News / Europe

Russia Prepares Law to Ban ‘Gay Propaganda’

Russia Prepares National Law to Ban 'Gay Propaganda'i
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May 06, 2013 7:41 PM
Last month, France became the ninth country in Europe to legalize gay marriage. But in Russia, opposition and intolerance are the trend. James Brooke reports from Moscow.
Russia Prepares National Law to Ban 'Gay Propaganda'
James Brooke
When a gay group held a film festival in Moscow in April, there were the usual anti-gay protesters. But this time, there was an unexpected visitor: a policeman armed with a Kalashnikov, checking ID’s.
 
Later this month, Russia’s Duma is expected to give final approval to a vaguely worded bill that would ban "homosexual propaganda" accessible to minors. 
 
Despite protests, the bill won nearly unanimous approval in a preliminary vote last January.
 
Last month, France became the ninth country in Europe to legalize gay marriage. But in Russia, the trend is going in the opposition direction, away from tolerance.
 
Manny de Guerre, a long-term British resident of Russia, helped organize “Side by Side,” the gay film festival in Moscow.
 
“The impact of the law is that it creates fear in society,” said de Guerre who attended the festival with her partner. “It gives the green light to Orthodox activists, to nationalists, that it’s OK to beat up lesbian and gay people, that it’s OK to discriminate against them.”
 
Putin defiant
 
With Russia increasingly standing out in isolation to the liberal trends of Western Europe, Russian President Vladimir Putin faced gay protesters when he visited Holland last month.
 
Back in Moscow, Putin was defiant when asked about European criticism.
 
"How can they demand that we introduce their standards?” he demanded in a nationally televised call in show. “Or maybe we should demand that they instill our standards in that country? Let's not demand anything from each other. Let's treat each other with respect."
 
Putin’s conservatism is backed by a nationwide Levada poll conducted in February. Two-thirds of respondents backed laws banning "gay propaganda."  And large majorities said that gay propaganda could mean banning books, films, protests and parades.
 
Vladimir Ryzhkov, an opposition politician, says Putin is in step with Russian public opinion.
 
“It’s not like everyone wants a gay parade and Putin is against it,” said Ryzhkov, co-founder of the liberal Republic Party of Russia.  “In this case, his point of view is exactly the same as 90 percent of the population.” 
 
'Family values'
 
At the offices of Young Guard, a Kremlin support group, Ekaterina Stenyakina, gives voice to mainstream Russians' distaste for homosexuality.
 
“We have traditional religions in which family values are among the most important of all,” said Stenyakina, a leader of the group. “That’s why our country, our state, is not ready for this kind of manifestation - gay parades on main squares.”
 
Oleg Grannikov, a Moscow gay activist, says that in this environment most Russian gays keep their personal lives in the shadows.
 
“In Moscow, of course, the situation is better than in the regions,” he said during a break at the film festival. “But still, while people may be open with their friends, very few are open with their parents or at their job.”
 
And Russia’s new legislation seems designed to keep Russian gays firmly in the closet for years to come.

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by: Jim Brooke from: Moscow
May 08, 2013 7:23 AM
LGBT Film Festival Faces Prosecution under 'Foreign Agent' Law
15:09 08/05/2013

MOSCOW, May 8 (RIA Novosti) - St. Petersburg prosecutors have notified an international LGBT film festival, Side by Side, that they are violating Russia's law on “foreign agents,” the event’s organizers said on Wednesday.

Russia passed a law last November requiring all NGOs engaged in political activity, and receiving finance from abroad, to register as a "foreign agent." Critics say the term has overtones of spying and treason to many Russians, an allegation rejected by the law's author, United Russia lawmaker Alexander Sidyakin.

“On 6th May, 2013, the Side by Side LGBT Film Festival, received a ruling from the local prosecutor accusing the organization of violating Article 19.7 of the administrative code relating to the conduct of non-commercial organizations and their status as ‘foreign agents’,” reads an English-language statement posted on the festival’s website.

It says the Side by Side LGBT Film Festival offices were visited by inspectors from various Russian institutions, including the Ministry of Justice, tax service and police in recent weeks. The inspections were carried out as part of nationwide checks into various NGOs.

After the checks, the prosecutors decided that the organization had violated the law on two occasions: by publishing a brochure “The Worldwide LGBT Movement: Local Practices to Global Politics” and by taking part in a social awareness campaign against the recently adopted bill banning “gay propaganda” among minors.

Festival organizer Gulya Sultanova said the prosecutors’ notification was compiled with numerous irregularities.

“Clearly, the document was put together quickly and carelessly and there are glaring errors in regards to dates mentioned - this is a very important moment. They are focusing on content and citing activities that were made prior to 21 November, 2012 when the law concerning ‘foreign agents’ actually came into force,” the statement quotes the organizer as saying.

A magistrates’ court is to hear the case in late May.

by: Steven from: Leong
May 06, 2013 12:34 PM
I used to think that Russia was advanced in education, technology, and scientific study. How did they transform into a religious dictated nation.

So, who created Gays? GOD. What does this TRUTH do to those in Russia, who condemn, discriminate, and crucify their own Gay children? It's in God's hands - what one sows, so shall they reap.

The choice is out there. Many countries have established equality among Gay and straight citizens. They have then, moved on to find solutions to important issues, like poverty, jobless and homeless.

Russia is stuck in pride and fear, fighting their Gay offspring. I will pray for their enlightenment.
In Response

by: freddy from: charlotte
May 30, 2013 2:42 PM
Welp, if USA powers lowered the chlorine et al in the drinking water then reproduction would go up.

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