News / Europe

Russia Retaliates Over Sanctions - from Space

FILE - The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is shown docked at the International Space Station.
FILE - The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft is shown docked at the International Space Station.
VOA News
Russia says it will withdraw support for the International Space Station by the end of the decade, in response to U.S. sanctions imposed on Moscow for annexing Ukraine's Crimean peninsula.

Deputy Prime Minister Dmitri Rogozin announced the move Tuesday, saying the Kremlin will also bar the United States from operating GPS satellite navigation system sites in Russian territories beginning in June. Additionally, Rogozin said Moscow will bar Washington from using Russian-made rocket engines to launch military satellites.

The latest Russian sanctions come as the United States moves forward with plans to deny export licenses for high-technology items that could aid Russia's military.

In rejecting a U.S. request to prolong use of the space station to 2024, Rogozin called Washington "an unreliable partner...which politicizes everything."

Russian Soyuz spacecraft have carried all astronauts to and from the space station since 2011, when the United States ended its space shuttle project.

Moscow on Tuesday also repeated demands to the Kyiv government for a June 2 pre-payment of nearly $1.7 billion, for next month's natural gas shipment to Ukraine. The pre-payment demand was first announced last week, when Moscow said energy-dependent Ukraine missed a May 7 deadline to pay down its $3.5 billion energy debt.

In Brussels Tuesday, interim Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk said his government is "ready for a market-based approach" to gas pricing; but, he demanded that Moscow stop using gas as "a new type of Russian weapon."

It remains unclear what impact the pre-payment demand will have on the 28-nation European Union. Russia supplies about 30 percent of western Europe's natural gas needs, with about half of those supplies passing through Ukraine.

The United States and its European allies have imposed visa bans, asset freezes and other penalties on a long list of Russian corporate leaders and advisers close to President Vladimir Putin, since Moscow voted to annex the Crimean peninsula in March.

Some information for this report comes from AP, AFP and Reuters.

You May Like

Lebanese Media Unite to Support Palestinians in Gaza

Joint newscast billed as Arab world’s first unified news bulletin in support of Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip More

Photogallery Australian PM Alleges ‘Coverup’ at MH17 Crash Site

Meanwhile, Russia's ambassador to Malaysia denies plane's black boxes were opened before they were handed over to Malaysian officials More

Despite Advances in AIDS Treatment, Stigma Lingers

Leading immunologist tells VOA that stigma is often what prevents those infected with disease from seeking treatment More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
May 13, 2014 10:04 PM
I don't think the "sanctions" from the Space should be viewed seriously by current White House Administration. Every speech about Russia Mr. Obama have been starting off with his mantra about Russia as a third rate country, a regional insignificant power and so on. So, the USA that has become great under Mr. Obama will just ignore 'the sanctions' and proceed further in his rhetoric and deeds. The USA sanctions that have been already been imposed on "third rate Russia" served as a wake-up call for the "Russian Bear" after prolonged slumber. The USA under Mr. Obama has become a safe heaven for abducting Russian children as in the last example with a mother in her fourth marriage to an American national. Her name is Orlova Elena Evgenyevna, born October 1969, third time divorced three years ago. With her two Russian born children Orlov Artemy Ilyich, born June 30, 1997 and daughter Orlova Veronica Ilyinichna, born December 25, 2006 she feels safe hidden in the USA.


by: Dell Stator from: US
May 13, 2014 8:41 PM
Agreed, US space policy to save a few bucks and improve US Russia relations by outsourcing to Russia was, no other word, idiotic. A scheme invented by the State Dept head in the sand types and penny wise pound short Bean Counters. Where was our leadership while this was going on, trying to score brownie points arguing over the latest budget deadlock, again, and ...... instead of paying attention to US NATIONAL INTERESTS. Double NASA's budget Tomorrow and reinstate the entire manned space mission - if need be dust off Apollo to get men up until private companies come on line, and help them by offering billion dollar prize to first one to do it by say, 2020


by: AmericanHorseman from: America
May 13, 2014 8:27 PM
Thanks to Obama. I wonder if the rest of the World knows how much Obama is hated here in America. My guess is that they have no idea.


by: Not Again from: Canada
May 13, 2014 5:36 PM
One of the biggests scientific space development failures of the Obama administration = not to ensure that a replacement space vehicle engine/launcher were fully operational; same applies to the space shuttle they should not have been scrapped. This is what occurrs when people do not carry detailed and factual risk analysis, or just ignore it.
Critical strategic programs should never be sold out, just to save a few dollars. Thousands of great US workers, that had earned huge accolades over the decades of space exploration, were put out of work/thrown under the bus, based on some very faulty advice, at best, and at worst not listening to those that are experts in the field; a sorting way/decision making way we observe on some other strategic failure issues, this one goes clearly on shoulders of the current administration; at least one full heavy launch system facility and at least two space shuttle system, for contingencies, should have been left fully operational, until replaced, and the large rocket engine and launch vehicles also should have continued production until totally US built replacements were fully operational. The entire ISS/satellite program is at full risk. These situations were fully predictable, with just a bit of common sense, and a brief review of history. VERY SAD OUTCOME!

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Formi
X
July 22, 2014 10:26 AM
Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.
Video

Video IAEA: Iran Turns its Enriched Uranium Into Less Harmful Form

Iran has converted its stockpiles of enriched uranium into a less dangerous form that is more difficult to use for nuclear weapons, according to the United Nations’ Atomic Energy Agency. The move complies with an interim deal reached with Western powers on Iran's nuclear program last year, in exchange for easing of sanctions. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.
Video

Video Relic of Saint Draws Catholics Worried About Immigration Issue

A Roman Catholic saint who is a figure of devotion for those crossing the border into the United States is attracting believers concerned about the plight of undocumented immigrants. Mike O'Sullivan reports from Los Angeles, where a relic of Saint Toribio has drawn thousands to local churches.
Video

Video Ukraine Rebels Surrender MH17 Black Boxes

After days of negotiations, a senior separatist leader handed over two black boxes from an airliner downed over eastern Ukraine to Malaysian experts early Tuesday. While on Monday, the U.N. Security Council unanimously demanded that armed groups controlling the crash site allow safe and unrestricted access to the wreckage.
Video

Video In Cambodia, HIV Diagnosis Brings Deadly Shame

Although HIV/AIDS is now a treatable condition, a positive diagnosis is still a life altering experience. In Cambodia, people living with HIV are often disowned by friends, family and the community. This humiliation can be unbearable. We bring you one Cambodian woman’s struggle to overcome a life tragedy and her own HIV positive diagnosis.
Video

Video Nature of Space Exploration Enters New Age

Forty-five years ago this month, the first humans walked on the moon. It was during an era of the space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. World politics have changed since then and -- as Elizabeth Lee reports -- so has the nature of space exploration.
Video

Video Chicago’s Argonne Lab Developing Battery of the Future

In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science awarded a $120 million grant to a new technology center focused on battery development - headquartered at Argonne National Laboratory in suburban Chicago, Illinois. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, there scientists are making the next technological breakthroughs in energy storage.
Video

Video In NW Pakistan, Army Offensive Causes Massive Number of Displaced

Pakistan’s army offensive in North Waziristan has resulted in the large-scale displacement of the local population. VOA's Ayaz Gul reports from northwest Pakistan where authorities say around 80 percent of the estimated 1 million internally displaced persons [IDPs] have settled in Bannu district, while much of the remaining 20 percent are scattered in nearby cities.
Video

Video Kurdish Peshmerga Force Secures Kirkuk, Its Oil

The Kurdistan regional government has sent its Peshmerga troops into the adjacent province of Kirkuk to drive out insurgents, and to secure the area's rich oil fields. By doing this, the regional government has added a fourth province to the three it officially controls. The oil also provides revenue that could make an independent Kurdistan economically strong. VOA’s Jeffrey Young went out with the Peshmerga and filed this report.
Video

Video Malaysia Reeling: Second Air Disaster in Four Months

Malaysia is reeling from the second air disaster in four months involving the country’s flag carrier. Flight 340 vanished in March and despite an extensive search, no debris has been found. And on Thursday, Flight 17, likely hit by a surface-to-air missile, came apart over eastern Ukraine. The two incidents together have left more than 500 people dead. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Kuala Lumpur.

AppleAndroid