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Top US Diplomat Meets With India PM Modi

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the latter's residence in New Delhi, India, Aug. 1, 2014.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the latter's residence in New Delhi, India, Aug. 1, 2014.
VOA News

The top U.S. diplomat has met with India's new prime minister.

John Kerry met Narendra Modi for the first time Friday; the third day of Kerry's trip to India.

Their meeting in New Delhi comes a day after a World Trade Organization session in Geneva where India blocked reforms over demands to allow it to sell stockpiled food to the poor at subsidized prices. 

WTO rules say stockpiled food can only be sold at market prices.

Officials said Kerry urged Modi to work with the U.S. to move the WTO process forward.

Delegates at the WTO meeting said they missed a deadline for passage of the reforms, and expressed concern that consequences could be significant.

WTO members agreed in principle last year to streamline and standardize global customs rules.

U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman said the customs reforms would have cut trade costs and generated hundreds of billions of dollars in much needed economic activity.

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by: Mary
August 02, 2014 3:28 PM
Good grief. Just how much plastic surgery has Kerry had on his face now ? What a self absorbed narcissist.

by: Vanamali from: Chicago
August 02, 2014 2:37 PM
I agree with most of the posters - these western countries society is different - notice they don't talk about the subsidies that they give to farmers to grow the crops and pass it on at a lower rate. Huge companies like Tyson chicken get huge tax breaks - that is why most sandwiches at McDonald's come so cheap. These countries give breaks at the front end - to the farmer - that they have no problem in continuing, but India is doing it at the back end, which they don't do - so here they come preaching - disgusting creepy people with no values or principles

by: Manjunath Rao from: Chicago, IL
August 02, 2014 1:12 PM
Well it is really a very narrow minded vision to focus only on billions of dollars of revenue lost. The people who provide the dollars lost argument forget that there is something more important and more precious than money. That is food. Although we do not acknowledge the value of food ordinarily, food is the most precious item necessary for survival, and the poor know this more than the rich. And the poor have a right to cooperate for survival. The poor cooperate by pooling their meager tax revenues for the benefit of all by redistributing it through subsidies. This is no different from car pooling or bike sharing systems provided by local city governments. If food subsidies have to be abolished then abolish public transportation, ride sharing arrangements, bike sharing arrangements etc all of which are meant to meet the needs of the poor through a charge on public exchequer.

by: Dan from: LA
August 01, 2014 11:42 PM

Now they will punish India by maligning its leader Mr. Modi. There will be a lot of negative articles and very preachy western attitude. Suck it up guys, Mosi has the backbone, you need to learn to eat sour grapes. Modi's predecessor MMS was the favorite of the west because he did what ever the west wanted. Modi is different.

by: Dan
August 01, 2014 11:36 PM
The WTO agreement and the Monsanto's GMO cotton has caused so much aggravation for Indian farmers and thousands have committed suicide. they killed themselves because of shame of not being able to provide for their family. The west does not care about that.

The real issue here as I read in more than 1 article is that India and other poor nations stock pile their food because they have such a large number of poor people. This helps these countries distribute food to the poor as the need and demands changes and unexpected rain failure. Many of these nations depend on rain for agriculture and do not have sufficient modern irrigation system. This sounds so reasonable and WTO would not allow this. Does not make sense. WTO is ruled by western nations and large corporations, and they do not want these countries to stock pile so that they could sell them food and grain during times of shortages. Go figure.

by: RALPH RAO from: SAN DIEGO,CALIFORNIA
August 01, 2014 10:13 PM
THE POOR PEOPLE NEED A HELPING HAND. THEY HAVE GOT TO EAT,LIKE ANY ONE ELSE,TO LIVE. NOTHING WRONG WITH THE INDIAN GOVERNMENT WANTING TO FEED THE POOR.BY ALL MEANS,SUBSIDIZE THE FOOD PRICE FOR THE POOR.HOW ELSE CAN THEY SURVIVE?

IF I WERE A MULTI-MILLIONAIRE,I WOULD GLADLY HAVE PURCHASED THE FOOD AND DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE POOR IN INDIA.I WOULD EVEN HAVE SET-UP DAIRY FARMS AND PROVIDED AFFORDABLE MILK AND CHEESE.
INDIANS TEND TO BE VEGETARIANS. I WOULD HAVE PROVIDED AFFORDABLE VEGETABLES.
SINCE THEY NEED CLOTHING AND MEDICAL CARE, I WOULD HAVE TAKEN CARE OF THAT.

I FEEL FOR THEM,BECAUSE I WAS BORN IN INDIA.
THESE ARE MY PEOPLE. I CARE FOR THEM.
I URGE THE WEALTHY, TO HELP THE POOR.
HIS HOLINESS THE POPE PRAYS FOR THE POOR,TOO.

RALPH RAO
SAN DIEGO

by: Rameshwar Singh from: USA
August 01, 2014 9:38 PM
Starving poor in India are more important than WTO agreement. Unless industrialization progresses fast in India and more employment are created, people below poverty level must be provided subsidized food. Unlike advanced countries in the world where food prices are roaring up, India can't afford such policies of neglect of humanity.

by: Anonymous
August 01, 2014 5:17 PM
Is it wrong to sell stockpiled food to the poor at subsidized prices?

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