News / Asia

Singapore Cemetery Demolition Angers Residents

The ornate tile detail on one of the many overgrown graves at Singapore's Bukit Brown Cemetery. (VOA/K. Lamb)
The ornate tile detail on one of the many overgrown graves at Singapore's Bukit Brown Cemetery. (VOA/K. Lamb)
Kate Lamb
The ultra-modern city state Singapore has become a model that other Asian nations aspire to - organized, immaculate and efficient - but at what cost? Some residents say that plans to plow through one the country’s most important heritage sites show that Singapore’s rapid urbanization has reached a crucial tipping point.
 
The sprawling overgrown rainforest of Bukit Brown is less than a 10-minute cab ride from the heart of Singapore.

A haven for nature lovers and joggers, the lush 23 hectares is also a cultural treasure.

Dotted amongst the large moss-covered banyan trees and ferns are some 100,000 traditional Chinese graves dating back to the 1800s.

The ornate tombstones of many famous Singaporeans, some who are now immortalized in the city’s street names, reside at Bukit Brown Cemetery. But they might not rest in peace for too much longer.

Demolition plan

The Singaporean government recently announced plans to build an eight-lane highway through the ancient graveyard.

Some 4,000 graves will be exhumed, including that of Ong Hui Lin’s great grandmother. “It’s a tragedy that is no longer mine, but maybe the nation's. Lost families, you know and lost heritage. The idea of family, family unity, ancestors and descendants, these ideas are very important,” said Ong.

Ong, 56, is a fourth generation Singaporean who has visited the graves of her ancestors at Bukit Brown for as long as she can remember. The retired schoolteacher says the plan will destroy an important symbol of Singaporean history and culture.

“In Bukit Brown, every grave and every cluster of grave tells the family history. It is just something that is unique. People say that dead men can’t tell stories, but these do because the stories are standing there and staring at you," Ong stated. "And it’s beautiful, it’s not something ugly, it’s beautiful and it’s just so sad that it’s got to go.”

Save Bukit Brown

A dilapidated gate at the historic Bukit Brown Cemetery, home to 100,000 traditional Chinese graves. (VOA/K. Lamb)A dilapidated gate at the historic Bukit Brown Cemetery, home to 100,000 traditional Chinese graves. (VOA/K. Lamb)
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A dilapidated gate at the historic Bukit Brown Cemetery, home to 100,000 traditional Chinese graves. (VOA/K. Lamb)
A dilapidated gate at the historic Bukit Brown Cemetery, home to 100,000 traditional Chinese graves. (VOA/K. Lamb)
Several groups are campaigning to save Bukit Brown, believed to be the largest Chinese cemetery outside of China.

In a country where political protest is a rarity, supporters of Bukit Brown are quite vocal.

Groups such as the Singapore Heritage Society say there are alternatives for the proposed road, which is expected to support new housing developments.

Tay Kheng Soon is the former president of the Singapore Institute of Architects who says the idea that land is scarce in the city state is pure fiction. “It is a useful fiction because it increases land prices," he said. "Because of the presumed scarcity therefore the price goes up. That’s the way in which the state generates high land values in order to cream off for the state’s coffers.”

Tay says the state getting rich is not necessarily a bad thing. But he argues that the rapid urbanization of Singapore is reaching a crucial tipping point, on the verge of becoming an ultra modern state with no soul.

“I think that increasingly, Singaporeans - and I think decision makers - are becoming more aware that the soft aspect of Singapore is important, identity is important, but it has yet to be translated into monetizable values. So Singapore has reached this moment in history where it is beginning to realize that there’s something that’s missing,” Tay noted.

As the country rapidly modernizes, and more and more foreigners become permanent residents, Bukit Brown is a reminder of a Singapore that was.

Material anchor

Sociologist Terence Heng says the cemetery is a kind of material anchor for the Chinese diaspora. “It’s a reminder of who we were and the fact that it has now been overgrown because it was closed in the 1970s, it is a bit of a parable of what we could become if we chose certain paths in life,” he added.

The government says it considered alternative routes for the new road, but none was found.  The plan to cut through Bukit Brown, it says, will have the least impact.

Accompanied by traditional ceremony, some graves have already been exhumed and moved to a nearby columbarium.

Construction of the highway is expected to begin early this year.

For more information, visit bukitbrown.com

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
January 25, 2013 7:07 PM
An old unused cemetery in Singapore is demolished and a modern highway is being consructed. The cemetery anywhere is waste of living space. The cemetery is for the dead where as the living has no space now and for the future generations.

Thers is no room in many cemeteries even for the dead. The cost of new cemetaries is exhorbitant and the cost of burial is skyroketing. The small city state of Singapore need more space for the living than the dead.

The future burials in the cemeteries should be allowed only if it is unmarked graves and no monuments are constructed on top of graves. All existing mounments in the cemeteries should be demolished after 50 years of its existence to make room for the present and future generation of the living or the dead.

It is preferable for the disposal of the dead in the sea or incineration. The Hindus in India prefer burning of the dead on a funeral pyre. But lot of wood is used for the burning. There is another religion in India known as the Parsis who offer the dead body as food for the vultures. In India, the local governments have started providing incinerators for the disposal of the dead at a very cheap cost or at no cost. The cutting of trees and use of wood is reduced by the use of public incinerators.

All the above methods of disposal of the dead body are preferable to the Christian, Moslem, Jewish or Chinese burials. The burials are monopolized by various religions and their respective cemeteries. Where can the dead body of a person of no religious affiliation can be buried?

Incineration is cheaper, environmentally ideal and affordable even to the poorest. It is preferable to add the conviniences of the living and the future generations than that of the forgotten rich dead.
In Response

by: Kent Neo from: Singapore
January 28, 2013 4:01 AM
I would disagree with Thanjan on the note that the cemeteries of the rich dead is competing with the living. Although Singapore maybe small in size, building residential flats with a higher plot ratio has enabled efficient use of land. According to a report from Singapore's National Climate Change Secretariat, we have a total of 5600 ha of nature reserves and parklands (see http://app.nccs.gov.sg/page.aspx?pageid=113 accessed 28 Jan 2013). That would translate to 8 m2 of green space per person based on Singapore's projected population of 7 million by 2040.

The World Health Organization (WHO), in its concern for public health, produced a document on the subject stating that every city should have a minimum of 9 m2 of green space per person. An optimal amount would be between 10 and 15 m2 per person. If the 233 ha natural rain forest habitat of the Bukit Brown site is protected, at least when our population reaches 7 million, every Singaporean would still have 8.3 m2 of green space to breath.

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