News / Europe

    Russia's Putin Intends to Sign Adoption Ban

    Opposition activists hold posters reading "Do not involve children in politics" and "Lawmakers, children are not your  ownership" during a protest against a bill banning U.S. adoptions of Russian children in St. Petersburg, Russia,  December 26, 2012.
    Opposition activists hold posters reading "Do not involve children in politics" and "Lawmakers, children are not your ownership" during a protest against a bill banning U.S. adoptions of Russian children in St. Petersburg, Russia, December 26, 2012.
    VOA News
    Russian President Vladimir Putin says he intends to sign a bill that bans Americans from adopting Russian children -- legislation that the U.S. calls "misguided."

    In a televised meeting Thursday, Putin said he still does not see any reason why he should not sign the bill and he intends to sign it.

    The Russian parliament gave final approval to the legislation Wednesday.  All that is needed is Putin's signature for it to become law.

    The measure, named after a Russian toddler who died after his American father left him locked in a car for hours, is Russia's retaliation against U.S. passage of the Magnitsky Act.

    The Magnitsky Act, which was signed by U.S. President Barack Obama this month, imposes a visa ban and financial sanctions on Russian officials accused of human rights violations.  It is named after Sergei Magnitsky, a Russian anti-corruption lawyer who died in jail in 2009, after alleging officials were involved in a multi-million-dollar tax scam.

    In renewed criticism of the adoption bill, the State Department says the "welfare of children is simply too important to tie to the political aspects" of U.S.-Russian relations and it is "misguided to link the fate of children to unrelated political considerations."

    The head of a Russian child advocacy group says he would tell President Putin to "veto" what he calls a "terrible" measure.

    Right of the Child director Boris Altshuler told VOA Thursday that  Putin should advise parliament to seek another response to the Magnitsky Act, one that would not negatively affect children.

    He said many Russian children who are eligible for adoption are languishing in overcrowded orphanages.

    "In Russia, we have 100, 200, 400 kids [grouped together in orphanages]. It is so harmful for the development of the child," said Altshuler.

    During a Thursday briefing in Moscow, Foreign Ministry spokesman Alexander Lukashevich said parliament had "responded appropriately" in passing the ban.  He said the attitude of Russian society had been "reflected."

    The State Department says more than 60,000 Russian children have been adopted by Americans since 1992.

    President Putin has called the adoption ban an adequate response to the Magnitsky Act.  He said Americans have not been taking care of the Russian children they adopt.

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    by: Anonymous
    December 30, 2012 11:37 AM
    I can see Russia ended up just like Syria in the very near future. Nobody in the world actually likes Putin, nobody in Russia. I know many many Russians all of which hate Vladimir Putin with a passion. They say he is very nazi like, and wants to take the freedoms from the people at all costs. If anyone wants to stand up for their rights in Russia they get slapped with a $9,000 ticket. Tell me that isn't nazism at its best. I hope the people of Russia stand up for their rights even stronger against this Putin criminal. Putin should be behind bars for war crimes in Chechnya, why is he a free man and not thrown in jail and throw away the key?

    by: Anonymous
    December 29, 2012 7:28 PM
    So let me get this right... Putin wants to interrupt the processes of children finding good homes because the Americans have a good valid concern and law about human rights. This almost seems like pulling hair or biting back by Putin. But meenwhile its going to slap Putin in the face even harder in the long run very cowardly decision. Lately Putin has been making dumb moves in society. We all know Putin does not truly represent the hearts, minds, or souls, or interests of the Russian people.

    by: Michael from: Russia
    December 28, 2012 6:27 AM
    I'm absolutely agree with Mr. Putin that we should take care about our orphans by ourselves. More than that, I'm agree that USA must be punished for that they break main international laws by not letting the foreign observers in court after the accidents with children. Russia has all opportunities to take care of the orphans now, we have a lot of national programs those make the population grow again. At the same time Putin signs the document for giving the bonuses to Russian families for adoption the children from their own country.

    by: JohnWV from: USA
    December 28, 2012 6:19 AM
    Congress barring entry to America of foreign officials who have committed human rights violations is understandable. But whyever did Congress choose Russians who only may have done so? Better Congress bar all Israelis who routinely and overtly savage Palestinians and formally discriminate against goyim. Is our thriving Military Industrial Complex seeking restoration of a truly viable enemy?

    by: mml from: nj
    December 27, 2012 4:16 PM
    Have you people lost your mind??
    Get more hate out and let some thought get in. Idiots.

    by: curt from: losangeles
    December 27, 2012 3:28 PM
    i personally dont understand why everybody is upset over this we dont live in russia and dont have a say in the way the govertment is run and iam sure the same applies to them i look at it in a different aspect first we have loveable kids here in the united states thats dying to be adopted kids thats need a home and love so why do u want to go thousand of miles away for a child if the laws are too strict then we need to make it more lenient we americans need to start lookin at home first sure they are cute and loveable but arent all kids and lets put this behind us theres nothing we can do about it and wajke up and start adopting our own less fortunate kids and leave other countries kids along let them deal with it so if you want to feel sorry for a kid feel sorry for the ones here in the u.s.

    by: nonation from: santa monica
    December 27, 2012 11:13 AM
    Not only Russia but every country on Earth should prohibit u.s. Americans from adopting their children because the u.s.a. is human-rights violator #1 it being a nation of freedom and justice for some based on slavery of black folks only as 3/5ths of a person - Russia never imported slaves from Africa as far as i know and did Russia ever have a colony in Africa? Certainly not when it was the U.S.S.R.! If a child from Russia were to grow up in the U.S.A. it would stand a good chance of growing up to be a racist and or drug-dealer or killer-cop or cop-killer - any child born in the u.s.a. would be better off not being born amen?
    In Response

    by: Serious?
    December 27, 2012 3:33 PM
    Not sure if trolling or just mentally retarded...
    In Response

    by: ilaughed from: Michigan
    December 27, 2012 3:11 PM
    I laughed. Hard. Not sure if trolling, but I'll bite anyway. Comparing Russia's history to that of the United States is like comparing a glass of cyanide to a glass of prune juice. You may not necessarily like the prune juice, and it may make you defecate, but it isn't cyanide. No country in the history of the world was more corrupt or evil than the U.S.S.R. Not even Nazi Germany. The difference was that they were never exposed as publicly because of sympathizers who still exist to this day. Russia didn't need to export slaves from Africa - they enslaved their OWN citizens. Let's not even mention what they did to foreign nationals.
    In Response

    by: Jimmy Russels from: USSR
    December 27, 2012 3:06 PM
    Are you really that dumb?


    by: Anonymous
    December 27, 2012 10:53 AM
    This has to be the most childish action I've ever seen Putin do. Does this decision hurt the west? Not in the very slightest. Who does it hurt? Russians, why? More Russian taxes to be paid to look after these children (medical or daycare), more problems kept within Russia. If you think this is a slap to USA's face Putin, you are entirely wrong, this makes Putin look more like a baby himself. If anything this seems like a mild pathetic joke showing Russian goverments true colours. The only ones this harms is the Russian Gov and more importantly the children themselves. Now lets see the US Gov's moves now and start blocking each and every Russian Gov figure with human rights violations. Lets start by blocking Putin and ceasing his money, he violated human rights several times, last time being Chechnya.

    by: Viktor Zald from: Chicago Illinois
    December 27, 2012 10:47 AM
    Retaliation form a US law the "Magnitsky Ac" they did the same so several US politic with business in Russia like the Romney's may face some asset freeze, and the Adoption law is because of that situation from a a couple of Americans that adopted a Russian and they locked him inside the car at over 100* and killed him. so I think is fair poor kids that suffer and paid the price no matter witch way they go or stay.

    by: Wyatt Larew
    December 27, 2012 9:59 AM
    Putin did a great thing. Our leaders passed legislation that allows our government to legally execute through indefinite detention our own citizens. So they will just kill Americans not Russians? America is going to be the next Syria. Putin realizes this and is protecting his children from the atrocities the US Government is going to commit against it's own people.
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