News / Europe

Russia's Putin Says No Missiles Delivered to Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the European Union-Russian Federation (EU-Russia) Summit in Yekaterinburg, June 4, 2013.
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends the European Union-Russian Federation (EU-Russia) Summit in Yekaterinburg, June 4, 2013.
VOA News
Russian President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday that Moscow has not delivered advanced air-defense missiles to Syria, saying Russia does not want to upset the balance of forces in the Middle East.

Putin's comments are in line with Russian media reports last week that Moscow had not yet given the S-300 surface-to-air missiles to Damascus and that the system could not be delivered this year.

The Russian comments contradict an interview given last week by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to Hezbollah's Al-Manar TV in which he implied that Moscow had already delivered some of the missiles.

While Putin said the missile deal is not against international law, he added that Russia has not fulfilled the contract yet.

The United States and Israel have warned Russia against delivering the missiles, which would dramatically increase Syria's air defense capability.

Deployment of the S-300 system would likely complicate further possible Israeli airstrikes in Syria.

Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon said Monday that no Russian shipments of the missiles to Syria would take place before 2014. He did not elaborate on how he had arrived at his conclusion.

Last week, Ya'alon warned that Israel would "know what do to" if Russia fulfilled the delivery of the S-300 system.

Putin's comments came as Russia and the European Union ended two days of talks overshadowed by disputes over the EU's strong backing of the Syrian opposition and Moscow's continued support for the Syrian president.

The EU decided last week to lift its arms embargo on the Syrian opposition, clearing the way for member nations to supply weapons to anti-Assad fighters at a later date.

Russia and the United States continue to try to arrange an international peace conference that would bring together both the Syrian government and the opposition pushing to oust Assad.

​Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said Monday that the United States is not putting enough pressure on the Syrian opposition to participate in the international talks and drop its demand for Assad's exit.

The Syrian government has said it is willing to attend such a conference in principle. But the main opposition coalition has said talks are meaningless while Syrian troops backed by Hezbollah and Iranian personnel commit alleged atrocities against the Syrian people.

Russia has opposed any kind of foreign involvement and has used its veto power in the United Nations Security Council to block three proposed resolutions against the Syrian government.

On Tuesday, Putin again warned that any foreign military intervention in the 26-month-old Syria crisis would fail.

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by: Vladimir from: Ukraine
June 05, 2013 8:12 AM
if you think the S300 crap could deter the Israelis... you live in a dream world... Iraq had the S300 protecting its "Nuclear plant for medicinal isotopes..." and we all know what happened to that particular plant... Syria had the S300 protecting its "Nuclear Plant for dental surgery..." and we all know how long it took the Israelis to blow that one up... Now, Bashar had been warned twice... even for an Arab that should be enough... what do you think..??

by: david lulasa from: tambua,gimarakwa,hamisi,v
June 05, 2013 8:01 AM
where are russian and chinese peace keepers to syria?..or the conflict is just about backwardness with russia and china?....the west is now realising that waiting for poisonous gas that kills just like stoning or beating to be the deciding factor is just hypocrisy.


by: Anonymous
June 05, 2013 5:04 AM
Putin would never lie about this. If it was found out he was lieing to the world he would suddenly become entirely untrustworthy to the world. I believe he didn't deliver them. If he did not would be a better career move for him anyhow.

Bashar on the other hand is telling the world he has them to defend his criminal acts in Syria. Bashar has to realize that missiles will never keep himself from having to serve justice for his crimes.

by: Anonymous
June 05, 2013 3:08 AM
I can't wait for the Syrians to hang Bashar al Assad for crimes against the Syrian Nation. Bashar is the biggest terrorist in Syria, he killed and terrorized more innocent civilians than all groups added up in Syria.

by: b.rain
June 04, 2013 9:14 PM
USA news says no missiles delivered to Assad.
Russian news says missiles were delivered to Assad.
Is this some kind of silly joke or trolling?

by: Dr. Hollenbrook from: UK
June 04, 2013 1:51 PM
smart... very smart move... you really do not want to get into a technological war with US/Israel... jeopardizing your major military export revenue... S300 - will be known as Shit 300... hey Putin, stick to exports like drugs to Europe...
In Response

by: b.rain
June 04, 2013 9:16 PM
hey! Drugs to Europe is US-European business. By 2001 Taliban destroyed 99% of drug industry in Afghanistan. After 911 and US led invasion after Taliban was toppled from the power, Afghanistan produces 95% of all drugs in the world.

by: Kuniksha from: London
June 04, 2013 1:35 PM
hey "ema" Russia's eugenics program was a great success... it succeeded creating a bunch of drunken bloated ugly hairy drooling village imbeciles... with high IQ... well, "high" is relative to the rest of the village idiots...

by: JB from: USA
June 04, 2013 12:12 PM
Putin's just trying to use the ol' Jedi Mind Trick.

"You will find no missiles here. No missles have been delivered. These are not the missles you are looking for."

by: spotlessCrab from: MN
June 04, 2013 11:43 AM
It is wrong to take either side of this civil war especially when each side is said to have committed indefinable acts!
In Response

by: Anonymous
June 05, 2013 5:08 AM
You get bad apples in every barrel however... Bashar was the leader, and is currently comiting terrorist acts terrorizing the nation of Syria. He has killed tens of thousands of innocent civilians with his aeerial bombardments in neighborhoods. We the world know he is, and we know he should be facing justice. He's the first terrorist on the list that should be facing thousands of death penalties.

by: ema from: slough
June 04, 2013 9:47 AM
Russia is largely governed by a single individual; however he should not be underestimated. Long after the West stopped eugenics Russia was suspected of continued effort to employ a selective breeding programme. The system likely remains hidden because it does not prevent births, but uses a large military database to selectively breed the best of the best.

There is little evidence that the programme has been continued to the current day, however there remains little accountably in dismissing any leaks. One of several idealised Russian templates demanded a large size, high IQ, completely fearless with the critically path genetic traits of following orders.

In the West, there have been many calls for the end to selective breeding in dogs, where dogs such as blood hounds only exist because of human interference. We cannot forget the countless lives that form the failed foot note in history of eugenics.
In Response

by: JR from: Brazil
June 04, 2013 8:28 PM
What a story, dear citizen from slough! It seems a film by double zero seven, doesn't it?

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