World News

Security Council to Consider Delay in ICC Kenyatta, Ruto Trials



The United Nations Security Council is set to consider a resolution that could delay the crimes against humanity trials of Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy.

Three African nations on the Council -- Rwanda, Togo and Morocco -- plan to present the resolution Friday. The measure would ask the International Criminal Court to delay the trials of Mr. Kenyatta and Kenyan Deputy President William Ruto for one year.

Both men are accused of orchestrating ethnic violence after Kenya's 2007 presidential election that killed more than 1,100 people.

The resolution needs at least nine votes on the 15-member Council to pass. Rwanda's deputy head of mission to the U.N., Olivier Nduhungirehe, told VOA Thursday that seven nations plan to vote yes.



"Besides the three African countries, we have Azerbaijan, Russia, China and Pakistan, and we hope that during these 24 hours remaining, we will continue to engage some of (the other Council members) to get the two votes needed," he said.





Mr. Ruto's trial began in September. Mr. Kenyatta's trial was due to begin this month but was postponed until February.

Kenya has argued the two men cannot spend long periods of time in The Hague while Kenya tries to fight the threat of regional terrorism. Somali militant group al-Shabab attacked a Nairobi mall in September, killing more than 60 civilians.

Some Kenyan and African leaders have also accused the ICC of having a bias against Africans. Every person prosecuted by the ICC to date has come from an African country.

In another development, the court in The Hague said 20 victims of post-election violence had decided to withdraw from the ICC case against Mr. Ruto and Joshua Arap Sang, a radio executive who is being tried alongside Mr. Ruto.

In a Thursday statement, the ICC said the decision to withdraw could have been motivated by a range of factors, including security concerns.

Court documents published in July said two witnesses in the case against President Kenyatta had withdrawn their testimony.

One of the witnesses cited safety concerns. The second witness' concerns were not specified.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
A Small Oasis on Kabul's Outskirts Provides Relief From Security Tensionsi
X
May 26, 2015 11:11 PM
When people in Kabul want to get away from the city and relax, many choose Qargha Lake, a small resort on the outskirts of Kabul. Ayesha Tanzeem visited and talked with people about the precious oasis.
Video

Video A Small Oasis on Kabul's Outskirts Provides Relief From Security Tensions

When people in Kabul want to get away from the city and relax, many choose Qargha Lake, a small resort on the outskirts of Kabul. Ayesha Tanzeem visited and talked with people about the precious oasis.
Video

Video Film Festival Looks at Indigenous Peoples, Culture Conflict

A recent Los Angeles film festival highlighted the plight of people caught between two cultures. Mike O'Sullivan has more on the the Garifuna International Film Festival, a Los Angeles forum created by a woman from Central America who wants the world to know more about her culture.
Video

Video Kenyans Lament Losing Sons to al-Shabab

There is agony, fear and lost hope in the Kenyan town of Isiolo, a key target of a new al-Shabab recruitment drive. VOA's Mohammed Yusuf visits Isiolo to speak with families and at least one man who says he was a recruiter.
Video

Video Scientists Say Plankton More Important Than Previously Thought

Tiny ocean creatures called plankton are mostly thought of as food for whales and other large marine animals, but a four-year global study discovered, among other things, that plankton are a major source of oxygen on our planet. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video US-led Coalition Gives Some Weapons to Iraqi Troops

In a video released Tuesday from the Iraqi Ministry of Defense, Iraqi forces and U.S.-led coalition troops survey a cache of weapons supplied to help Iraq liberate Mosul from Islamic State group. According to a statement provided with the video, the ministry and the U.S.-led coaltion troops have started ''supplying the 16th army division with medium and light weapons in preparation to liberate Mosul and nearby areas from Da'esh (Arabic acronym for Islamic State group).''
Video

Video Amnesty International: 'Overwhelming Evidence' of War Crimes in Ukraine

Human rights group Amnesty International says there is overwhelming evidence of ongoing war crimes in Ukraine, despite a tentative cease-fire with pro-Russian rebels. Researchers interviewed more than 30 prisoners from both sides of the conflict and all but one said they were tortured. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.
Video

Video Washington Parade Honors Those Killed Serving in US Military

Every year, on the last Monday in the month of May, millions of Americans honor the memories of those killed while serving in the armed forces. Memorial Day is a tradition that dates back to the 19th Century. While many people celebrate the federal holiday with a barbecue and a day off from work, for those who’ve served in the military, it’s a special day to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice. Arash Arabasadi reports for VOA from Washington.
Video

Video Kenya’s Capital Sees Rise in Shisha Parlors

In Kenya, the smoking of shisha, a type of flavored tobacco, is the latest craze. Patrons are flocking to shisha parlors to smoke and socialize. But the practice can be addictive and harmful, though many dabblers may not realize the dangers, according to a new review. Lenny Ruvaga has more on the story for VOA from Nairobi, Kenya.
Video

Video Rolling Thunder Run Reveals Changed Attitudes Towards Vietnam War

For many US war veterans, the Memorial Day holiday is an opportunity to look back at a divisive conflict in the nation’s history and to remember those who did not make it home.
Video

Video Female American Soldiers: Healing Through Filmmaking

According to the United States Defense Department, there are more than 200-thousand women serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.  Like their male counterparts, females have experiences that can be very traumatic.  VOA's Bernard Shusman tells us about a program that is helping some American women in the military heal through filmmaking.

VOA Blogs