News / Middle East

Burns: US Will Not Impose its Model on Egypt

Egypt's interim President Adli Mansour (R) meets with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns at El-Thadiya presidential palace in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
Egypt's interim President Adli Mansour (R) meets with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns at El-Thadiya presidential palace in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
VOA News
U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns said the United States will not try to impose its model of democracy on Egypt and that it recognizes only Egyptians can determine their future.

Burns met in Cairo Monday with leaders of the new military-installed interim government as it attempts to move ahead with a transition plan.

Burns, the first senior U.S. official to visit Egypt since the army removed Morsi, said he "did not come to lecture anyone."
 
"My message has been simple," he said. "The United States remains deeply committed to Egypt's democratic success and prosperity. We want a strong Egypt, an Egypt which is stable, democratic, inclusive and tolerant."

He also told reporters Egypt is in no danger of repeating the Syrian tragedy because its leaders "understand the dangers of polarization," adding that the key to success is "ensuring a sense of inclusion at every stage of the political transition."

Burns is also expected to meet with civil society and business leaders during his Cairo visit, which lasts through Tuesday.

The State Department said that in all his meetings, Burns would underscore U.S. support for the Egyptian people, an end to all violence, and a transition leading to an inclusive, democratically elected civilian government.

The U.S. administration has been criticized both by Morsi supporters and opponents for what each side has perceived as support for the other.

The Muslim Brotherhood and other Egyptians continue to protest the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi less than two weeks ago.

Egypt's army said it would respond with "utmost severity and force" if demonstrators tried to approach or break into its bases.

The Muslim Brotherhood and other Morsi supporters have been maintaining a protest outside Cairo's Rabia el-Adawiya Mosque, demanding Egypt's first democratically-elected president be returned to power.

Brotherhood spokesman Mohamed Baltagi insisted that his camp won't accept the new interim regime.

He said there would be a 'Million Man march' Monday in all the public places across Egypt for people to declare that they have chosen their leaders, their institutions, their constitution and that they will prevail.

Anti-Morsi demonstrators also vow to keep demonstrating in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

The Tamarud group, which initiated protests in Tahrir Square that toppled Morsi, held a press conference to insist that its supporters would remain there to prevent the ousted leader from returning to power.

  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi offer their Friday prayer where protesters have installed their camp and held their daily rally, at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi offers his Friday prayer where protesters have installed their camp and held their daily rally, at Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • A supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi holds up a sign with an image of Morsi as they protest at the Rabaa el-Adawiya square where they are camping in Cairo, July 19, 2013. 
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi hold up placards as they shout slogans during a demonstration where protesters have installed their camp, at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • Egyptian riot police stand guard during a demonstration by supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi, demonstrate near Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Mohamed Morsi make a fire to stop the effects of tear gas fired by riot police in central Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi wears an Islamic veil which reads "There is no god but God, Mohammed is the messenger of God," during a rally in front of Cairo University, July 16, 2013.
  • A firework fired by opponents of ousted President Mohamed Morsi explodes during clashes in downtown Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block Giza square during a march near Cairo University, where protesters have been camped out, Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A member of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi cools people off during afternoon prayers at the Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A Morsi supporter arranges flags for sale in Nasr city, Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi attaches a poster at a blocked road linked to the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, July 15, 2013.
  • An Egyptian soldier keeps watch from atop a military vehicle in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, July 14, 2013.

But VOA's Edward Yeranian in Cairo said the punishing summer heat and grueling daylight fast for Ramadan kept the streets of Cairo empty most of Monday, despite calls by secular and Islamist groups to protest. Ordinary Egyptians appeared to ignore the verbal jousting, going about business as usual.

Meanwhile, Egyptian Army helicopters tossed pamphlets over the mostly empty Rouba Adawiya protest camp, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been holding a daily vigil. The pamphlets urged protesters to abstain from violence and respect their political opponents.

Egyptian Army commander and Defense Minister, General Abdel Fattah al Sissi also defended the army's role in the recent overthrow of Morsi, insisting that the ousted president had split Egyptian society in two and created conflicts with most of the institutions of state. He rejected accusations that the move was religiously motivated.

The general said the army is at the service of the people and only got involved in politics because the people asked it to do so.  He insisted that former President Morsi picked quarrels with the courts, the police, the people and the army, and that the army could not accept such behavior.

Morsi has been held at an undisclosed location since his removal, while a number of senior Muslim Brotherhood members have been taken into custody. Authorities have not charged the former president with a crime, but say they are investigating a series of complaints against him including spying and wrecking the economy.

Also Monday, Egyptian authorities said suspected militants attacked a bus carrying factory workers in the north Sinai town of El-Arish, killing at least three people and wounding 17 others. The Sinai Peninsula has seen a rise in violence since Morsi's July 3 ouster.

Edward Yeranian in Cairo contributed to this report

You May Like

Sydney Hostage-taker Failed to Manipulate Social Media

Gunman forced captives to use personal Facebook, YouTube accounts to issue his demands; online community helped flag messages, urged others not to share them More

UN Seeks $8.4 Billion to Help War-Hit Syrians

Effort aimed at helping Syrians displaced within their own country and those who've fled to neighboring ones More

Who Are the Pakistani Taliban?

It's an umbrella group of militant organizations whose objective is enforcement of Sharia in Pakistan 'whether through peace or war' More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US: Response to Sony Hack Will Be Proportionali
X
Aru Pande
December 19, 2014 1:45 AM
The White House says President Barack Obama considers the cyberattack on Sony Corp. a serious national security matter and that the U.S. will counter with an "appropriate response." VOA correspondent Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video US: Response to Sony Hack Will Be Proportional

The White House says President Barack Obama considers the cyberattack on Sony Corp. a serious national security matter and that the U.S. will counter with an "appropriate response." VOA correspondent Aru Pande reports.
Video

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

The school dropout rate is at an all-time high in Sudan's South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during the three-year civil war between the government and SPLA-N rebel forces. Adam Bailes visited Sudan's Nuba Mountains' region and reports many children are simply too scared to go to school
Video

Video Nigerians Fleeing Boko Haram Languish in Camp Near Capital

In its five-year effort to impose Islamic law in northeastern Nigeria, the Boko Haram extremist group has killed thousands of people and forced hundreds of thousands to flee. Some of those who ran for their lives now live in squalor on the edges of the capital, Abuja. Chris Stein reports for VOA.
Video

Video Putin Says Russian Economy Will Emerge Stronger

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said his country's sinking economy will not only recover but also become stronger, despite falling oil prices and Western sanctions over Ukraine. VOA's Daniel Schearf reports.
Video

Video Detained Turkish Journalists Follow Teachings of US-Based Preacher

The Turkish government’s jailing of critical journalists has sparked international condemnation and is being seen as an effort to undermine the followers of an ailing Turkish preacher based in the United States. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky has more.
Video

Video ‘Anti-Islamization’ Marches Increase Tensions In Germany

Anti-immigrant rallies in Germany have been building in recent weeks, peaking Monday night in the city of Dresden where tens of thousands of people turned out to demonstrate against what they call the ‘Islamization’ of the West. Germany has offered asylum to more Syrian refugees than any other country, and this appears to have set off the protests. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Aceh Rebuilt Decade After Tsunami, But Scars Remain

On December 26, 2004 there was an earthquake in the Indian Ocean so powerful it caused the Earth’s axis to wobble a few centimeters. Onshore on the island of Sumatra, the resulting tsunami was devastating. A decade later, VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from Banda Aceh, Indonesia, where although there is little remaining evidence of the physical devastation, the psychological scars among survivors remain.
Video

Video Refugees Living in Kenya Long for Peace in the Home Countries

Kenya is host to numerous refugees seeking safe haven from conflict. Immigrants from Somalia face challenges in their new lives in Kenya. Ahead of International Migrants Day (December 18) Lenny Ruvaga has more for VOA News from the Kenyan capital.

All About America

AppleAndroid