Romney Vows to Restore 'Promise of America'

    Mitt Romney acknowledges delegates before speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012.
    Mitt Romney acknowledges delegates before speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012.
    TAMPA, Florida — Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney took center-stage at his party's national convention Thursday, promising to restore what he called “the promise of America” if elected in November. Romney made his case to be the next president before thousands inside the convention hall and millions more watching on television around the country.

    View Romney's speech

    It was the biggest moment so far in Mitt Romney's quest for the White House, and he moved quickly to offer a harsh critique of the man he would like to replace, President Barack Obama.

    “America's been patient.  Americans have supported this president in good faith.  But today the time has come to turn the page.  Today the time has come for us to put the disappointments of the last four years behind us,” Romney said.


    Romney said if elected he would focus on growing the economy, pledging to create 12 million new jobs and to make the United States energy-independent by 2020.

    He also vowed to forge new trade agreements and warned that nations that cheat would face what he called “unmistakable consequences.”

    Though much of his acceptance speech dealt with the economy,  Mr. Romney did promise a different approach to U.S. foreign policy that would include strengthening ties with Israel and taking a tougher approach to relations with Russia, China and Iran.

    “Every American was relieved the day President Obama gave the order, and Seal Team Six took out Osama bin Laden.  But on another front, every American is less secure today because he has failed to slow Iran's nuclear threat,” Romney said.

    Romney concluded his address with an emotional pledge to build a better future that brought the Republican convention delegates to their feet. "That future is out there.  It is waiting for us.  Our children deserve it.  Our nation depends on it.  The peace and freedom of the world require it and with your help we will deliver it. Let us being that future for America tonight!,” Romnay said.

    Romney was introduced by a rising star within the Republican Party, Florida Senator Marco Rubio.  Rubio is of Cuban-American descent and is seen by some as a future presidential contender.

    “Our problem with President Obama isn't that he's a bad person, OK?  By all accounts, he too is a good husband and a good father and, thanks to a lot of practice, a good golfer.  Our problem is not that he is a bad person.  Our problem is he's a bad president,” Rubio said.

    Although this convention week in Tampa largely belonged to the Republicans, Democratic Party officials were on hand with a critique of the Republican nominee and his vice presidential running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan.

    Democratic Party Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz spoke to  reporters near the convention site.

    "No, we're not focused or worried about what the Republicans are doing here.  We're certainly going to continue to make sure that the lies that the Republicans have told here, you know, the convention reinvention that Mitt Romney has attempted, which I don't think will ultimately be successful,” she said.

    Romney hopes his convention will give him a boost as he heads into the final stretch of the campaign against President Obama.

    Mark Shields, an analyst for the NewsHour program on the Public Broadcasting System, says the presidential race is likely to remain close right into November because of the weak U.S. economy.

    "You know I think the very fact that Mitt Romney, a flawed candidate, who is not emotionally engaged with the electorate up to this point, is basically running even with the president, who is far better liked, who is regarded as somebody who cares more about average people.  I think it's an indication that the dissatisfaction is a very salient and very persuasive factor,” Shields said.

    The political spotlight now shifts to President Obama and the Democrats, who hold their convention next week in Charlotte, North Carolina.

    • Mitt Romney, vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan (R) and Campaign Manager Matt Rhoades pose for a staff portrait on the steps of the stage at the Republican National Conventionm in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012.
    • Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan wave to delegates after speaking at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida, August 30, 2012.
    • Mitt Romney hugs his grandchildren after his speech, August 30, 2012.
    • Actor Clint Eastwood speaks to an empty chair on the final night of the convention, August 30, 2012.
    • The Republican National Convention main stage at the Tampa Bay Times Forum in Tampa, Florida. (B. Allen/VOA)
    • The Texas delegation reacts to speeches at the convention. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice addresses the crowd, August 29, 2012. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Ann Romney hugs her husband after she addressed delegates during the second session of the Republican National Convention, August 28, 2012.
    • Montana delegates on the floor of the convention. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Dona Poelman from Racine, Wisconsin accessorizes her shirt at the RNC.
    • Delegates cheer as an image of Mitt Romney is displayed during the opening session, August 27, 2012.
    • Texas delegate Clint Moore and the rest of Texas delegates fashion their cowboy hats on the floor.
    • Men prepare food in a protest camp called "Romneyville" outside the convention center.
    • Delegates on the floor watch speakers during the second session. (J. Featherly/VOA)
    • Delegate Sol Grosskopf from Shawano, Wisconisin wears cheesehead hat on the convention floor.
    • Convention goers pause in the prayer room.
    • A sudden, heavy rainstorm surprises protesters outside near the convention center.
    • A worker walks down the aisle to collect trash on the floor at the convention.

    Jim Malone

    Jim Malone has served as VOA’s National correspondent covering U.S. elections and politics since 1995. Prior to that he was a VOA congressional correspondent and served as VOA’s East Africa Correspondent from 1986 to 1990. Jim began his VOA career with the English to Africa Service in 1983.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    August 31, 2012 1:13 PM
    Talking tough, yeah! We're liking it a lot out here. Very important to us is that once again America - USA - will bounce back to glory; terrorists will have to look for a hiding place; and the Middle East problem is going to be settled wherein lies the larger world peace or its absence. The insinuation that Romney is less liked is a fallacy believed by Mark Shield alone. We want USA back to America and the time is now, no more experimenting with speech makers who talk with no action. USA must control world trade and business because of its openness to the world; and all this can only take effect when God's favor is upon the country. God bless America.

    by: Feroen Yihuda from: Africa
    August 31, 2012 8:48 AM
    I am sorry to study that some Americans are much stupider than other people in the world.
    It is a great shame to find one supporting Romney, a tyrant who verbally terrorizes China for its own growth, Iran for having nuclear which Israel and other supporters of America are appreciated for having. He also denies the Palestenians to have no land in this planet. Romney can you help the Palestenian people to get their home sin Mars? Pls, you dull try it in a human way!

    by: Jean Kapenda from: USA/DRC
    August 31, 2012 12:31 AM
    Electrifying, inspiring, and inspired speech tonight. Watch out dictators and tyrants around the world: your end is nearer than you've ever thought! Delighted to watch the next US President, Mitt Romney!

    by: Quach Tỉnh from: Viet Nam
    August 30, 2012 9:51 PM
    I support Obama

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