News / Asia

    6 US Troops Killed by Afghan Counterparts

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    VOA News
    U.S. and Afghan military officials say six American troops were killed Friday by Afghan government personnel.

    In the first incident Friday morning, officials said an Afghan police commander shot and killed three special operations Marines in the Sangin district of Helmand province. Afghan authorities say the commander invited the Marines to a meal at his checkpoint in southern Afghanistan and then fled the scene after opening fire.

    A Taliban spokesman said the attacker joined the insurgency after the shootings.

    In the second attack, officials said that Friday night, an Afghan civilian employee working at a NATO base not far from the earlier shooting turned a gun on NATO members, killing three American troops.  

    The latest shooting was the fourth time this week that international forces have been fired on by their Afghan counterparts.

    NATO troops killed an Afghan solider Thursday who tried to gun down coalition service members at a military base in eastern Afghanistan.

    On Tuesday, NATO says two gunmen wearing Afghan National Army uniforms killed a coalition soldier in the east.

    About 34 coalition service members have been killed this year in so-called "green-on-blue" attacks. "Green on blue" is a reference to the color of Afghan and NATO uniforms.  

    NATO spokesman Brigadier General Gunter Katz told reporters in Kabul on Saturday that the "isolated" incidents "don't reflect the overall situation" in Afghanistan and will have "no effect" on the security transition. 

    Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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    Comments
         
    by: Shawn Riddick from: Roseville Ca
    August 14, 2012 9:04 PM
    What Islamic Nation on earth is going to respect America?... gay soldiers... drones killing innocent children... soldiers eating unclean food...executing the enemy wounded... the United States has lost this war as it lost the war in Iraq. I forgot what the purpose of this war was for? To create a democratic nation or was it for something else? Maybe this war was for the alien agenda to destroy the United States of America and separate us from Islamic allies in a war to free our planet from the aliens who have enslaved America. It is a fact satanic aliens have bases under our soil and directly control US Armed Forces Command, Intelligence Agencies, and our Executive branch of Government. Satanic aliens have complete control of our media and major corporations. Mind Control and human beings being used as Avatars are fact not fiction. Maybe you could read my letter at warningfromgod before it is too late. And yes I was the target of assassination by our government but I guess the retribution by God was a little too high and a order of protection was placed on me. Free Afghanistan? Please free America first!

    by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
    August 11, 2012 8:58 AM
    As it was reported in the February 2012 issue of the Armed Forces Journal that "American troops in Afghanistan have nothing but contempt for the Afghan troops." A U.S. officer -not identified by name- told the journal: "Afghans hate us, and we don't trust them!," on quote. Afghan men join the army and the police for the salary that helps them avoid the abject poverty and high unemployment in the country, not to kill their countrymen opposing the U.S. occupation -be they Taliban or not.

    Then, there is the order of battle that makes Afghan army recruits go berserks. The U.S. commanders puts the Afghan soldiers at the front of the battle with Taliban, where either kill the Taliban or be killed themselves, while the U.S. troops stay behind to back them up. And since they had joined the Afghan army just for the salary to survive in a war-torn country - and not to kill or be killed- they hate the Americans! The killing of U.S. army troops by Afghan troops is, therefore, an unavoidable backlash among forcibly allied hostile troops. Nikos Retsos, retired professor
    In Response

    by: Malek Towghi, Ph.D. from: USA
    August 13, 2012 5:33 PM
    Nikos Retsos is right about most of the Pashtuns, about 40% of the population of Afghanistan; he is dead wrong about the rest. I don't blame American troops for being fed up in the Afghan mess created by the ISI-duped Bush Administration.. However, the professor's tone is that of a typical ultra 'politically correct'.

    We overthrew the Taliban, almost all Pashtun and Pakistan trained & supported, with the help and good wishes of exclusively Non-Pashtuns of Afghanistan, the Northern Alliance and the Non-Pashtuns of the southwest. The irony is that we are leaving Afghanistan by handing over power to a Pashtun-dominated government deeply infiltrated by the ISI of Pakistan and infected by typical Pashtun racism cum Islamic fanaticism.
    In Response

    by: Unnamed from: a
    August 12, 2012 1:18 PM
    Your assessment is dead wrong professor. I recommend you come out here and see the ground truth. Being in an advisor mission, doing what these guys who were killed were doing i can say the Afghans want to take up the fight and are eager to go after the Taliban. Many of the Soldiers I deal with have had family members killed by the Taliban. My advice before you post something so matter as factly is have your facts straight. Try experiencing things first hand before quoting some random officer with a small soda straw view of his AO.
    In Response

    by: Teddy from: New York
    August 12, 2012 8:40 AM
    That's the problem, Afghan Troops and citizens don't want to step up to the plate and take their country back. It's been high hell and high water, too much time has passed, and they haven't picked up the pace. That's too bad the Afghan Troops join the army just for a paycheck and not to take back their country. And if the U.S. commanders put them up front with battles against Taliban and it makes them go berserk, so be it.....Americans are tired of losing young soilers in this war for the freedoms the Afghans don't want to stand up for. When we are in war when your enemy is among your liberating citizens it's not a traditional war and it's time to pull out and approch it it from a different and un-conventional perspective.
    In Response

    by: Martin Thomas from: Afghanistan
    August 11, 2012 11:03 PM
    For a retired professor you really don't know much about that which you speak. Afghans are never in the front, in fact they rarely take the lead on anything, which is why we're still trying to turn over security responsibilities to them. The larger problem is Afghanistan is not a country in the way those of us in the western world would define country. It is a large land mass with artificial boundaries based on nothing more than other world powers dictating where those boudaries end. There is no combined sense of national pride or effort from those we call Afghans as they are more concerned about survival based on familial and tribal affiliations. Despite the numerous modern era device seen in the region, Afghanistan is culturally stuck in the 16th century. As for not wanting to kill their countymen, that is a load of crap. I have seen more brutality in the name of Afghan justice over the last 3 years than I have seen anywhere else other than Hollywood. They also have no problem killing others from lesser tribes/villages in order to take what they desire. So before you go blaming the United States for the way the Afghans react (and I would easily agree our policy/strategy over here has been discombobulated at best) you should take into account that they allowed a group with an agenda of hate, train and plan attacks on our nation on their soil and refused to give the leaders of that group up. They (the Taliban) provided us the excuse to conduct this war and now as we try to return control of security to those who would now be in power we see how and why the Taliban were able to come into power in the first place.

    by: Teddy from: New York
    August 11, 2012 8:42 AM
    My heart and soul go out to these soilder families. I just don't understand how our intelligent gathering is so poor within our own compounds that the commanders don't see the threat. Commanders need to address the troops about social invitations by Afghan Nato Forces as well as constant threats of rouge Afghan Troops, Police, Civilians. If we can't do this, then it's time to get out of Afghanistan, it's been too long, too expensive on lives and money and the Afghans haven't stepped up their game and they don't want us there. By the way, thanks Bush and Cheney for getting us into this mess.

    by: Chris from: USA
    August 11, 2012 8:34 AM
    Blue on blue means friendly fire. Blue force is a reference to friendly forces, because in the military's system of symbols friendly forces are in blue. Red is the color of enemy forces. Green is the color of neutral forces. While not entirely consistent with these colors and symbols, green on blue means local national force on friendly force. It has nothing to do with the color of uniforms. Afghan Police have blue uniforms. NATO and US use many different colors, but vast majority are green or other earth tones. Your explanation of the jargon makes me think you are taking a guess instead of reporting facts.

    by: CPT B from: Camp Shelby
    August 11, 2012 8:11 AM
    "'Green on blue' is a reference to the color of Afghan and NATO uniforms."

    That is not correct.

    The color reference is to military maps and graphics. On a map, overlay or electronic representation, friendly forces are represented by blue, allies by green, and enemies by red.

    by: Jett Rink from: USA
    August 11, 2012 8:08 AM
    There is nothing to be gained by staying any longer. Bring our troops home and let them sort it out between themselves. With a little luck, maybe the Arab Spring will take root there and eventually lead to some stability.

    by: Popsiq from: Canada
    August 11, 2012 7:33 AM
    If such "isolated events" continue as they have this past week, Brigadier General Katz isn't long for Kabul.

    But then the overall situation from Kabul is always rosier than the actual situation in the field.

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