children when the tornado passed through. While his home survived, The Valley Church where he serves as pastor was flattened.

    Two elementary school-aged boys died in their home after having a pizza dinner at a friend's home, said Rothacher, who was helping provide grief counseling to the family that had sent the two boys home after they finished their meal as the storm approached.

    The home that the boys left survived the tornado. The home the boys returned to did not, Rothacher said.

    "These homes, these lives, won't be put back together anytime soon," he said. "It will be a long road to healing for these families."

    The White House said President Barack Obama, who has been on a trip abroad, called Beebe to receive an update on the damage and to offer his condolences.

    Medical officials reported at least 100 people in Arkansas were injured.

    "It's so heartbreaking. I've never seen destruction like this before," U.S. Representative Tim Griffin told reporters after touring Vilonia, which was previously hit by a tornado about three years ago. "I saw a Dr. Seuss book in the rubble. I saw a Spider-Man shirt in the rubble. It just breaks your heart."

    The roar of heavy equipment filled the air in Vilonia and nearby Mayflower as crews worked to clear debris off the streets or to load rubble onto trucks for removal.

    The National Weather Service said the threat of tornadoes will last for several days as a strong weather system interacts with a large area of unstable air across the central and southern United States.

    North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory declared a state of emergency for four counties where tornadoes hit on Friday and warned that more rough weather was on the way.

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