News / Asia

New China Train Station Attack Sparks Terrorism Fears

Investigators are seen on the square of Guangzhou railway station after a knife attack in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province, May 6, 2014.
Investigators are seen on the square of Guangzhou railway station after a knife attack in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province, May 6, 2014.
Shannon Van Sant
The third attack at a train station in China in a little more than two months is sparking fears of terrorism.    
 
Attacks in ChinaAttacks in China
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Attacks in China
Attacks in China
The midday stabbing attack Tuesday left six people injured at a train station the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou.  

China’s Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said whoever carried this attack out will be brought to justice.  The Chinese government will take firm actions to safeguard the lives of the Chinese people, she vowed.  

Chinese state run media reported that police gunned down one of the attackers, captured a second and said two attackers were still at large.  A local newspaper reported the attackers were wearing white hats. 

Previoius attacks

Two suicide bombers killed three people and injured 79 others in an attack at a train station in Urumqi, the capital of China’s Xinjiang Province, last weekend.  On March 1, a group of men and women killed 29 people and injured another 143, slashing people with knives at a train station in the southwestern Chinese city of Kunming.  

China’s government blamed the incidents on terrorists from Xinjiang separatist movements.  

During a visit to Xinjiang Province last week, President Xi Jinping vowed to fight terrorism with an iron hand, implement development to benefit the common people and strengthen military presence in the region.  

Beijing Foreign Studies University Visiting Professor James Liebold said the attacks are embarrassing for the Chinese leadership.

“And then you have this attack at the train station which was clearly meant to send a signal to Xi and the state that at least some Uighurs, at least the two attackers in Urumqi, did not buy into his vision of the Chinese dream," he said. 

The latest attack occurred in one of China’s largest cities and transportation hubs.  Photos broadcast on CCTV showed paramedics treating people in the large public square of the Guangzhou railway station.

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Comments
     
by: Avrg Joe from: avrg earth
May 07, 2014 12:40 AM
Chinese are honest and straight forward.
any other country in the west does the same politics, but with lies, so fake... it all looks nice, but the the agenda is hidden.
come on, people. wake up.
China is a great country, with hard worker people.
and we are all human, we all have the same needs, rights and obligations, regardless the passport issuer place.


by: SEATO
May 06, 2014 12:59 PM
China's oppression of the poor Chinese peasants and the ethnic Chinese provides a catalyst to all these troubles. China Communists came to power by driving their people to war with the old communist propaganda :"Rise up all the enslaved people of the World ! " , so they should expect this kind of setbacks


by: sense from: sensible
May 06, 2014 10:53 AM
Let me guess, now Americans are sympathizing all of a sudden with their arch nemesis china, simply because the lowly and oppressed are fighting back? So typical. A morally bankrupt state, crushes a certain group of people (Muslims in Xinjiang) for decades, torturing them with every means, and now they are fighting back with what they have (in this case knives), and the citizenry of the world is expected to feel sorry for the abusive state. Give me a break. Everything has a reaction.

Amnesty International was documenting GROUP RAPE of Uighur women (Muslim) by Chinese soldiers. Give me an effing break. This is just like America after 9/11. Everyone was expected to feel sorry for the same Americans who had killed more then 2 million people in Iraq alone. But just as was the case with America, i fully expect the docile and complicit world to buy into this crap. Even Han Chinese who forcibly have their second children aborted will hate Muslims rather then hate the ones who off their children in the womb!

In Response

by: jonathan huang from: canada
May 06, 2014 1:45 PM
@nonsense!
Why Chinese should hate their leader for not allowing a second child, since all Chinese high rank officials have also only one child? google it you id!0t! how many kids Hu jingtao has, how many kids Xi jinping has. as long as the leaders follow the same law, there is no dispute, no conflict. on the other hand, minorities including Uygurr, can have more than one kid, and go to university with lower mark points. you call that oppression, discrimination? give me a break, you ignorant!

In Response

by: Ben
May 06, 2014 12:52 PM
I think you're confusing sorrow for the victims of these attacks with sorrow for the Chinese government. We sympathize with the victims first and foremost. Don't forget that almost all of these victims the past few attacks are innocent civilians just going about their days in train stations. Tell me, how are civilians in Guangzhou responsible for oppression in Xinjiang? Why were they deliberately targeted by these attackers?

Your twisted logic is the same reasoning used by terrorists. "I want my political goals to become reality, but I'm encountering difficulty or resistance. I need to deliberately kill innocent civilians to intimidate people into giving me what I want." It doesn't matter if they want to have a country of their own in the case of Uighurs or they want American troops out of Saudi Arabia in the case of Al Qaeda prior to 9/11. It's all terrorism, and you're sympathizing with it.

Also, you're completely wrong on Iraq. Total deaths (militants and civilians) are closer to 150,000 according to the Associated Press, and the circumstances surrounding their deaths are completely different than what this news story is talking about.

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