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Sochi Olympics Begin With Spectacular Opening Ceremony

Sochi Olympics Begin With Spectacular Opening Ceremonyi
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February 08, 2014 2:06 AM
Competition begins in earnest Saturday at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia's Black Sea resort city of Sochi. The Games kicked off Friday with a glitzy opening ceremony that organizers hoped would paint a shining image of post-Soviet Russia. VOA's Mike Richman has more.

Sochi Olympics Begin With Spectacular Opening Ceremony

Mike Richman
Competition begins in earnest Saturday at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia's Black Sea resort city of Sochi. The Games kicked off Friday with a glitzy opening ceremony that organizers hoped would paint a shining image of post-Soviet Russia.

Brand-new Fisht Olympic Stadium was a sea of Russian color and pageantry Friday.  

There, the opening ceremony for the Sochi Olympics featured Russian music, plus ballet stars, acrobats and cosmonauts, and many other entertainers.

Athletes from the more than 80 nations competing in Sochi packed the 40,000-seat stadium, as did Olympic fans from all over the world.

  • Fireworks are seen over the Olympic Park during the opening ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • Actors perform during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympic Games, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • A general view shows a scene from the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • The colors of the Russian flag are seen during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • A general view shows the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • A scene from the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach of Germany talks to Russian President Vladimir Putin during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • Flag-bearer Todd Lodwick of the U.S. leads his country's contingent during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.
  • OlympicsA map of Canada is projected onto the stadium floor as athletes march in during the opening ceremony of the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, Feb. 7, 2014.

World leaders

More than 40 world leaders were in attendance, including Russian President Vladimir Putin and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

VOA Moscow bureau chief James Brooke was also there. He spoke to VOA by Skype.

“Yes, it was really a celebration that Russia’s back, a celebration of Russian pride, stretching through 400 years of Russian history, from Peter the Great building the navy, all the way up to the Soviet cosmonauts exploring space," said Brooke. "There were ballerinas; there were references to the classical authors Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, music by Stravinsky, Tchaikovsky.  Very stirring, and huge applause by the crowd of 40,000.”

After the customary lighting of the Olympic torch, an amazing fireworks show brightened the night sky with the event reaching its conclusion.

"A spectacular collection of fireworks that went off in just many minutes," said Brooke. "One person commented to me, 'I think that’s why we had a lousy fireworks display in my hometown. They sent all the fireworks to Sochi.' They just went on and on and on lighting up the Black Sea skyscape here. Really spectacular.”

Security issues

On the security front Friday, International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said it is unfair to single out the Sochi Games as facing a particular threat.

"You can maybe not imagine how many threats there were on each of the Games before. We had threats on Sydney, we had threats on Athens. Maybe you remember the situation in Salt Lake City. There were many [threats], so you cannot single out these Games in this way," said Bach.

Russian security forces are on high alert following threats by Islamic extremists to carry out attacks and disrupt the Games.

Analysts have warned of possible attacks against soft targets, such as train stations and other areas where civilians congregate.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Laisie from: Canada
February 08, 2014 4:37 PM
I don't know why we are not able to see the opening ceremony it has been taken down in youtube and other sides I would have love to see the ceremony all you can find is the the one olympic ring not working. Give me a break one of our pillar on the Canadian winter games did not work and it was not the end of the world is not fare that the ceremony is not freely available this games are being shadow by bad publicity

In Response

by: Suzie Barlette from: United States
February 13, 2014 4:44 PM
I must agree. It seems like the U.S. is nit-picking for the negatives of Sochi. This I am ashamed of for my beloved country.


by: windson from: china
February 08, 2014 7:25 AM
America is a great country,but sometimes a little bit paranoid.At this moment that all celebrate,politics should be set aside.Generosities would make the America even more great!God bless sochi! God bless all of us!

In Response

by: Suzie Barlette from: United States
February 13, 2014 4:42 PM
I love the country I am from, and very proud of it. And yet, I agree that politics should not be the matter in everything. If America sees Russia as a threat, media will do nothing to stop it. The only thing that can change is how we, the citizens as well as others around us, understand what is truly happening...for Russia is a great country. There is a reason why Sochi was chosen for this years Olympics, do not defy the reasonings of the committee.


by: Suzy Hall from: Cincinnati, Ohio
February 08, 2014 1:40 AM
I wish Matt and Meredith would shut up! Take a breath now and then for God's sake!


by: Anonymous
February 08, 2014 1:37 AM
russians pretty tacky

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