News / Middle East

Burns: US Will Not Impose its Model on Egypt

Egypt's interim President Adli Mansour (R) meets with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns at El-Thadiya presidential palace in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
Egypt's interim President Adli Mansour (R) meets with U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns at El-Thadiya presidential palace in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
VOA News
U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns said the United States will not try to impose its model of democracy on Egypt and that it recognizes only Egyptians can determine their future.

Burns met in Cairo Monday with leaders of the new military-installed interim government as it attempts to move ahead with a transition plan.

Burns, the first senior U.S. official to visit Egypt since the army removed Morsi, said he "did not come to lecture anyone."
 
"My message has been simple," he said. "The United States remains deeply committed to Egypt's democratic success and prosperity. We want a strong Egypt, an Egypt which is stable, democratic, inclusive and tolerant."

He also told reporters Egypt is in no danger of repeating the Syrian tragedy because its leaders "understand the dangers of polarization," adding that the key to success is "ensuring a sense of inclusion at every stage of the political transition."

Burns is also expected to meet with civil society and business leaders during his Cairo visit, which lasts through Tuesday.

The State Department said that in all his meetings, Burns would underscore U.S. support for the Egyptian people, an end to all violence, and a transition leading to an inclusive, democratically elected civilian government.

The U.S. administration has been criticized both by Morsi supporters and opponents for what each side has perceived as support for the other.

The Muslim Brotherhood and other Egyptians continue to protest the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi less than two weeks ago.

Egypt's army said it would respond with "utmost severity and force" if demonstrators tried to approach or break into its bases.

The Muslim Brotherhood and other Morsi supporters have been maintaining a protest outside Cairo's Rabia el-Adawiya Mosque, demanding Egypt's first democratically-elected president be returned to power.

Brotherhood spokesman Mohamed Baltagi insisted that his camp won't accept the new interim regime.

He said there would be a 'Million Man march' Monday in all the public places across Egypt for people to declare that they have chosen their leaders, their institutions, their constitution and that they will prevail.

Anti-Morsi demonstrators also vow to keep demonstrating in Cairo's Tahrir Square.

The Tamarud group, which initiated protests in Tahrir Square that toppled Morsi, held a press conference to insist that its supporters would remain there to prevent the ousted leader from returning to power.

  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi offer their Friday prayer where protesters have installed their camp and held their daily rally, at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi offers his Friday prayer where protesters have installed their camp and held their daily rally, at Nasr city, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • A supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi holds up a sign with an image of Morsi as they protest at the Rabaa el-Adawiya square where they are camping in Cairo, July 19, 2013. 
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi hold up placards as they shout slogans during a demonstration where protesters have installed their camp, at Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt, July 19, 2013. 
  • Egyptian riot police stand guard during a demonstration by supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi, demonstrate near Tahrir Square in Cairo, July 17, 2013.
  • Supporters of Mohamed Morsi make a fire to stop the effects of tear gas fired by riot police in central Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi wears an Islamic veil which reads "There is no god but God, Mohammed is the messenger of God," during a rally in front of Cairo University, July 16, 2013.
  • A firework fired by opponents of ousted President Mohamed Morsi explodes during clashes in downtown Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi block Giza square during a march near Cairo University, where protesters have been camped out, Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A member of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi cools people off during afternoon prayers at the Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A Morsi supporter arranges flags for sale in Nasr city, Cairo, July 15, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi attaches a poster at a blocked road linked to the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, July 15, 2013.
  • An Egyptian soldier keeps watch from atop a military vehicle in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, July 14, 2013.

But VOA's Edward Yeranian in Cairo said the punishing summer heat and grueling daylight fast for Ramadan kept the streets of Cairo empty most of Monday, despite calls by secular and Islamist groups to protest. Ordinary Egyptians appeared to ignore the verbal jousting, going about business as usual.

Meanwhile, Egyptian Army helicopters tossed pamphlets over the mostly empty Rouba Adawiya protest camp, where Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been holding a daily vigil. The pamphlets urged protesters to abstain from violence and respect their political opponents.

Egyptian Army commander and Defense Minister, General Abdel Fattah al Sissi also defended the army's role in the recent overthrow of Morsi, insisting that the ousted president had split Egyptian society in two and created conflicts with most of the institutions of state. He rejected accusations that the move was religiously motivated.

The general said the army is at the service of the people and only got involved in politics because the people asked it to do so.  He insisted that former President Morsi picked quarrels with the courts, the police, the people and the army, and that the army could not accept such behavior.

Morsi has been held at an undisclosed location since his removal, while a number of senior Muslim Brotherhood members have been taken into custody. Authorities have not charged the former president with a crime, but say they are investigating a series of complaints against him including spying and wrecking the economy.

Also Monday, Egyptian authorities said suspected militants attacked a bus carrying factory workers in the north Sinai town of El-Arish, killing at least three people and wounding 17 others. The Sinai Peninsula has seen a rise in violence since Morsi's July 3 ouster.

Edward Yeranian in Cairo contributed to this report

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid