News / Africa

Rwanda Demobilizes Some Child Soldiers

Former child soldiers begin reintegration process at Mutobo camp, Oct. 7, 2013. (Photo: Margaret Besheer for VOA)
Former child soldiers begin reintegration process at Mutobo camp, Oct. 7, 2013. (Photo: Margaret Besheer for VOA)
Margaret Besheer
Over the past 16 years, Rwanda has demobilized some 3,000 child soldiers. Yet as these efforts continue, the United Nations claims that Kigali has been helping a Congolese rebel group, the M23, recruit children in Rwanda to send to fight in the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo.
 
When Nizeyimani was a toddler, his parents left post-genocide Rwanda for the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo. They died there when he was four years old. When he was 12, he was abducted in the refugee camp where he lived by soldiers from the Rwandan Hutu group, the FDLR, and taken to live in the bush with the rebels. He says life was very difficult, and those who tried to escape were caught and killed.
 
A relative eventually helped him to make his way to the U.N. peacekeeping mission, MONUSCO, which works with the government of Rwanda to help disarm its nationals who are combatants in the eastern DRC.
 
Former FDLR fighters are first sent to the Mutobo demobilization camp where ex-fighters -- both men and boys -- stay for three months. This is where Nizeyimani began the process of reintegrating into Rwandan society. Former child soldiers are then sent to a rehabilitation center, where they receive counseling and medical screening and resume basic school studies while efforts are made to find their relatives.
 
Mutobo Demobilization Camp in Rwanda, Oct. 7, 2013. (Photo: Margaret Besheer for VOA)
Mutobo Demobilization Camp in Rwanda, Oct. 7, 2013. (Photo: Margaret Besheer for VOA)
Yet while Rwanda is working to help its own children come home, the head of MONUSCO's child protection section in Kinshasa, Dee Brillenburg Wurth, claims it is deliberately and systematically recruiting others to fight for the M23. Some of the children that have been recruited are as young as 11 years old. While MONUSCO cannot work outside of Congo, Brillenburg Wurth said they have anecdotal evidence that Rwanda is actively recruiting children.
 
“We know from children -- and this corroborated by other children and by adults -- that children are being recruited for example, we had an example of a football coach, of a police officer. At the beginning they told us they had this system in place, like a pyramid scheme; $5 for every child that was recruited,” explained Brillenburg Wurth.
 
She says that out of 122 children interviewed, 37 were Rwandan. Some were recruited in their country, others in Congo. Some thought they were being recruited by the Rwandan army, while others did not even know they were in the DRC.
 
“Many of them were abducted… this is very, very common with any armed group... You go and loot or you need to carry your arms from A to B, you just take kids from the villages and they don't let them go back. Most of the children, in fact nearly all of them, started their life as a M23 child carrying stuff from the Rwandan border,” continued Brillenburg Wurth
 
Rwandan Foreign Minister Louise Mushikiwabo vehemently denied that Rwanda recruits children.
 
“Our track record in terms of military is very clear: Rwanda does not tolerate children being enrolled in any way near armed groups, not in our own army,” stated Mushikiwabo.
 
She said that once the crisis in the eastern Congo is resolved and armed groups are eliminated, the recruitment of child soldiers will end as well.
 
The United States has exerted its own pressure on Rwanda, recently blocking military aid to Kigali over its recruitment of child soldiers.

You May Like

UN Watchdog Urges Israel to Probe Possible Gaza War Crimes

More than 2,100 Palestinians, most of them civilians, were killed in a 51-day war in Gaza, along with 67 Israeli soldiers and six civilians in Israel More

New Kenyan 'Thin SIMs' Poised to Transform African Mobile Money

Equity's new technology is approved in African nation for one-year trial, though industry leader Safaricom says thin SIMs could lead to data theft and fraud More

Solar's Future Looks Brighter

New technology and dropping prices are contributing to a surge in solar power More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Nyabirungu from: Kigali
October 09, 2013 1:44 AM
Indeed it's unfortunate that pple charged with peacekeeping turn around to be drumming up drums of war in the region with wrong information! If Rwanda since around 1996 started what was called Kadogo Schools to demobilize child soldiers from its army and has been doing the same with children frm FDLR, how come that the same country is placed in the same basket with countries like Burma, Yemen, CAR etc? This is the highest order of diplomatic treason!

In Response

by: Dan from: Kigali
October 10, 2013 4:57 AM
For all of Margaret Besheer's time spent analyzing Eastern Congo, I would expect a much more balanced perspective of such deeply unfounded "claims." (Associating Rwanda today with Child Soldiers is an act of treason). She has little idea of what she's talking about. These claims are unfounded, lack credibility and stems from continued backroom propaganda to destabilize Rwanda. The UN higher ups have little by little spoon fed this propanda mandate to its VOA correspondents with an agenda to use Rwanda as a scape goat to their own inability to bring peace and stability despite a 1.5B annual budget in the region. In other news Mrs. Bresheer has thought that the intervention brigade would be a potential "game changer" to the region. Simply pathetic. And how will the UN skew whatever data they'll get from those tens of millions being spent on drones flying over the jungle. The UN has lost its credibility. The "root problem" of Eastern Congo is primarily Kabila, who lets it's own army rape and pillage its own citizens (Even 126 women at one time last November!). Time for a balanced opinion and stop associating Rwanda with Child Soldiers. Embarressment to the credibility of your own organization and an embarressment to yourself. Ask any professional expat living in Rwanda for an extended period of time and they'll explain how ridiculous these assumptions are. The government and army are highly disciplined and wouldn't risk the political back fall of being associated with child soldiers. People who truly know the situation in Eastern DRC will give far more balanced opinions than Mrs. Besheer whose likely sitting in a comfortable New York office skimming through skewed UN reports making gross assumptions about a situation she actually knows very, very, little about.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
October 25, 2014 4:21 PM
Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Talks to Resume on Winter Gas for Ukraine

Ukrainian and Russian officials will meet again next week in an effort to settle their dispute over natural gas supplies that threatens to leave Ukraine short of heating fuel for the coming winter. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London the dispute is complex, and has both economic and geopolitical dimensions.
Video

Video Smugglers Offer Cheap Passage From Turkey to Syria

Smugglers in Turkey offer a relatively cheap passage across the border into Syria. Ankara has stepped up efforts to stem the flow of foreign fighters who want to join Islamic State militants fighting for control of the Syrian border city of Kobani. But porous borders and border guards who can be bribed make illegal border crossings quite easy. Zlatica Hoke has more.
Video

Video China Political Meeting Seeks to Improve Rule of Law

China’s communist leaders will host a top level political meeting this week, called the Fourth Plenum, and for the first time in the party’s history, rule of law will be a key item on the agenda. Analysts and Chinese media reports say the meetings could see the approval of long-awaited measures aimed at giving courts more independence and include steps to enhance an already aggressive and high-reaching anti-corruption drive. VOA’s Bill Ide has more from Beijing.
Video

Video After Decades of Pressure, Luxembourg Drops Bank Secrecy Rules

European Union finance ministers have reached a breakthrough agreement that will make it more difficult for tax cheats to hide their money. The new legislation, which had been blocked for years by countries with a reputation as tax havens, was approved last week after Luxembourg and Austria agreed to lift their vetoes. But as Mil Arcega reports, it doesn’t mean tax cheats have run out of places to keep their money hidden.
Video

Video Kobani Refugees Welcome, Turkey Criticizes, US Airdrop

Residents of Kobani in northern Syria have welcomed the airdrop of weapons, ammunition and medicine to Kurdish militia who are resisting the seizure of their city by Islamic State militants. The Turkish government, however, has criticized the operation. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from southeastern Turkey, across the border from Kobani.
Video

Video US ‘Death Cafes’ Put Focus on the Finale

In contemporary America, death usually is a topic to be avoided. But the growing “death café” movement encourages people to discuss their fears and desires about their final moments. VOA’s Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Ebola Orphanage Opens in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone's first Ebola orphanage has opened in the Kailahun district. Hundreds of children orphaned since the beginning of the Ebola outbreak face stigma and rejection with nobody to care for them. Adam Bailes reports for VOA about a new interim care center that's aimed at helping the growing number of children affected by Ebola.

All About America

AppleAndroid