News / USA

Snowden's Asylum Options Dwindle

Reuters
Countries in Latin America, Asia and Europe spurned asylum requests by Edward Snowden on Tuesday, despite a call by Venezuela for the world to protect the former U.S. spy agency contractor wanted by Washington for espionage.

Snowden, who revealed the secret U.S. electronic surveillance program Prism, has applied for political asylum in more than a dozen countries in his search for safety from prosecution in the United States.

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The 30-year-old American is in legal limbo in the transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport, unable to fly out because he has no legal travel documents and also has no Russian visa to leave the airport.

On Monday, he broke a nine-day silence since arriving in Moscow from Hong Kong, challenging Washington by saying he was free to publish more about its programs and that he was being illegally persecuted.

That ruled out a prolonged stay in Russia, where a spokesman for President Vladimir Putin said Snowden had withdrawn his request for asylum after the Russian leader said he should stop "harming our American partners".

But while country after country denied his asylum requests on technical grounds, Venezuela, part of an alliance of leftist governments in Latin America, said it was time to stop berating a man who has "done something very important for humanity".

"He deserves the world's protection," President Nicolas Maduro told Reuters during a visit to Moscow for a meeting of gas exporting countries.

"He has a right to protection because the United States in its actions is persecuting him ... Why are they persecuting him? What has he done? Did he launch a missile and kill someone? Did he rig a bomb and kill someone? No. He is preventing war."

Maduro said he would consider an asylum application. He later had talks with Putin but neither leader said whether they had discussed Snowden.

The American's request for safety in Ecuador, which has sheltered the founder of antisecrecy group WikiLeaks Julian Assange in its London embassy, has seemingly ended.

Bolivian President Evo Morales, also in Moscow for the gas conference, told Russia's RT television that his country would consider an asylum request but had not yet received one.

U.S. President Barack Obama has made clear to a number of countries that granting him asylum would carry costs.

"Mistake"

Snowden has prepared asylum requests in countries including India, China, Brazil, Ireland, Austria, Bolivia, Cuba, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Norway, Poland, Spain, Switzerland and Venezuela, WikiLeaks has said.

But several countries, including Snowden's favored Ecuador, said on Tuesday they could not consider an asylum request from Snowden unless he was on their territory.

Norway said he was unlikely to get asylum there, Brazil ruled out even answering his request and Poland said it would not give a "positive recommendation" to any application.

Finland, Spain, Ireland and Austria said he had to be in their countries to make a request, while India said "we see no reason" to accept his petition. France said it had not received a request and China's Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said she had no information on Snowden's asylum request.

Officials in Russia, which has made clear it wants Snowden to leave, say an embassy car would be considered foreign territory if a country picked him up.

Snowden's options have narrowed sharply.

Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa has said he cannot consider the asylum request and that giving Snowden a temporary travel pass to fly to Moscow was "a mistake on our part".

Moscow is unwilling to send Snowden to the United States, a move that could make it look weak, and it has no extradition treaty with Washington. But it also does not want to damage ties with the United States over a man with whom Putin, a former KGB spy, has little sympathy.

At a meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Brunei, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said he had raised Snowden "from our point of view" despite the affair not being in their domain.

"Russia has never extradited anyone, is not extraditing anyone and will not extradite anyone," Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters.

Peskov said Snowden showed no sign of stopping releasing secret U.S. documents and added that he had abandoned his intention of staying in Russia.

In an undated letter to Ecuador's Correa seen by Reuters, Snowden said he was "dedicated to the fight for justice in this unequal world". "I remain free and able to publish information that serves the public interest," Snowden said in the letter.

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Comments
     
by: grace from: egypt
July 03, 2013 6:11 AM
Snowden is a HERO!!!


by: Anonymous
July 03, 2013 6:05 AM
David Thanjan you are another USA sucker, Snowden is a Hero!!!


by: oldlamb from: Guangzhou
July 03, 2013 5:03 AM
I don't think China and Rusia should grant Snowden's asylum requests,China and Rusia can do what U.S.has been doing about cyber surveillance program.Snowden's technology are not shortage in these two countries,but some countries like Venezuela in Latin America,it's significant for they to learn.So should permit Snowden's asylum requests.


by: GH1618 from: USA
July 03, 2013 12:23 AM
It's a mystery to me where Snowden gets the idea that he is being "illegally persecuted." Traditionally, spies have known very well that they were doing something illegal, and subject to prosecution (or worse) if caught, so took care to be discreet. Snowden chooses instead to thumb his nose at authority then complain of "persecution" when they come after him? Clueless.


by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
July 02, 2013 9:50 PM
What the traitor Snowden urgently need at the Moscow airport is not passport, visa or asylum, but clean underwear from Russia!


by: Mark T
July 02, 2013 9:08 PM
right or wrong, Snowden is digging his own grave right now, and is stepping into it. His actions, however right and just he might have started this whole affair, is not looking good for him now. It would be in his best interest now to just return to the U.S. and face whatever consequences are awaiting him. Flight from justice never made anyone look innocent. I am not condoning what the U.S. has done, but Snowden's actions now are not making his case any easier on him.

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