News / Asia

    No Sign of Missing Jet's Wreckage in Indian Ocean

    • Mike Barton, rescue coordination chief, right, shows Australia's Deputy Prime Minister, Warren Truss, the map of the Indian Ocean search areas during a tour of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority's rescue coordination center in Canberra, March 23, 2014.
    • Royal Australian Air Force pilot Capt. Russell Adams, left, speaks to the media after returning from a search mission in an AP-3C Orion at Pearce Base, Perth, Australia, March 23, 2014.
    • Ground crew members wave to a Japanese Maritime Defense Force P3C patrol plane as it leaves the Royal Malaysian Air Force base heading for Australia to join a search and rescue operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, Subang, Malaysia, March 23, 2014.
    • Royal Australian Air Force commander Craig Heap speaks to the media after Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's P-3C Orion arrived to help with search operations for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at Pearce Base in Perth, Australia, March 23, 2014.
    • Royal Australian Air Force Loadmasters prepare to launch a Self Locating Data Marker Buoy from a C-130J Hercules aircraft over the southern Indian Ocean, March 20, 2014. (AFP PHOTO / AUSTRALIAN DEFENSE/LEADING SEAMAN JUSTIN BROWN)
    • John Young, general manager of the emergency response division of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, answers a question as he stands in front of a diagram showing the search area for flight MH370 during a briefing in Canberra, March 20, 2014.
    • A Royal Australian Air Force pilot steers his AP-3C Orion over the southern Indian Ocean during the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in this picture released by the Australian Defense Force, March 20, 2014.
    • A Chinese family member of a passenger onboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 screams as she is being brought into a room outside the media conference area at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur International Airport, March 19, 2014.
    • An image in support of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 is seen on the United Malays National Organisation building in Kuala Lumpur, March 19, 2014.
    • Students watch as a group of artists finish a piece based on the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that was painted on a school ground in Makati city, metro Manila, Philippines, March 17, 2014.
    Australia has dispatched search planes for a third consecutive day to search the remote southern Indian Ocean for debris possibly from missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370, now lost for two full weeks.

    The international team hunting for the plane returned Saturday to an area about 2,500 kilometers southwest of Perth where an Australian satellite spotted two large objects earlier in the week.

    The searches have come up with no sign of wreckage in the area. Australia has cautioned that the objects might have no connection to the Boeing 777, carrying 239 passengers and crew.

    Lieutenant Tim McAlevey, a pilot from New Zealand, said he was disappointed but still hopeful searchers would find possible debris from the aircraft that was spotted by a satellite on March 16.

    "It's certainly disappointing and I've got every confidence that if there is an object there that we will find it and every time that we launch we hold that hope," he said. "However, we are just going to keep going until we find it.''

    Debris may have sunk

    The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.
    x
    The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.
    The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.
    Earlier, Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss told reporters in Perth it is possible that something floating on the sea that long ago may no longer be floating and may have sunk to the bottom of the Indian Ocean.
     
    Officials say three Australian Air Force P-3 Orions, the U.S. Navy’s P-8 Poseidon, and a long-range corporate jet carrying spotters from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority were involved in the search effort Friday. The planes are flying long trips from Perth to where the objects are believed to be located, more than 2,000 kilometers off shore.
     
    John Young, general manager of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, says searchers have changed tactics after radar detections failed to turn up anything on Thursday.
     
    "We have re-planned the search to be visual, so aircraft flying relatively low very highly skilled and trained observers looking out of the aircraft windows and looking to see objects, Young explained. "Of its nature, that means that aircraft are spaced more closely together and we will need more aircraft for a search of that type."
     
    Malaysian authorities said three Chinese aircraft and two Japanese P-3 Orion search planes were heading toward the southern corridor search zone. Transportation Minister Hishammuddin Hussein also told reporters in Kuala Lumpur Friday that Britain is sending the survey ship HMS Echo to the southern Indian Ocean. He said Malaysian officials plan to ask the U.S. defense secretary for more specialist search assets, including remotely operated vehicles for underwater salvage.

    Hishammuddin said China plans to join the search Saturday, with Japan, Britain and France providing additional assistance. But he said more help is needed.

    Chinese fleets

    Chinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane hasChinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane has
    x
    Chinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane has
    Chinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane has
    Earlier Friday, officials in Beijing said two fleets were about 4,000 to 5,000 kilometers away from the search area. China's Xinhua news agency says the navy ordered the ships to adjust their search focus and head to the area while continuing their search en route. According to the report, China's ice breaker Xuelong, or Snow Dragon was also joining the search, heading out from Perth.
     
    It is not clear how effective sending ships to the area will be.  Earlier this week, the American Navy called back the USS Kidd and its two MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopters. Officials said that with the search area expanding in the Indian Ocean, its sophisticated planes are more suited for the mission. 
     
    Expanded search area

    At the same time the search effort was expanding in the southern corridor, efforts continue in the Andaman Sea as well as in Kazakhstan, the farthest northern point it is believed the plane could have reached.
     
    Malaysian officials said Kazakhstan has confirmed that it has found no trace of flight MH370. But they say they are awaiting word from Kazakh authorities for permission to stage search efforts in the country.
     
    Passengers' families react

    In Beijing, the possibility that debris from the plane could be found weighed heavily on the families of those on board the missing flight. Walking in and out of a conference room at a hotel in Beijing where they can watch press conferences and are briefed by Malaysian airlines officials, many looked full of anxiety and anguish.
     
    While few were speaking with reporters Friday, some have already expressed hope that the debris will turn out to be another false lead. Many are still holding out hope that the plane was hijacked and the possibility that their loved ones may still be alive.
     
    Error rendering storify.

    You May Like

    Top US General: Turkish Media Report ‘Absurd'

    General Dunford rejects ‘irresponsible' claims of coup involvement by former four-star Army General Campbell, who led NATO forces in Afghanistan before retiring earlier this year

    Video Saving Ethiopian Children Thought to Be Cursed

    'Omo Child' looks at efforts of one African man to stop killings of ‘mingi’ children

    Protests Over Western Troops Threaten Libyan 'Unity' Government

    Fears mount that Islamist foes of ‘unity' government plan to declare a revolutionaries' council in Tripoli

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 2
        Next 
    by: Laari Karim Tahiru from: Ghana-Kintampo
    March 25, 2014 6:43 AM
    I was totally astonished when i heard the mission of the aircraft but i still pray that the plane should be found.

    by: David from: Uk
    March 22, 2014 4:51 AM
    Having flown with Malaysia Air out of KL around the same time as this flight I am engrossed in this story but one of my wonderings is, who is actually paying for the search?

    by: Freddy
    March 22, 2014 1:53 AM
    With regard to assistance in the search of the missing aircraft, what if any, has been Russia's contribution? satellite tracking, aircraft, naval vessels to assist in the search?. Concern for all those missing does appear to be a concern, indicative of humanitarian concern????????

    by: ALu from: PRC
    March 21, 2014 9:16 PM
    Malaysia may knew a lot from beginning than expected, the airplane definitely hijacked by the operator who had practiced for a period in home. He must knew more conditions of their own country, for example the airplane landing area. From this point and from the last track direction, the airplane may spend most time in Malaysia territorial air space. Thus the first pivot point is how to open the Malaysia officers` mouths.

    by: meanbill from: USA
    March 21, 2014 5:46 PM
    THE WISE MAN said it; ... The satellite pictures from Australia look like the ones that were presented when they searched for the 70ft Schooner "the Nina" lost at sea about June of 2013..
    COULD IT BE? ... The satellite photos of the suspected lost 70ft Schooner "the Nina" and the suspected lost Flight 370, are the exact same object being shown? ........ REALLY?

    by: merlino from: philippines
    March 21, 2014 1:51 PM
    i agree with mark from virginia. the families should go home with the rest of their loved ones. news comes as fast as they go and they can just watch it on TV or read papers while trying to get back to some sense of normality. they still will be the first one contacted for any news. prayers

    by: merlino from: philippines
    March 21, 2014 1:41 PM
    i'm with the families that are still holding their hopes that they are safe somewhere. the plane was hijacked not for the passangers but for other reason. prayers...

    by: meanbill from: USA
    March 21, 2014 12:50 PM
    Why would someone hijack a Malaysian 777-200ER airliner? .. Why would they do it, and for what purpose would they have done it? ... (to crash it?)..
    WHY? ... A Malaysian 777-200ER airline plane named "Super Range" flew from Boeing Field Washington, to Kula Lumpur Malaysia, a distance of 10,823 nautical miles, (20,044 km), in 21 hours and 23 minutes... (NOW?) .. Why would someone hijack this plane?).. WHOEVER hijacked the 777-200ER "Super Range" Malaysian airliner didn't do it to crash it in the ocean.. (They hijacked that plane for another reason.

    by: rohan baweja from: India
    March 21, 2014 12:33 PM
    US is one of the 26 countries helping in the search but what we haven't heard is if they are using their military drones in this search. US uses its base in diego garcia for a lot of military ops in Asia. They probably have enough hardware on this base to scope far south into the Indian ocean using their drones.

    by: Gary Patterson from: SW Florida
    March 21, 2014 11:50 AM
    Why does US Navy send a carrier to area, and use it's planes to search area. Be more feasible for longer air time searching. Believe a P3 can land and takeoff from a carrier.
    Comments page of 2
        Next 

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunitiesi
    X
    VOA News
    July 25, 2016 5:09 PM
    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
    Video

    Video London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunities

    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
    Video

    Video Recycling Lifeline for Lebanon’s Last Glassblowers

    In a small Lebanese coastal town, one family is preserving a craft that stretches back millennia. The art of glass blowing was developed by Phoenicians in the region, and the Khalifehs say they are the only ones keeping the skill alive in Lebanon. But despite teaming up with an eco-entrepreneur and receiving an unexpected boost from the country’s recent trash crisis the future remains uncertain. John Owens reports from Sarafand.
    Video

    Video Migrants Continue to Risk Lives Crossing US Border from Mexico

    In his speech Thursday before the Republican National Convention, the party’s presidential candidate, Donald Trump, reiterated his proposal to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border if elected. Polls show a large percentage of Americans support better control of the nation's southwestern border, but as VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from the border town of Nogales in the Mexican state of Sonora, the situation faced by people trying to cross the border is already daunting.
    Video

    Video In State of Emergency, Turkey’s Erdogan Focuses on Spiritual Movement

    The state of emergency that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has declared is giving him even more power to expand a purge that has seen an estimated 60,000 people either arrested or suspended from their jobs. VOA Europe correspondent Luis Ramirez reports from Istanbul.
    Video

    Video Calm the Waters: US Doubles Down Diplomatic Efforts in ASEAN Meetings

    The United States is redoubling diplomatic efforts and looking to upcoming regional meetings to calm the waters after an international tribunal invalidated the legal basis of Beijing's extensive claims in the South China Sea. VOA State Department correspondent Nike Ching has the story.
    Video

    Video Four Brother Goats Arrive in Brooklyn on a Mission

    While it's unusual to see farm animals in cities, it's become familiar for residents of Brooklyn, New York, to see a little herd of goats. Unlike gas-powered mowing equipment, goats remove invasive weeds quietly and without adding more pollution to the air. As Faiza Elmasry tells us, this is a pilot program and if it proves to be successful, the goat gardener program will be extended to other areas of New York. Faith Lapidus narrates.
    Video

    Video Scientists in Poland Race to Save Honeybees

    Honeybees are in danger worldwide. Causes of what's known as colony collapse disorder range from pesticides and loss of habitat to infections. But scientists in Poland say they are on track to finding a cure for one of the diseases. VOA’s George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Wall Already Runs Along Parts of US-Mexico Border

    The Republican Party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump, gained the support of many voters by saying he would build a wall to keep undocumented immigrants and drugs from coming across the border from Mexico. Critics have called his idea impractical and offensive to Mexico, while supporters say such a bold approach is needed to control the border. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from the border town of Nogales, Arizona.
    Video

    Video New HIV Tests Emphasize Rapid Results

    As the global fight against AIDS intensifies, activists have placed increasing importance on getting people to know their HIV status. Some companies are developing new HIV testing methods designed to be quick, easy and accurate. Thuso Khumalo looks at the latest methods, presented at the International AIDS conference in Durban, South Africa.
    Video

    Video African Youth with HIV Urge More Support

    HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is the top killer of teens in sub-Saharan Africa. But many youths say their experience with the virus is unique and needs to be addressed differently than the adult epidemic. VOA South African Correspondent Anita Powell reports.
    Video

    Video Pop-Up Art Comes to Your Living Room, Backyard and Elsewhere

    Around the world, independent artists and musicians wrestle with a common problem: where to exhibit or perform? Traditional spaces such as museums and galleries are reserved for bigger names, and renting a space is not feasible for many. Enter ArtsUp, which connects artists with venue owners. Whether it’s a living room, restaurant, office or even a boat, pop-up events are bringing music and art to unexpected places. Tina Trinh has more.
    Video

    Video Scotland’s Booming Whisky Industry Fears Brexit Hangover

    After Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, Scotland’s government wants to break away from the United Kingdom – fearing the nation’s exports are at risk. Among the biggest of these is whisky. Henry Ridgwell reports on a time of turmoil for those involved in the ancient art of distilling Scotland’s most famous product.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora