News / USA

One Year Later, Boston Marathon Makes Comeback Run

Meb Keflezighi of the United States celebrates after winning the 2014 Boston Marathon, April 21, 2014. (Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports)
Meb Keflezighi of the United States celebrates after winning the 2014 Boston Marathon, April 21, 2014. (Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports)
Victor Beattie
Some 36,000 runners from 96 countries took part Monday in the 118th Boston Marathon. Security was tight at the event, following last year’s bombings near the finish line that killed three and wounded more than 260.

An estimated one million people were expected to line the 42.2-kilometer route, from the town of Hopkinton east to Boston’s Boylston Street.

Meb Keflezighi crossed the finish line first, becoming the first American man to win the Boston Marathon in three decades. Keflezighi was born in Eritrea but is now a U.S. citizen.

He wore the names of the bombing victims on his race bib and said last year's attack made him extra motivated to win this year.

"It was not just about me," said the San Diego resident. "I was going to give everything I could for the people."

On the women's side, Rita Jeptoo of Kenya successfully defended the Boston Marathon title she won a year ago but said she couldn't enjoy at the time because of the fatal bombings. Race organizers allowed about 9,000 more runners this year, including roughly 5,000 athletes who were not able to finish last year when twin pressure-cooker bombs went off near the finish line.
Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said heightened security at the event included more uniformed and plainclothes police scattered throughout the race’s route, as well as a ban on backpacks and large containers near the finish line. Appearing on the CBS program "Face the Nation" a day before the race, Patrick talked about how safe he expected the race to be.
  • Meb Keflezighi of the U.S. reacts as he wins the men's division at the 118th running of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Meb Keflezighi of the U.S. (right) is congratulated after winning the men's division of the 118th running of the Boston Marathon.  Keflezighi is the first U.S. male athlete to win the Boston Marathon in three decades, Boston, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Runners in the first wave of 9,000 cross the start line of the 118th Boston Marathon, in Hopkinton, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • A State Police Special Response team patrols past posters of encouragement at Wellesley College before the start of the 118th Boston Marathon, Wellesley, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Workers move security gates into position in front of Wellesley College in the early morning before the start of the 118th Boston Marathon, in Wellesley, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Participants in the wheelchair division of the 118th Boston Marathon start their race, in Hopkinton, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • The second wave of runners make their way down Main Street during the 118th running of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Boston police officers, part of the K-9 unit, patrol Boylston Street near the finish line before the start of the 2014 Boston Marathon, Boston, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Till T. Teuber of Hamburg, Germany, prepares himself before the 118th Boston Marathon, in Boston, Mass, April 21, 2014.
  • Spectators crowd along the Boston Marathon race route to cheer on the runners, April 21, 2014. (Carolyn Presutti/VOA)
  • Elite men runners leave the start line in the 118th running of the Boston Marathon, in Hopkinton, Mass., April 21, 2014.
  • Andrew Lembcke (left), Brandon Petrich (middle) and Bill Januszewski hang a Boston Strong banner before the start of the 2014 Boston Marathon, Boston, April 21, 2014. (Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY)

"We’ve tried to strike a balance between enhanced security and preserving the family feel of this day. One commentator, a friend of ours Mike Barnicle, described the marathon as a 26.2-mile long block party, and there are no strangers here. So, we want to maintain that spirit, but also have considerably more rigor because of the attention the marathon got last year, and the tragedy that ensued, and the demands that we think are quite reasonable for enhanced preparation for this year," said Patrick.
2014 Boston Marathon

  • 36,000 official entrants
  • 10,000 volunteers
  • 3,500 security personnel
  • 1,900 medical personnel
  • Generates an estimated $142 million for local economy


Patrick said there were no known pre-race threats that would cause concern. Last Tuesday, following a memorial service marking the one-year anniversary of last year’s marathon tragedy, police arrested a man with a backpack near the finish line. It contained a rice cooker and was deemed safe.

On April 15, 2013, two explosive devices allegedly hidden in backpacks by two brothers of Chechen descent, 26-year Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his 20-year old brother, Dzhokhar, detonated, sending metal fragments through a crowd of bystanders near the finish line on Boylston Street. Several people lost limbs. 
The blasts set off a multi-day manhunt that ended with Tamerlan Tsarnaev dead from a shootout with police and Dzhokhar being arrested in a Boston suburb. He is due to go on trial in November on 30 federal charges and could face the death penalty. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.
Sites of 2013 Boston Marathon bombingsSites of 2013 Boston Marathon bombings
Scott Kennedy, one of the marathon runners, felt participating in this year’s marathon would send a message.
"Just to show the terrorists that they can’t win. I saw a picture a few weeks ago that said ‘We need to take our finish line back,’ and that’s what I think that 36,000 people are going to do tomorrow, is take the finish line back," said Kennedy.

Watch Carolyn Persuitti's related video:
Boston Marathon Bittersweet for Many Runnersi
April 22, 2014 12:03 PM
Monday's running of the Boston Marathon was bittersweet for many of the 36,000 participants as they finished the run that was interrupted by a double bombing last year. Many gathered along the route paid respect to the four people killed as a result of two bombings near the finish line. VOA's Carolyn Presutti returned to Boston this year to follow two runners, forever changed because of the crimes.

Canadian runner Mark Rush said the bad guys were not going to take this race away, while British runner Mark Hazelhurst said everyone was aware of what happened last year and people wanted to turn out to run, to celebrate running and celebrate the city of Boston.
Another runner, Lukman Faily, the Iraqi ambassador to Washington, said he was taking part to show solidarity with Americans.

Reuters contributed to this report.

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Comment Sorting
by: david1221
April 22, 2014 10:13 AM
In my opinion all these security costs marathons unjustified, but also the most perfect system sometimes faltering. It is best to address the root of the problem, we need to understand why people are satisfied with the terrorist attacks and pay attention to this.

by: meanbill from: USA
April 21, 2014 10:38 AM
FALSE BRAVADO? -- Millions of dollars spent, and over a thousand extra security personal, and hundreds of cameras and monitors, just to run a race?
(IT makes you think?) -- "Just to show the terrorists they can't win" -- Are all these security measures taken because of fear, or are all these security measures taken, to show our bravery to run a race? -- (false bravado, or bravery?).

by: Mrs. Lohan from: Merrick, NY
April 21, 2014 10:35 AM
Why is there no mention of the Tsarnaev brothers being on the CIA payroll months before the so-called "bombing" happened, in this article, VOA?

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