News / Asia

No Sign of Missing Jet's Wreckage in Indian Ocean

  • Mike Barton, rescue coordination chief, right, shows Australia's Deputy Prime Minister, Warren Truss, the map of the Indian Ocean search areas during a tour of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority's rescue coordination center in Canberra, March 23, 2014.
  • Royal Australian Air Force pilot Capt. Russell Adams, left, speaks to the media after returning from a search mission in an AP-3C Orion at Pearce Base, Perth, Australia, March 23, 2014.
  • Ground crew members wave to a Japanese Maritime Defense Force P3C patrol plane as it leaves the Royal Malaysian Air Force base heading for Australia to join a search and rescue operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, Subang, Malaysia, March 23, 2014.
  • Royal Australian Air Force commander Craig Heap speaks to the media after Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's P-3C Orion arrived to help with search operations for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane, at Pearce Base in Perth, Australia, March 23, 2014.
  • Royal Australian Air Force Loadmasters prepare to launch a Self Locating Data Marker Buoy from a C-130J Hercules aircraft over the southern Indian Ocean, March 20, 2014. (AFP PHOTO / AUSTRALIAN DEFENSE/LEADING SEAMAN JUSTIN BROWN)
  • John Young, general manager of the emergency response division of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, answers a question as he stands in front of a diagram showing the search area for flight MH370 during a briefing in Canberra, March 20, 2014.
  • A Royal Australian Air Force pilot steers his AP-3C Orion over the southern Indian Ocean during the search for missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in this picture released by the Australian Defense Force, March 20, 2014.
  • A Chinese family member of a passenger onboard missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 screams as she is being brought into a room outside the media conference area at a hotel near Kuala Lumpur International Airport, March 19, 2014.
  • An image in support of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 is seen on the United Malays National Organisation building in Kuala Lumpur, March 19, 2014.
  • Students watch as a group of artists finish a piece based on the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 that was painted on a school ground in Makati city, metro Manila, Philippines, March 17, 2014.
William Ide
Australia has dispatched search planes for a third consecutive day to search the remote southern Indian Ocean for debris possibly from missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370, now lost for two full weeks.

The international team hunting for the plane returned Saturday to an area about 2,500 kilometers southwest of Perth where an Australian satellite spotted two large objects earlier in the week.

The searches have come up with no sign of wreckage in the area. Australia has cautioned that the objects might have no connection to the Boeing 777, carrying 239 passengers and crew.

Lieutenant Tim McAlevey, a pilot from New Zealand, said he was disappointed but still hopeful searchers would find possible debris from the aircraft that was spotted by a satellite on March 16.

"It's certainly disappointing and I've got every confidence that if there is an object there that we will find it and every time that we launch we hold that hope," he said. "However, we are just going to keep going until we find it.''

Debris may have sunk

The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.
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The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.
The first, and larger, of the two objects spotted by the Australian satellite.
Earlier, Australia's Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss told reporters in Perth it is possible that something floating on the sea that long ago may no longer be floating and may have sunk to the bottom of the Indian Ocean.
 
Officials say three Australian Air Force P-3 Orions, the U.S. Navy’s P-8 Poseidon, and a long-range corporate jet carrying spotters from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority were involved in the search effort Friday. The planes are flying long trips from Perth to where the objects are believed to be located, more than 2,000 kilometers off shore.
 
John Young, general manager of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, says searchers have changed tactics after radar detections failed to turn up anything on Thursday.
 
"We have re-planned the search to be visual, so aircraft flying relatively low very highly skilled and trained observers looking out of the aircraft windows and looking to see objects, Young explained. "Of its nature, that means that aircraft are spaced more closely together and we will need more aircraft for a search of that type."
 
Malaysian authorities said three Chinese aircraft and two Japanese P-3 Orion search planes were heading toward the southern corridor search zone. Transportation Minister Hishammuddin Hussein also told reporters in Kuala Lumpur Friday that Britain is sending the survey ship HMS Echo to the southern Indian Ocean. He said Malaysian officials plan to ask the U.S. defense secretary for more specialist search assets, including remotely operated vehicles for underwater salvage.

Hishammuddin said China plans to join the search Saturday, with Japan, Britain and France providing additional assistance. But he said more help is needed.

Chinese fleets

Chinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane hasChinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane has
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Chinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane has
Chinese Antarctic research icebreaker Xue Long prepares to depart Fremantle Habor on March 21, 2014, as at least seven Chinese ships are reported to head for the southern Indian Ocean, where possible debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 plane has
Earlier Friday, officials in Beijing said two fleets were about 4,000 to 5,000 kilometers away from the search area. China's Xinhua news agency says the navy ordered the ships to adjust their search focus and head to the area while continuing their search en route. According to the report, China's ice breaker Xuelong, or Snow Dragon was also joining the search, heading out from Perth.
 
It is not clear how effective sending ships to the area will be.  Earlier this week, the American Navy called back the USS Kidd and its two MH-60R Sea Hawk helicopters. Officials said that with the search area expanding in the Indian Ocean, its sophisticated planes are more suited for the mission. 
 
Expanded search area

At the same time the search effort was expanding in the southern corridor, efforts continue in the Andaman Sea as well as in Kazakhstan, the farthest northern point it is believed the plane could have reached.
 
Malaysian officials said Kazakhstan has confirmed that it has found no trace of flight MH370. But they say they are awaiting word from Kazakh authorities for permission to stage search efforts in the country.
 
Passengers' families react

In Beijing, the possibility that debris from the plane could be found weighed heavily on the families of those on board the missing flight. Walking in and out of a conference room at a hotel in Beijing where they can watch press conferences and are briefed by Malaysian airlines officials, many looked full of anxiety and anguish.
 
While few were speaking with reporters Friday, some have already expressed hope that the debris will turn out to be another false lead. Many are still holding out hope that the plane was hijacked and the possibility that their loved ones may still be alive.
 
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by: Tonha from: Bangkok
March 21, 2014 11:48 AM
I really appreciated about this so much with hopeful that they are 239 people on safe . Now feel really I don't understand some big countries they are smart in produce weapon to fight with world and proclaimed themselves are wonder-great , oh that is great? Now I want to say if any one or your technology are great please come search for Malaysia air line , if you are smart please start your point , if who can found that is really great ..if you are great please help 239 people back with safetily
In Response

by: Mark from: Virginia
March 21, 2014 10:28 PM
Humans are smart. Now, try this for an experiment to see how 'smart' you are....
Take and object, a very small object (preferably something very valuable to a family member, something they cannot live without or wish to part with). Go outside at night with that object, close your eyes, turn once in complete circle and without opening your eyes, throw that object into the air as hard as you can. Then, still with eyes closed, make another spin (so you don't know exactly where you threw the item)... then go inside. Next morning, start searching your yard for the missing item (after telling your family member what you did so they can start badgering you to find it, and not stop looking until you do). For added frustration, ask your neighbors to help you look for it, so they can tramp and tromp across your yard , pointing out all the little things they find thinking they found your missing item, and possibly stomping out all traces of the item you tossed as they search.
Now, do that, and you might have a small idea of the enormity of what Malaysian officials have to put up with on a daily basis. and for all your supposed great intelligence, good luck in your search. Only, for the current tragedy, its not one valuable object lost, but 239 valuable objects lost.

by: Stan from: USA
March 21, 2014 11:25 AM
If the plane was programed to fly via auto pilot until running out of fuel, the possibility of seeing jet fuel on the water is not too likely?

by: larry from: usa
March 21, 2014 11:16 AM
I think officials should stop making guesses to the event so the public won't get more upset.
For example, Australian officials said they saw some "thing" with satellite. By the time their boat or plane got there, they found nothing, that "thing" probably sank.

by: Mark from: Virginia
March 21, 2014 7:37 AM
what I do not understand, and yes, I have been in situations similar to what the Chinese relatives are going through (ie. waiting on potentially devastating news regarding a loved one), is why many of the Chinese relatives remain in these hotels awaiting news, and not just go home and try to resume their lives while they wait for news. Why put themselves through such agony every day far from their homes, yearning for every small tidbit of hope for what has become a hopeless situation for those on that flight.

The fact that there has been absolutely no contact (cellphone, ransom, etc.) with the missing passengers would indicate that they are no longer alive. What are they expecting..? It is only increasing their frustration and anger toward someone/something that is doing everything in their power to resolve. 26 nations are involved in the search. They are doing everything humanly possible and then some.

I know they have to be devastated, but there is a limit to what one should expect and that limit has long passed now. Face facts that the passengers are gone and move on. It may take years to find any clues, they may never find the plane, are those relatives going to forever haunt the scene waiting for any news that may never arrive...? Go home, pick up your lives and move on. Start whatever healing process you rely on and find some closure to this. Putting themselves through the wringer every day is not healthy, or helping anyone.

It is only making a difficult situation even worse for them, and intensifying the pressure on those who already have a load of pressure on them from this tragedy. And the media needs to keep a more respectful distance and quit with all the theory talk and nonsense.
In Response

by: cyril from: south africa
March 22, 2014 6:29 AM
Its sade but i have to agree with Mark ,the jet is missing for 2 weeks now and no sighn of it at all,this is not gonna be easy to move on with your life and thinking of your love ones some where out there.
In Response

by: Sheila from: California
March 21, 2014 12:22 PM
I agree, all of the theories and assumptions is getting to be to much. I don't think every idea or guess(whether educated or not) needs to be put out there. Let's try and stick to the facts. PLEASE!
In Response

by: trinice from: ne
March 21, 2014 10:21 AM
That is not easy to just let go not knowing what happened to your loved one's. Easier said than done. I am pretty sure they appreciate all the help that everyone is doing, but to not know what happened to your child, your mother, your spouse, I mean it's so mind boggling to move on. I didn't know anyone on that plane, but I constantly think about all sorts of reasons to why did this happened, or where are all of those people who were on that plane. I have even thought about the possibility of them all being held hostage somewhere. Thefamilies of the missing people will more than likely won't have a peace of mind until they know something, which is very understandable...May God be with the missing, rheir family and also the searcher's until the end of this mystery.
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