News / Americas

Venezuela's Maduro Slams US for Threatening Sanctions

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro speaks during a meeting with mayors and governors at Miraflores Palace in Caracas, May 19, 2014.
Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro speaks during a meeting with mayors and governors at Miraflores Palace in Caracas, May 19, 2014.
Reuters
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro hit out at the United States for meddling in the affairs of the OPEC-nation on May 20, accusing the American government of threatening sanctions against Venezuela.
          
Meeting with government ministers in Caracas, Maduro lashed out at Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jacobson and America's right after a recent Senate hearing where government officials debated the imposition of sanctions on Venezuela.
          
“I reject, I hate the interference of these right-wing sectors of the United States in the internal affairs of Bolivar's homeland. What's more detestable is Jacobson's statements,” he said.
          
Last month, Jacobson said sanctions could be an “important tool” to pressure Maduro's government to negotiate with the country's opposition to bring an end to months of violent anti-government protests that have killed over 40 people.
          
Maduro called on Jacobson to stop meddling in Venezuela's internal affairs.
          
“What does Venezuela's dialogue have to do with you Ms. Jacobson? Worry about the many problems in the United States, why are you interfering in Venezuela, what's it to you Ms. Jacobson, to come and comment on the dialogue,” he declared.
          
Amid tense talks with Maduro's government, Venezuela's opposition pulled out of month-long negotiations aimed at putting an end to political unrest and mass anti-government protests, claiming that Socialist Party leaders had undermined the dialogue with constant insults and a refusal to consider amnesty for opposition-linked prisoners.
          
Despite the gulf of differences between both sides of Venezuela's politics, Maduro called on the opposition coalition of the Democratic Unity Roundtable (MUD) to also come out against threats of sanctions by the United States.
          
“I demand the MUD to reject the accusations of the Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jacobson, to reject the threats of sanctions against Venezuela by the External Relations Committee of the United States. I ask this of the MUD on the negotiating table, dialogue with concrete results,” added Maduro.
          
Maduro has accused the opposition of being obstructionist but at the same time has urged them not to walk away from the negotiating table, saying such a disappointing outcome goes against the wishes of millions of Venezuelans and benefits the country's foreign enemies.
          
The MUD is seeking the release of demonstrators arrested during recent protests, as well as participation in the selection of new leaders of Venezuela's electoral council.
          
Since February, in what has been the OPEC member's worst unrest in a decade, at least 42 people have died in violence related to the protests, more than 800 have been injured and about 3,000 arrested, of whom more than 200 remain behind bars.

You May Like

India PM Modi's Party Distances Itself From Religious Conversions

BJP under fire for being slow to rein in hardline affiliate groups allegedly trying to promote Hindu-dominant agenda by luring Muslims and Christians to convert More

Anti-Whaling Group Found in Contempt of Court

Radical environmentalists who threw acid and smoke bombs at Japanese whalers in the waters off Antarctica continue their campaign to disrupt Japan's annual whale hunt More

UN's Ban Urges End to Discrimination Against Ebola Workers

Ban was speaking in Guinea on the second day of a whistle-stop tour aimed at thanking healthcare workers of the countries at the heart of the epidemic More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Michael Lewis from: USA
May 21, 2014 11:30 PM
Venezuela is a country that under Hugo Chavez's government hated USA a lot. Now this people want USA government to punish their current dictator Nicolas Maduro ? Venezuela's politicians like Mr. Henrique Capriles are corrupted. Corruption, crime, abuse to people and animals is rampant there.
US should mind its own business. I'm tired to see US in a world police role. Let Venezuelans resolve their own problems


by: Roberto E Fiad from: Miami, FL
May 21, 2014 11:29 PM
The thesis of this comment, the main fact that Nicolas Maduro refuses to understand or chooses to deliberate misunderstand about the United States right to apply economic sanctions against his regime - is that the U.S. Government is in its right to choose what country the United States will trade with or cease trading with.

If enough voters have elected enough federal legislators in the House of Representatives and in the U.S. Senate, and if enough of those Congressmen and Congresswomen and Senators debate and then vote on the floors to pass a bill that imposes sanctions against the Venezuelan government, then the American people, or enough of them, will have exercised their sovereignty at the loss of the Maduro regime and then that regime will need to rethink and readjust their responses in order to have such sanctions rescinded.


by: Lina from: Miami
May 21, 2014 3:41 AM
is about time that USA do somthing about this.. dictadors oppressed people and they having a good life out of their own countries and they having a bank account and properties in USA and they keep said to their people that americans are bad. we never good for them only good to buy oil.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US Decision on Cuba Underscores Divisions Among Miami Cubansi
X
Sharon Behn
December 19, 2014 9:34 PM
For decades, older, more conservative Cubans have been gathering at Café Versailles on the corner of Calle Ocho to eat Cuban food and talk politics. After hearing of President Barack Obama’s decision, a number of them gathered in front of the café with posters to protest. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on the situation.
Video

Video US Decision on Cuba Underscores Divisions Among Miami Cubans

For decades, older, more conservative Cubans have been gathering at Café Versailles on the corner of Calle Ocho to eat Cuban food and talk politics. After hearing of President Barack Obama’s decision, a number of them gathered in front of the café with posters to protest. VOA's Sharon Behn reports on the situation.
Video

Video Three Cities Bid for Future Obama Presidential Library

President Barack Obama still has two years left in his term in office, but the effort to establish his post-presidential library is already underway. The bid for the Obama Presidential Library is down to four locations in three states -- New York, Hawaii, and Illinois. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, each of them played an important part in the president’s life before he reached the White House.
Video

Video Cuba Deal is Major Victory for Pope’s Diplomatic Initiatives

Pope Francis played a key role in brokering the US-Cuba deal that was made public earlier this week. It is the most stunning success so far in a series of peacemaking efforts by the pontiff. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky has more.
Video

Video Fears of More Political Gridlock in 2015

2014 proved to be a difficult year politically for President Barack Obama and a very good year for the U.S. Republican Party. Republican gains in the November midterm elections gave them control of the Senate and House of Representatives for the next two years -- setting the stage for more confrontation and gridlock in the final two years of the Obama presidency. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone has a preview from Washington.
Video

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

The school dropout rate is at an all-time high in Sudan's South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during the three-year civil war between the government and SPLA-N rebel forces. Adam Bailes visited Sudan's Nuba Mountains' region and reports many children are simply too scared to go to school
Video

Video VOA Reporter Tours Devastated Peshawar School

Islamist militants wearing military uniforms and strapped with explosives attacked a military run school Tuesday in the northwestern Pakistani city of Peshawar. At least 141 people were killed in the horrific attack, most of them young students. VOA reporter Ayaz Gul visited the devastated school and attended the funeral of the principal who courageously tried to save her students from the deadly attack.
Video

Video Nigerians Fleeing Boko Haram Languish in Camp Near Capital

In its five-year effort to impose Islamic law in northeastern Nigeria, the Boko Haram extremist group has killed thousands of people and forced hundreds of thousands to flee. Some of those who ran for their lives now live in squalor on the edges of the capital, Abuja. Chris Stein reports for VOA.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.

All About America

AppleAndroid

More Americas News

Tourism, Farm Groups See Bigger Business With Cuba

'We are the closest major food producer that Cuba has,' an American Farm Bureau Federation spokesman notes
More

Castro Lauds US Outreach, Says Cuba to Remain Communist

In speech to lawmakers, Cuba's president says economic reforms will be accelerated, yet changes will be gradual
More

Raul Castro Steps Out of Brother's Shadow With US Deal

Cuban president scores diplomatic triumph, surge in support with this week's deal that ends decades of hostility with United States
More

US Report: Immigration Officials' Apprehensions Rose in 2014

Apprehensions of Mexicans fall 14 percent; those of individuals from other countries, predominantly in Central America, rise 68 percent
More

Strife, Mutual Interests Mark Cuba-US Ties

Island nation was once a vacation destination for Americans; over years, many Cubans sought refuge across the Florida Straits
More

Video Miami Cubans Divided on New US Policy

While older, more conservative Cuban Americans have promoted anti-Castro political movement for years, younger generations say economically, it is time for change
More