News / Middle East

Rival Militias Still Fighting in Libya

Rival Militias Still Fighting; Libyan Elections Anticipatedi
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Carolyn Presutti
June 06, 2012 2:06 PM
Libya’s first election in more than 40 years is scheduled in two weeks. But, some worry that the country's instability may mar the election or dim the hopes from last year’s successful revolution. VOA’s Carolyn Presutti has the story.
Rival Militias Still Fighting; Libyan Elections Anticipated
Libya’s first election in more than 40 years is scheduled in two weeks.  But, some worry that the country's instability may mar the election or dim the hopes from last year’s successful revolution.  

Fadi Tarapolsi was at the White House the night Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s reign came to an end.  “I’m on cloud nine right now, you know,” he said.

Tarapolsi returned to Libya with his ailing father to celebrate his country’s liberty.

“There’s some frustration there and they want to see some movement, but, at the same time, we are basically building everything from scratch," he said. "So it’s very important to do it right the first time.”

In two weeks, Libyans will elect a 200-member assembly to write a constitution and select a cabinet - but the elections may be delayed.  This week, Libyan authorities regained control of the country's main airport after it was briefly seized by militiamen armed with heavy machine guns. 

Last month, several people died during a militia protest outside the prime minister’s office. Several militias refuse to lay down their guns or join Libya's security force.

"A lot of the violence we've seen in the past six months has been the result of pre-existing tensions just boiling over," said Spencer Butts, with the Institute for the Study of War. "It's not necessarily violence that's directed at the authorities. A lot of it is tit-for-tat kidnappings or revenge killings that have spiralled out of control."

“It’s almost at a tipping point now as far as with the small, little factions.  It could develop into something more dangerous,” said Tarapolsi.

Libyan American activist Ismail Suayah just returned from Libya, where he addressed several hundred people in Martyrs Square. He told Libyans to be patient and to support the national army as it establishes security and rebuilds the country.

“Young people are still in the militia?  Yeah, for the lack of other things to do.  The struggle for power? Sure, that’s expected," Suayah stated. "The transitional government is not doing what people want?  Sure, that’s anticipated.  These things are going to take time.”

Suayah says when he visited Libya in years past, he’d see tears of joy, tempered with despair.  Now he sees tears of joy, enhanced with hope, as Libyans await the election.

Four out of five eligible voters in Libya have registered to cast a vote.  It will be the country’s first democratic election after more than 40 years under the rule of Moammar Gadhafi.

Carolyn Presutti

Carolyn Presutti is an Emmy and Silver World Medal award winning television correspondent who works out of VOA’s Washington headquarters.   She has also won numerous Associated Press awards and a Clarion for her coverage of The Syrian Medical Crisis, Haiti, The Boston Marathon Bombing, Presidential Politics, The Southern Economy, and The 9/11 Bombing Anniversary.  In 2013, Carolyn aired exclusive stories on the Asiana plane crash and was named VOA’s chief reporter with Google Glass.

You can follow Carolyn on Twitter at CarolynVOA, on Google Plus and Facebook.

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by: Optimist from: Everywhere
June 06, 2012 4:37 PM
Libyans are marching ahead, advancing toward a democratic state where the future of their nation is shared and guarded by all. This is their first revolution and they are handling it as best as they can, given the previous regime and political culture, there shall be no stone throwing at them. US's revolution took over ten years before it calmed, Russia's revolution went on for many years before it settled, France's revolution was not a one year occurrence.

Recent glitches here and there were expected to take place. There is no country that got its democratic institutions immediately after claiming their freedom? Libyans have several years and several elections before they filter out which politician belongs in parliament and what party should govern them. No one has the right to criticize them, if anything they are doing it faster than many of us anticipated they would. They need to be commended that they are doing everything without the guidance of any institution.


by: Truth Seeker from: USA
June 06, 2012 10:29 AM
Has anyone ever stopped to ask how this supposed "Arab Spring" sprouted in the hearts of Arabs. None of the fruit appears worth harvesting. The Plot to Overthrow explains so much that it will stagger your world political thinking forever. Mohammad Goldstein bluntly tells the world who is a Jew and what a Muslim really is. Obama has a copy you can get it for nuttin on the net. This guy is red hot and tells more truth than most can digest. The arab spring comes from wormwood and is not a people movement.

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