News / Middle East

Gunmen Kill 29 in Baghdad Apartment

FILE - Iraqi Shi'ite tribal fighters deploy with their weapons while chanting slogans against the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, in Baghdad's Sadr City, Iraq, June 13, 2014.
FILE - Iraqi Shi'ite tribal fighters deploy with their weapons while chanting slogans against the al-Qaida-inspired Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, in Baghdad's Sadr City, Iraq, June 13, 2014.
VOA News

Gunmen stormed an apartment building in a Baghdad neighborhood Saturday, killing at least 29 people, mostly women.

Iraqi police report finding bodies scattered throughout the building and blood streaming down the stairs.

No one has claimed responsibility for the attack and the motive is also unknown.

Report: Iraqi forces execute 255

Earlier Saturday, Human Rights Watch accused Iraqi security forces and government-backed militias of illegally executing at least 255 prisoners in the last month.

The New York-based rights group said the executions took place in six Iraqi towns and villages since June 9, calling them an "outrageous violation of international law."

The group said most of the victims were Sunni prisoners who were fleeing the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and other armed groups. At least eight of the murdered prisoners were less than 18 years old.

Human Rights Watch gathered statements from witnesses, security forces and government officials for the report.

The accusations come as violence continues to spread across Iraq, which is sending about 4,000 volunteers to the embattled city of Ramadi, west of Baghdad, to support government forces battling Sunni militants.

Kirkuk

People inspect the site of a car bomb attack on cars lined up at a gas station in the oil rich city of Kirkuk, in northern Iraq, July 10, 2014.People inspect the site of a car bomb attack on cars lined up at a gas station in the oil rich city of Kirkuk, in northern Iraq, July 10, 2014.
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People inspect the site of a car bomb attack on cars lined up at a gas station in the oil rich city of Kirkuk, in northern Iraq, July 10, 2014.
People inspect the site of a car bomb attack on cars lined up at a gas station in the oil rich city of Kirkuk, in northern Iraq, July 10, 2014.

On Friday, a car bomb in northern Iraq's Kurdish-controlled city of Kirkuk killed at least 30 people. The dead include civilians and Kurdish soldiers manning a checkpoint.

Earlier, Kurdish forces seized two northern Iraqi oil fields near Kirkuk, saying they want to secure the facilities.

The central government in Baghdad has condemned the seizure and demanded the Kurds immediately withdraw.

Kurdish forces took control of Kirkuk and other northern areas nearly a month ago.

And in a further split between Kurds and the government, Kurdish politicians formally suspended their participation in Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's Cabinet, calling him "hysterical." The prime minister has accused Kurds of harboring Sunni extremists who have taken over much of northern Iraq and threaten Baghdad.

The Kurds have an autonomous zone in northern Iraq, and many have an eye on independence.

Nickolay Mladenov, United Nations special envoy to Iraq, is urging all Iraqi lawmakers to attend Sunday's session of parliament. He says failing to make progress on forming a new government could plunge Iraq into even more chaos.

Volunteers to Ramadi

Iraqi government TV reported that the 4,000 volunteers were being airlifted to Ramadi from the country's mostly Shi'ite regions of Karbala, Baghdad, Najaf and Basrah.

It said Anbar province governor Ahmed Khalaf al-Dulaimi made the announcement in a statement Saturday.

Some information for this report comes from AP, AFP and Reuters.

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Comments
     
by: meanbill from: USA
July 13, 2014 2:01 AM
Muslim leaders choose a (Qadi) Islamic Judge, in towns, villages, and in war, (who's only qualifications need be), they must be free, sane, adult, trustworthy, and a Muslim, and they mete out instant Islamic Justice, and the decisions by the (Qadi) Islamic Judge, is final, and irrevocable..... (and truth be told), there's no place to keep prisoners on the battlefield, or any extra troops to guard them, is there?

Non-Believers and Infidels believe that the punishment meted out by the (Qadi) Islamic Judge, are terrorist acts, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.... but the factual truth is, that it's all legal under Islamic law, when administered by a (Qadi) an Islamic Judge..... Nobody hears Muslims calling the murders, terrorist acts, war crimes, or crimes against humanity, do they?

by: Brian from: California
July 12, 2014 11:48 PM
Refresh my memory. Why did we go there, again? Can we have our trillion dollars back? And when has there been a time in human history that there wasn't tribal, civil and/or religious war in Iraq? Its their national past time. Its ALL they do. And will be doing 100 years from today. And wasn't it Cheyney who said the US would be greeted as liberators?
In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
July 13, 2014 1:38 PM
The US invaded Iraq because in a (history recorded UN transcript, dated February 05, 2003), Colin Powell convinced the UN and the world, (with fabricated evidence, and falsified reports), that Saddam possessed weapons of mass destruction, and was ready to use them on his neighbors.... That's why the US invaded Iraq.... and you can check out (the Colin Powell history recorded UN transcript, dated February 05, 2003) on the web..... REALLY

by: Jamie Cal from: Chicago USA
July 12, 2014 8:02 PM
Iraq is a nation in name only. It's comprised of many and various competing tribes and religious sects that at this time have no desire to
work and live together. The worlds failure to recognize this this in the Genisis of today's conflict.

by: ali baba from: new york
July 12, 2014 4:42 PM
revenge, religion are the main elements of Arab behavior. ISIL is killing people.. they cut their head. and what the response of Shia , they will kill Sunni with the same manner which ISIL did . In Islam consider killing the enemy even those who are prisoners of war .It is war crime but no law is respected . cutting the bodies into pieces is a disgusting act but it is a common practice in middle east. Sunni

by: Not Again from: Canada
July 12, 2014 3:01 PM
Whith such terrible crimes, Iraq has no future; the only way ahead is to separate these criminals. There is no room to compromise by neither Shia nor Sunni. Just like in Syria, the majority of the victims are becoming Sunni and Shia civilians. If they can't live together, is better to separate them, rather than watch them kill one another's unarmed/defenceless civilians/captives, they have a basic lack of humanity.
As usual terrorists have and proliferate a culture of violence and death.. No good whatsoever can come about from their terrible acts.
In Response

by: David from: St Augustine FL
July 13, 2014 2:46 AM
You are right when you say they must be separated. That is going to happen no matter what we do. The Kurds are not going to give up there money producing lands, and the Sunnis cannot move into the Kurds' or Shia's territory. Biden was right to suggest this solution when he was a senator. In retrospect, it seems almost inevitable.
In Response

by: mOHAMMED from: iNDIA
July 12, 2014 4:32 PM
To label islam as shia sunni is wrong..,,
This article is exactly painting a divide policy picture here

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