News / USA

    Sanders, Clinton Campaign in SC; Trump, Rubio Trade Barbs

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at Central Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., joined by Sybrina Fulton, left, the mother of shooting victim Trayvon Martin, and former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords. (B. Allen/VOA)
    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at Central Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., joined by Sybrina Fulton, left, the mother of shooting victim Trayvon Martin, and former U.S. Representative Gabrielle Giffords. (B. Allen/VOA)

    Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton made last-minute appeals to voters in South Carolina on Friday, while Republican front-runner Donald Trump picked up a key endorsement from an old rival.

    Ex-Secretary of State Clinton is expected to easily win Saturday’s primary in South Carolina, where she has for weeks had a dominant, double-digit lead in opinion polls, thanks in part to her popularity among the state’s African-American voters.
     
    Sanders is hoping to make the contest as close as possible, but the Vermont senator appears to have largely given up on winning the state. In recent days, he has held rallies in other states where polls suggest he has a better chance.

    Signs stand in front of Bernie Sanders' campaign headquarters in Columbia, S.C. Sanders has mostly planned events outside the state prior to the Democratic primary on Saturday. (B. Allen/VOA)
    Signs stand in front of Bernie Sanders' campaign headquarters in Columbia, S.C. Sanders has mostly planned events outside the state prior to the Democratic primary on Saturday. (B. Allen/VOA)



    Clinton, who has a narrow delegate lead over Sanders after the first three nominating contests, continued her strategy Friday of focusing on her allegiance to President Barack Obama, the nation’s first black president.

    “I’m really proud to stand with President Obama, and I’m really proud to stand with the progress he’s made,” Clinton said at a rally in Kingstree. “I need your help, starting with this primary on Saturday."

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles as he stands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie before a rally in Fort Worth, Texas, Feb. 26, 2016.
    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles as he stands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie before a rally in Fort Worth, Texas, Feb. 26, 2016.

    Trump endorsement
     
    On the GOP side, Trump received a surprise endorsement Friday from New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who just weeks ago dropped out of the presidential race himself.

    “The single most important thing for the Republican Party is to nominate the person who gives us the best chance to beat Hillary Clinton,” Christie said at a news conference. “I can guarantee that the one person Hillary and [ex-President] Bill Clinton don’t want to see on that stage come next September is Donald Trump.”

    The move, Trump’s highest-profile endorsement yet, was unexpected, especially since Christie in recent months repeatedly had portrayed the billionaire businessman as unhinged emotionally and unfit to be president.

    The endorsement was timely for Trump, coming hours after a presidential debate where he was the target of repeated attacks by his main rivals, Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

    Republican U.S. presidential candidates Marco Rubio (L) and Donald Trump speak simultaneously at the debate sponsored by CNN for the 2016 Republican U.S. presidential candidates in Houston, Texas, Feb. 25, 2016.
    Republican U.S. presidential candidates Marco Rubio (L) and Donald Trump speak simultaneously at the debate sponsored by CNN for the 2016 Republican U.S. presidential candidates in Houston, Texas, Feb. 25, 2016.

    Flying insults

    The debate was dominated by personal insults, shouting and cross talk. A day later, the Republican candidates made it clear they weren’t finished fighting, with Trump making fun of the size of Rubio’s ears, and the Florida senator wondering whether the casino mogul might have urinated in his pants on stage.

    “Here’s a guy who’s a nervous basket case,” Trump said in a mocking tone at a campaign speech in Texas. “You ought to see him backstage. He was putting makeup on with a trowel.”

    After the crowd burst into laughter, Trump said: “Nah, I don’t want to say that. I will not say that he was trying to cover up his ears. I will not say that.” Later in the speech, he made fun of Rubio for sweating excessively and drinking too much water.

    Rubio, emboldened by his feisty debate performance, also continued to escalate his attacks on Trump. At a rally in Dallas, the senator accused Trump of having a “meltdown” backstage at the debate.

    “First, he had one of those makeup things applying around his mustache, because he had one of those sweat mustaches. Then, he asked for a full-length mirror, I don’t know why … maybe to make sure his pants weren’t wet,” Rubio said.

    The attacks represented an astonishing turn of events for the two candidates, who until Friday had largely refrained from attacking one another.

    According to analysts, the attacks were also a sign that Trump’s rivals fear he may begin running away with the Republican nomination after having won three of the first four states.

    Trump has a large lead in most of the states set to vote next week on Super Tuesday, when about half of the delegates needed to win the nomination will be up for grabs.

    You May Like

    Multimedia Obama Calls on Americans to Help the Families of Its War Dead

    In last Memorial Day of his presidency, Obama lays wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery

    The Strife of the Party: Will Trump Permanently Alter Republicans?

    While billionaire mogul's no-holds-barred style, high-energy delivery are what rocketed him to nomination, they also have created rift between party elites and his supporters

    China's Education Reforms Spark Protest

    Beijing is putting a quota system in place to increase the number of students from poor regions attending universities

    This forum has been closed.
    Comments
         
    There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Chinese-Americans Heart Trump, Bucking National Trendi
    X
    May 27, 2016 5:57 AM
    A new study conducted by three Asian-American organizations shows there are three times as many Democrats as there are Republicans among Asian-American voters, and they favor Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. But one group, called Chinese-Americans For Trump, is going against the tide and strongly supports the business tycoon. VOA’s Elizabeth Lee caught up with them at a Trump rally and reports from Anaheim, California.
    Video

    Video Chinese-Americans Heart Trump, Bucking National Trend

    A new study conducted by three Asian-American organizations shows there are three times as many Democrats as there are Republicans among Asian-American voters, and they favor Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. But one group, called Chinese-Americans For Trump, is going against the tide and strongly supports the business tycoon. VOA’s Elizabeth Lee caught up with them at a Trump rally and reports from Anaheim, California.
    Video

    Video Reactions to Trump's Success Polarized Abroad

    What seemed impossible less than a year ago is now almost a certainty. New York real estate mogul Donald Trump has won the number of delegates needed to secure the Republican presidential nomination. The prospect has sparked as much controversy abroad as it has in the United States. Zlatica Hoke has more.
    Video

    Video Drawings by Children in Hiroshima Show Hope and Peace

    On Friday, President Barack Obama will visit Hiroshima, Japan, the first American president to do so while in office. In August 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city to force Japan's surrender in World War II. Although their city lay in ruins, some Hiroshima schoolchildren drew pictures of hope and peace. The former students and their drawings are now part of a documentary called “Pictures from a Hiroshima Schoolyard.” VOA's Deborah Block has the story.
    Video

    Video Vietnamese Rapper Performs for Obama

    A prominent young Vietnamese artist told President Obama said she faced roadblocks as a woman rapper, and asked the president about government support for the arts. He asked her to rap, and he even offered to provide a base beat for her. Watch what happened.
    Video

    Video Roots Run Deep for Tunisia's Dwindling Jewish Community

    This week, hundreds of Jewish pilgrims are defying terrorist threats to celebrate an ancient religious festival on the Tunisian island of Djerba. The festivities cast a spotlight on North Africa's once-vibrant Jewish population that has all but died out in recent decades. Despite rising threats of militant Islam and the country's battered economy, one of the Arab world's last Jewish communities is staying put and nurturing a new generation. VOA’s Lisa Bryant reports.
    Video

    Video Meet Your New Co-Worker: The Robot

    Increasing numbers of robots are joining the workforce, as companies scale back and more processes become automated. The latest robots are flexible and collaborative, built to work alongside humans as opposed to replacing them. VOA’s Tina Trinh looks at the next generation of automated employees helping out their human colleagues.
    Video

    Video Wheelchair Technology in Tune With Times

    Technologies for the disabled, including wheelchair technology, are advancing just as quickly as everything else in the digital age. Two new advances in wheelchairs offer improved control and a more comfortable fit. VOA's George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Baby Boxes Offer Safe Haven for Unwanted Children

    No one knows exactly how many babies are abandoned worldwide each year. The statistic is a difficult one to determine because it is illegal in most places. Therefore unwanted babies are often hidden and left to die. But as Erika Celeste reports from Woodburn, Indiana, a new program hopes to make surrendering infants safer for everyone.
    Video

    Video California Celebration Showcases Local Wines, Balloons

    Communities in the U.S. often hold festivals to show what makes them special. In California, for example, farmers near Fresno celebrate their figs and those around Gilmore showcase their garlic. Mike O'Sullivan reports that the wine-producing region of Temecula offers local vintages in an annual festival where rides on hot-air balloons add to the excitement.
    Video

    Video US Elementary School Offers Living Science Lessons

    Zero is not a good score on a test at school. But Discovery Elementary is proud of its “net zero” rating. Net zero describes a building in which the amount of energy provided by on-site renewable sources equals the amount of energy the building uses. As Faiza Elmasry tells us, the innovative features in the building turn the school into a teaching tool, where kids can't help but learn about science and sustainability. Faith Lapidus narrates.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora