News / Asia

Indian Minister Leads Delhi Rape Protest

Women hold placards as they march during a rally organized by Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit (unseen) protesting for justice and security for women, in New Delhi, January 2, 2013.
Women hold placards as they march during a rally organized by Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit (unseen) protesting for justice and security for women, in New Delhi, January 2, 2013.
New Delhi residents braved wintery weather to march in protest of a gang rape that resulted in the death of a 23-year-old woman last week.

The Wednesday march was called by the city's Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit, who attended with members of her cabinet and continued to draw followers as they wound through the city.

Dikshit -- and the central government -- have themselves been the target of protest over women's safety in the wake of the incident.

  • Lawyers shout slogans as they hold placards and a banner during a protest demanding the judicial system act faster against rape outside a district court in New Delhi, India, January 3, 2013.
  • Indians stand in a line to enter the District Court complex where a new fast-track court was inaugurated Wednesday to deal specifically with crimes against women, in New Delhi, India, January 3, 2013.
  • An elderly Indian man lights a candle at a makeshift memorial of a gang-rape victim in New Delhi, India, Janueary 3, 2013.
  • Women carrying placards enter Raj Ghat to attend a prayer ceremony for a rape victim after a rally organized by Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit (unseen), New Delhi, India, January 2, 2013.
  • A student prays during a vigil for a gang rape victim, who was assaulted in New Delhi, in Ahmedabad, India, December 31, 2012.
  • Students hold candles as they pray during a vigil for a gang rape victim who was assaulted in New Delhi, in Ahmedabad, India, December 31, 2012.
  • Men lie on a street while on a hunger strike during a protest in New Delhi, India, December 31, 2012.
  • Students participate in a protest rally, in Hyderabad, India, December 31, 2012.
  • Indians burn effigies of the rapists during a candle-lit vigil to mourn the death of a gang rape victim in New Delhi, India, December 30, 2012.
  • Indians participate in a candle-lit vigil to mourn the death of a gang rape victim in New Delhi, India, December 30, 2012.

Indians were shocked when news spread of the brutal beating and sexual assault allegedly perpetrated by five men and a teenage boy on December 16.

The unnamed woman died of her injuries on Saturday, sparking further anger amid middle class citizens demanding gender equality.

This protester says women are not safe on the streets of New Delhi and the only way to stop this kind of violence is to punish offenders harshly.

The suspects are currently in custody.

Police announced on Tuesday that they would ask prosecutors to seek the death penalty for her adult attackers.

Experts say India is plagued with violence targeting women, including rape, dowry murders, acid attacks, honor killings and child marriages.

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Comment Sorting
by: Roberta from: NY USA
January 09, 2013 10:41 AM
Thank god I am from America and yes, NYC and crime exists here but unless I'm going into a deserted, bad area I am not afraid to walk home at night or day. I must add, that as a Jewish woman I never had to be afraid of being gang or date raped. If a Jewish boy ever raped a woman the parents note the PARENTS would be so shamed - it is unacceptable in our culture. In general, rape is unheard of in our society. A Jewish mother- MOTHER would kill her own son (not literally) if she learned her son did that to a woman. It starts at home where Indian mothers are mistreated by their in laws and husbands-perhaps not as much in the Brahmins. I do except the Satmar Jews though - they are a different sect than most Jews in America. They do not treat their woman equally. There needs to be campaigns at home and in schools from very young that women are EQUAL and must be treated with respect.

by: Rev Chandananda from: Canada
January 02, 2013 12:26 PM
Is this danger only for women? Men too are in danger. Imagine a boy brought up in Delhi, there is a high chance for him to become a rapist and be killed by somebody in the future!

The mere imposing of severe punishment itself is not enough to bring down sexual crimes but the whole hedonistic life-philosophy which coddles defilement in many ways have to be radically changed. To effect this, we have to redefine the meaning of life, meaning of love, meaning of sex and meaning of suffering.

by: notcorrupt from: australia
January 02, 2013 10:28 AM
How about they also protest against corruption in the police force and the government in general. What isn't reported is how they caught these guys. Apparently every cop in the city (possibly country) is given what is called a "Hafta" Book, which is essentially a book of bribes. Yes they keep a ledger of their bribes (so that superior officers can collect there share as well) the bus where these acts took place was an illegal unchartered unlicensed bus, where the owners essentially paid bribes to the cops so they can operate the unlicensed coach.

Had this rampant corruption not exist that bus would not have been allowed to be on the road, the poor girl would've been on a licensed city bus with a verified driver and this could've been avoided. Protest the Corruption and the Government for rampant disease ridden corruption! My prediction is that this problem will continue and innocent people will be given the blame for crimes that an individual who bribed the cops committed.
In Response

by: pj
January 02, 2013 1:41 PM
I agree and do not agree. Law and corruption may have stopped this incidence, but not many others where women are being assaulted and tortured by their own folks. they don't report as they have no way out. As long as people of this country continue to consider their women inferior by making dowry acceptable, female foeticide, stalking a girl (not legally, but in their mind), some monster would take this sense of entitlement and superiority a step forward and rape and kill someone as Indian's inherently believe that men are superior which leads to the belief that they can do anything.

This is demonstrated in every single aspect of this society- people are sad when a girl is born, girls family pays for the wedding, men walk in shorts in 45 degree but women can't, men are fed first instead of women and children. Its not about law, its about how you raise your men- you treat them like kings and they act like mad monsters. Law can't change this mentality- this has to come from within... This is only country where their goddesses are women, they call their country 'mata' (mother) and take dowry and kill their women. We have to admit that there is something terribly wrong with our mindset and upbringing and hopefully better educated people can set an example.
In Response

by: J Slakker from: California
January 02, 2013 12:35 PM
The corruption made it easier to commit this crime, which is murder. They beat her to death with iron rods. The perpetrators can in no way be excused for the crime they committed.
In Response

by: sher from: toronto
January 02, 2013 11:28 AM
India has a long way to go to boast of their booming economy.
A booming economy brings its on blessings and sadnesses, unfortunately the country looks at its blessings only.
To curve poverty, social injustice, crime cannot be forgotten.
Wake up India.
In Response

by: Nirbijan Nirvichara
January 02, 2013 11:22 AM
That is a weird logic indeed. So the death of the girl is not rapists' fault , but a girl herself and an unlicensed driver/company and corrupt cops ?
In Response

by: Anonymous
January 02, 2013 10:57 AM
I agree
These protest are just eye wash to suppress the public anger. Just look at the small kid leading the protest, does he know what rape is??
In Response

by: rational from: canada
January 02, 2013 10:56 AM
I agree...... These crimes are result of the system failure and not some individuals being criminal. How many MPs and their family members have rape case against them pending in courts? Same about state legislature assemblies. There is NO way India can be cleansed of such criminals except through mass executions of these politico-criminals which of course is never going to happen. People are sheep and they have been treated like that for centuries. Whoever tries to stand up to the tyranny, is labelled anti-national and put down.

Nothing has changed from the time of British masters..actually things have gone worse. Punjab and Bengal were punished by partition for standing up to government's tyranny and same shit is continuing....good luck will be slaughtered --physically, emotionally and every other way. Flimsy e-protests or youth-India awakening are all BS and will fade in a few weeks. Read and learn from your history or else just accept what ever comes your way....

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