News / Middle East

Violence Escalates in Cairo

  • Supporters of Egypt's deposed President Mohamed Morsi carry the body of a fellow supporter killed outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • A wounded supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi lies at a private hospital in Cairo, July 8, 2013.
  • Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi attend a protest outside a military building where he is belived to be detained in Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi march to the Republican Guards headquarters where they believe he is being held by the army, Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Muslim Brotherhood leader Asem Abd-ElMaged delivers a speech to supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, Cairo, July 7, 2013.
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi rally in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, July 7, 2013.
  • Thousands poured into Tahrir Square to celebrate what they are calling Egypt's "Second Revolution", the military's ouster of president Mohamed Morsi, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A man in Tahrir Square holds a sticker saying "No To Terrorism" in reference to the Muslim Brotherhood, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • A man in Tahrir Square writes on a poster "History Will Never Forget Obama," July 7, 2013 (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Many of those who rallied in Tahrir Square brought their families and children, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Protests against ousted president Mohamed Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood supporters have generated high sales for all sorts of nationalist souvenirs, from flags to T-shirts, July 7, 2013. (S. Behn/VOA)
  • Members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi clash with anti-Morsi protesters in Alexandria, July 7, 2013.
VOA News
Egyptian Health Ministry officials say 34 people have been killed in violence outside a military building in Cairo where supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsi were protesting his ouster.

Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood blamed the military, saying soldiers fired on the protesters Monday at the Republican Guard headquarters.

The group called for an "uprising" against what it says are those "who want to steal the revolution with tanks."

The military gave a different version of the events, saying Muslim Brotherhood members tried to storm the building, and soldiers opened fire in defense.  They say one soldier was killed.

In response to Monday's violence, the ultra-conservative Salafi Nour Party says it is withdrawing from talks to form a new government.  

VOA correspondent Sharon Behn, who is in Cairo, says it is hard to independently verify what happened Monday, but that the Nour Party withdrawal could further stress tensions among Egyptians.

“What people here are saying is that that could further polarize the society and divide it between what is turning out to be a sort of liberal, secular, pro-army group that wanted the ouster of Mohamed Morsi because he was heading down a path of Islamic rule that they didn’t want, and on the other side we have the more Islamic sector of the population, which thought that Mohamed Morsi was doing the right thing for the country,” she said.

The two sides have staged massive rallies in Cairo and other cities since the military ousted Morsi last Wednesday.  Clashes Friday left at least 36 people dead and more than 1,000 injured nationwide.

Even before the Nour Party pullout, the country's interim leaders struggled to put together a new government acceptable to both backers and opponents of Morsi.

The political standoff continued Sunday between the secular and liberal-dominated transitional government and hardline Islamist lawmakers.  The faceoff erupted Saturday, after interim President Adly Mansour's office - under pressure from Islamists - backtracked on a decision to appoint Nobel laureate and diplomat Mohamed ElBaradei as Egypt’s interim prime minister.

Many Islamists view the secular former chief of the U.N. nuclear agency an unacceptable choice because of his liberal views.

ElBaradei condemned Monday's violence and called for an independent investigation.

The transitional prime minister will have sweeping powers to govern, while the president is expected to be a largely symbolic post.

In Washington, President Barack Obama voiced renewed concern about the political upheaval, while reiterating that the United States is not aligned with and does not support any particular Egyptian political party or group.

The army described Morsi's removal as necessary to enforce the will of millions of people who have repeatedly demanded his resignation.

Watch a related report by VOA's Sharon Behn

Thousands Gather to Celebrate Egypt's 'Second Revolution'i
X
July 07, 2013 11:23 PM
As Egypt's top leadership bickers about who will head the country's interim government, thousands have gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square to celebrate what they are calling the "Second Revolution" - the military's ouster of President Mohamed Morsi last Wednesday. Sharon Behn reports from Cairo that amid the cheering is increasingly strident criticism of the United States and the Islamic Muslim Brotherhood that has rejected the idea of national reconciliation and insisted that Morsi must be reinstated.
 

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by: امل الحياة from: eygpt
July 08, 2013 8:50 AM

There has been climbing the building by the Republican Guard Brotherhood
.............. And space forces registered cameras
This is not a coup by the military
This bias to the will of the Egyptian people
And the Brotherhood are the ones who use violence
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
July 09, 2013 2:19 AM
I agree

by: Dr. Malek Towghi from: USA
July 08, 2013 6:49 AM
Now that the Egyptian army has turned into a killing machine -- massacring its own people -- the US can prove its neutrality or nonalignment ONLY by immediately suspending its too generous aid, $1.5 billion per year, to the Egyptian army. In 1952, we sided (to say the least) with the coup that overthrew Dr. Mosaddeq of Iran's elected government. We know the horrible consequences. For God's sake, let us not repeat the same mistake. By losing a few corrupt & power hungry Egyptian generals we will lose nothing. If we can talk with the Taliban why not with the Egyptian and Iranian Islamists???

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 08, 2013 6:00 AM
The violent Muslim Brotherhood is busy looking for ways to legitimize itself. It goes as far as insinuating things sounding and looking ridiculous, like the military shooting the protesters from behind when everybody knows the military is in front. Even to the daftest of people, this is untrue. Instead the pointer is to the fact that since life means little to the muslim (especially as held by the Muslim Brotherhood), extremist splinter groups can carry out heinous attacks on their own just to spite and smear the military. Now muslim brotherhood constituting about 35% wants the country bow to them against the wish of 65%. That's unjust. The Muslim Brotherhood should rethink its position and give peace a chance for the survival of Egypt; unless their will has been for the disintegration of the country which tries to correct the error engineered by the Muslim Brotherhood.

by: ali baba from: new york
July 08, 2013 5:28 AM
the Muslim brotherhood thugs attacked the army to go the republican guard to liberate moersi . the army do the right thing to defend themselves .

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
July 08, 2013 12:12 AM
I wonder where and by whom Morshi and some leaders of Islam brotherhhod are detained. If they have been detained by the military, I think this change could be called as coup caused by the military.

I suppose a civil war will not begin because military power looks overwhelimg enough to supress both sides to fight. The next question seems shifting to how the next not-provisional president is chosen.

It is reported that the present constitution will be renewed following Morsi's ouster. Why does the constitution need to be renewed everytime when a president chages?

by: nik from: US
July 07, 2013 10:02 PM
Morsi's government is the democratically elected govt. and the army has no right to remove by force. Only political course should have been used, only the next ballot should have decided. Army's use of force to remove a government is illegal no matter how one looks at it.

If all country's follow Egypt's example no country will have a democratically elected government. Neither India with BJP being upset if congress is elected and vice versa nor US with dems. being upset if Republicans win. What happened in Egypt is a joke and a slap in the face of democracy.
In Response

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 08, 2013 6:13 AM
Egypt is rather a democracy work-in-progress. It is yet an unfinished experiment, so it's only wise and good to nip the evil of error in the bud. The people of Egypt (65%), discovered that they started on a wrong footing, and if allowed to assume a stronghold, change will be distant when they need it. Examples are Iran, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan. Error must be corrected for the right democracy to be established. Islam is not friendly with politics, especially democracy, but the Muslim Brotherhood wants it to take center stage in Egypt politics to exclude liberals and other religions. If allowed to take foothold, it will systematically and with impunity wipe out all other groups, being itself a quarry to anything else not islma.
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
July 08, 2013 5:24 AM
you are wrong. at the situation in Egypt, the army do the right action,, the country in verge of collapse because the Muslim brotherhood. .the economy is deteriorating. the violence escalated with the name of Islam .for example 4 Shia has beaten to death. any country consider Islamic agenda is damaged. look what happen in Sudan ,Lebanon ,Afghanistan .the army has to intervene to avoid civil war.

by: ali baba from: new york
July 07, 2013 1:51 PM
it is obvious that Muslim brotherhood will not give up. but American should support the new Gov. because it is the last hope to restore the safety of the country from a mob of fanatic want impose themselves and use violent with the name of god and American supported these Islamic thugs because their phony claim about democracy. meorsi and brotherhood are not for democracy. they want impose Islamic law and restrict the freedom of individual and religion. I do not understand ,why us Gov are not supported the military coup which it was necessary to correct the chaos of Islamic fanatic

by: ghada Michel from: canada
July 07, 2013 1:39 PM
Please share with your friends and let the world know:

To the WORLD,

This is NOT a military coup, but a real revolution in which millions of Egyptians have participated against all odds, and we would not go back to our homes except after Morsi leaves.

We are the Egyptian people claiming back our country and we ask you to be on our side and not the side of a fascistic clan of fundamentalists who believe that the West are nothing but infidels.

We are people who love freedom, who hail from a civilization that believes in diversity of religions and races.

We are Egypt of the 7,000 years telling you: I revolted..

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