News / USA

Snowden Clemency Appeal Rejected

This photo provided by The Guardian newspaper shows Edward Snowden, who worked at the National Security Agency, in Hong Kong on June 9, 2013.
This photo provided by The Guardian newspaper shows Edward Snowden, who worked at the National Security Agency, in Hong Kong on June 9, 2013.
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VOA News
Edward Snowden’s plea for clemency in the United States appears headed to rejection.

A White House adviser, Dan Pfeiffer, during an appearance on the news program “This Week,” said no clemency offers were being discussed and that the NSA leaker should return to the U.S. to face charges.

"Mr. Snowden violated U.S. law," Pfeiffer told Reuters. "He should return to the U.S. and face justice."

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) Chairwoman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, also appeared to be against granting any kind of concession to Snowden.

Rogers said clemency was a “terrible idea,” and Feinstein said Snowden should have reported his concerns through official channels.

She called his actions a "enormous disservice to our country."

The comments come in the wake of Snowden’s “manifesto” published in the German magazine Der Spiegel in which he pled for clemency, saying his revelations about the scope of NSA surveillance was spurring a valuable debate.

“Instead of causing damage, the usefulness of the new public knowledge for society is now clear because reforms to politics, supervision and laws are being suggested," he wrote.

Snowden remains in Russia, where he has been granted temporary asylum.

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by: Gerald Wilhite
November 05, 2013 10:30 AM
Information is power. Pay attention to the man with the information. He wants to talk.

One would think that our all-powerful government would have learned to listen to the bold young man who has kept them on their knees for six months.


by: Anonymous
November 04, 2013 2:05 PM
Mr. Snowden has failed not only US but also those who was and are victims of brutal terrorists and dictators even in Africa.


by: heather from: usa
November 04, 2013 1:12 PM
He is a hero


by: Ken
November 04, 2013 12:03 PM
I think Snowden shouldn't face charges, he stood up too the government for breaking the 4th amendment and stood up to protect the US citizens. That's more loyalty he has shown.


by: Robert from: Cincinnati
November 04, 2013 12:02 PM
I think the man did a great service to the people of this country. Our government has become to powerful. All he did was let everyone know that one of our constitutional rights was being violated.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
November 04, 2013 11:53 AM
No clemency, no amnesty. Though he has not been charged, what he committed is a spurious felony punishable in Russia and USSR by death penalty. Surprises me why Russia of all places in the world is the place Snowden chooses to ply his trade and live for asylum. Surely Russia, though I'm beginning to like the country for its incisive, decisive and resolute pursuit of its diplomacy, does not condone leaking of its spying program, not even to allow Pussy Riot, Green Peace or any other freedom activist the freehand that Edward Snowden claims he's selling to the world.

If not for treachery, why did he not choose to ply his trade in any other place in the world where freedoms, liberties and socializing are in vogue? No, Edward Snowden deserves serious prosecution and commensurable punishment. His action was pointedly geared toward benefiting terrorism and jeopardizing security, though those whom it benefits have their minds beclouded by error, who want secrecy when everything else has been laid bare?

Let me ask, why is America secretive about things it should treat in the open and open up things that should be laid in secrecy? Like sexuality, homosexuality and same-sex marriage? Americans will like to carry placards to spell themselves out to be gay but do not want the security services to know what they discuss on phones. Is this truly ironical, or is it showing America as Quack place or an odd world?


by: William reeves from: Chattanooga,tn
November 04, 2013 11:43 AM
he should be stripped of his citizenship and permanently banned from us soil


by: Alan from: NM
November 04, 2013 11:16 AM
I think that he finally recognized that his action snowballed ( no pun intended ) into his current predicament. Living in Russia is no picnic for someone used to live in our free society.


by: eric from: washington
November 04, 2013 11:13 AM
Really he should come back to face charges because he broke the law..... what about the 10-20 million illegal immigrants that are felons oh yea they are democrats making the party stronger so its OK.

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