News / Africa

Soul-Retrieving Shaman - On the Side of South Africa's Angels

Katharine Lee believes she once returned to a previous life as a Native American where she learned the rituals she now practices in Johannesburg. (Photo by Darren Taylor)
Katharine Lee believes she once returned to a previous life as a Native American where she learned the rituals she now practices in Johannesburg. (Photo by Darren Taylor)
Darren Taylor
As an 18-year-old nurse, Katharine Lee, now 67, started “living it up, smoking and drinking and partying,” and the previously “naïve Christian girl who wanted to serve God with all her being,” became an atheist. 
 
“I had lived in a very sheltered environment. Suddenly I was ejected into this harsh world of pain and suffering. I just could not reconcile a God of love with seeing little babies dying of cancer, innocent people mutilated in car accidents, and all the atrocities,” she explained.
 
One night she returned to her parent’s home in Johannesburg.
 
“They were having a séance. The lights went off and everybody started singing hymns and praying,” she remembered. “I thought, ‘This is great!’”
 
But instead of being “titillated by spooks” and “tables jumping around the room,” something then occurred to transform Lee’s life.
 
“I felt this incredible power and love overshadow me. I had no control over my body. I felt my body get up out of the chair. Some force moved me across the room to where my mom was sitting. I did not know at the time that she had a bad migraine headache. I felt my hands being placed on her head and this strange energy pulsating through my body, this love, into my mother.
 
“She’d been plagued with very bad migraines all her life. And she said when my hands were laid on her head the power working through me had healed her instantly. And she never had a migraine after that [ever again].”
 
Darren Taylor's conversation with a shaman
Darren Taylor's conversation with a shamani
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For decades Lee worked as a spiritual healer, healing people by placing her hands on them. She was also clairvoyant, possessing the ability to “perceive” events before they happened.  
 
Past life as North American Indian 
 
Another significant step on Lee’s path to “spiritual awakening” happened about 15 years ago. While visiting the coastal city of Port Elizabeth, an “inexplicable force” pulled her to Hogsback, a town in the mountains of the Eastern Cape region.
 
“A friend and I, Mary, booked into a guesthouse there. We were having supper and as I put the last spoon of food into my mouth, it was as though a bolt of lightning hit me, and the room began to spin. I was in great pain,” Lee recalled.
 
She retreated to her room, where she was joined by the concerned owner of the lodge – a woman named Dawn – who began to massage her sore shoulder.
 
“As she did that, I started to sob, and I kept telling her: ‘I am so sorry; please forgive me.’ But I’d never met her before! Then spontaneously we all regressed to a previous life, where we’d lived together in various roles in the same [ancient] Native American [Indian] settlement.
 
“Dawn transformed into Grey Wolf – my teacher in a Native American incarnation, and she had the pelt of a grey wolf on her head. And Mary changed into the tribe’s water gatherer. 
 
“I said to Dawn: ‘What did I do; what did I do?’ And she said to me: ‘The chief says you broke your vow of celibacy.’
 
“On that journey into the past village elders told me from the day I was born in that incarnation, I had been chosen to become the village’s medicine woman, or shaman. In my late teens I had a final initiation to go when I fell in love with someone and lost my virginity (tribal law dictated that shaman’s remain virgins). Because of that I was cast out of the village and never fulfilled my role to heal the people of the village.”
 
Traumatic soul loss
 
Lee said on her regression into her past life she “relived” all the shamanic rituals she’d experienced as a North American Indian many centuries ago.
 
“All my different gifts were once again revitalized and came back to life and I was reenergized and my vibrations were heightened, and I suddenly recalled all the shamanic things I had been taught how to do.”
 
Within a matter of minutes, Lee was a shaman.
 
“A shaman has the ability to leave their body at will and [their soul] journeys into the upper, the middle or the lower worlds, in search of the lost aspect of a person’s soul, to find it, to heal it, to retrieve it, to bring it back and to reintegrate it back into the person who’s suffering from soul loss,” she told VOA.
 
Explaining “soul loss,” Lee said some people endure experiences that are “far too traumatic to handle, and so an aspect of the soul goes into hiding. An example would be someone who’s been sexually abused as a child, or someone who’s been the victim of a terrible crime, or someone who’s made a big mistake in the past that’s haunted the person his or her whole life, someone’s parent might have committed suicide…”
 
Such a traumatized person, she said, typically feels loss of identity, depression, insomnia and “strange symptoms for which there’s no medical cure.”
 
The only cure, Lee maintained, lies buried deep in a person’s past – or even in a person’s past life, as far back as many thousands of years ago.
 
The shamanic journey
 
To allow her or her client’s soul to transcend the present physical world and to journey spiritually into the past, she sits alongside them and links with them “mentally and physically.”
 
Lee emphasized: “If I pick up that they’ve suffered great trauma in the past, I journey on their behalf.”
 
She plays a CD of music containing highly rhythmic drumming, and instruments such as rattles and didgeridoos.   
 
“It helps to get you into a trance state, in order to journey for that person… or to help them achieve a different state of consciousness, an altered state of awareness…”  
 
During this trance, Lee experiences “sensations” and “flashes” that allow her to see into a person’s past, including into previous lives that the person’s soul might have lived.
 
“When I move into an altered state of consciousness and my soul leaves my body, I move along that person’s timeline in the past, searching for the person’s past soul,” she explained.  
 
On a shamanic journey, several “compassionate allies” guide her to retrieve the damaged parts of people’s souls.
 
“They can take the form of various spirit helpers, which come from God. So it could be guardian angels, it could be [deceased] loved ones in spirit who still care very much about the person you’re dealing with. It could be that person’s guardian angel who’s been with them from birth. It could be legions of angels, depending on where that soul has landed up.”
 
Lee continued that on particularly difficult journeys, with lots of trauma involved and with the possibility of her soul being confronted by evil forces, she invokes the “highest of the most high” and assorted “ascended masters” for protection.  
 
“We’re talking about Jesus, we’re talking about Buddha, we’re talking about Muhammad; we’re talking about the Virgin Mary. We’re talking about all the masters that the different religions know and serve… That’s quite a strong force to have backing you,” Lee stated, smiling.  
 
She added that when she does this, her clients describe feeling hands on their bodies, “hands of healing, hands of love, as though they’re just surrounded by this incredible love that holds them, that cradles them, that works on them throughout the session.”
 
Trapped soul  
 
Lee’s been on plenty of “amazing” shamanic journeys, including one with a man who was suffering severely from asthma.   
 
“Our souls journeyed down into a cave, and we seemed to be walking forever along underground tunnels, trying to find the lost aspect of his soul. And because the journey went on forever I realized that this must have happened a long, long time ago.
 
“We kept on moving back, back in time. Eventually, I heard a faint voice calling: ‘I’m here, I’m here.’ We came to an opening in the ground, like a well. And as we looked over we could see him as a young boy, lying trapped under a pile of stones.
 
“My guides and I really struggled to free that part of his soul, to bring him up to the surface, to encourage him to breathe…”
 
“Eventually we brought him up to a safe place where other shamanic healers were gathered. There we performed a healing and a reintegration of soul, where I blew the healed aspect back into his heart center and his crown [brain] center.
 
“It came out on that journey that in a previous life he as a child had fallen into a well and had died through drowning, and nobody had ever found him. And this person explained that in this life he always suffered from claustrophobia [and asthma], and had a terrible fear of water and would never go swimming.” 
 
However, said Lee, after the soul retrieval session the man never again suffered from asthma and claustrophobia, and began to swim.
 
“So the trauma he had suffered in a past life was trapped in his soul’s memory bank and had negative consequences on his present life,” she said.
 
Abortion trauma
 
A woman consulted Lee, severely depressed after having endured the deaths of many close relatives in her life.   
 
“We both thought that’s where her soul loss occurred. But it actually had nothing to do with that,” said Lee.  
 
“When I started to journey for her, I saw what looked like a long rope. I followed this rope, which began to look more and more like an umbilical cord. I followed it until I got to a young lady, holding a little baby and rocking it. I recognized that this baby was the part of this woman’s soul that was missing, so I reintegrated it back into her.”
 
Then she told her client what she’d seen on the journey.
 
“This particular lady was well into her 50s, and she said: ‘Good grief.’ [She told me that] early in her 20s she fell pregnant. She had very, very high blood pressure and in order to save her life, they had to terminate the pregnancy, and she never fell pregnant again. So she grieved for that baby all her life, without realizing that she was experiencing soul loss as a result of that.”  
 
Soul travels to heaven  
 
Sometimes, said Lee, her soul travels to what she called the “Upper World.”
 
“A child may have been severely abused. And during that time an aspect of soul may have decided they would far rather go and live in the Upper World. That’s the world of angels, where everything is beautiful and perfect; some people call it heaven.”      
 
She continued: “It’s more about feeling, than anything else. It really is a beautiful, special place where one feels this amazing peace, safety and serenity.”
 
When her soul is in the Upper World, said Lee, the atmosphere in her “healing room” changes dramatically.  
 
“It’s almost a celestial feeling and [the clients’] features change… It’s just absolutely awesome,” she commented.
 
Lee added that it’s usually a “huge battle” to persuade the relevant part of the soul to return to the real and present world.
 
“A lot of them, understandably, don’t want to come back from a place of perfection.”
 
Satanic danger 
 
Lee stressed that soul retrieval is not a game played by “crackpot pseudo spiritualists.”
 
“You have to know what you’re doing when you do this work. Sometimes the work can be very dangerous, depending on where that soul has gone – because souls can be stolen.”
 
She explained: “Unfortunately, I sometimes come across clients who have been involved in Satanism.  I can see it and know it and feel it immediately, without them saying a word about it.
 
“Because if you’re a clairvoyant, and a [spiritual] healer, the minute someone [who’s a Satanist] walks through the door, it’s like they’re covered by a black cloud of [evil] energy, and you can feel the energy as they approach. If they phone you, you can hear it in their voice. And you know if you want to get involved [with them] or you don’t.”
 
The Satanists want Lee to retrieve and heal the parts of their souls that they’ve surrendered to Satan. For her, that involves a transcendental journey of her soul into the Lower World – otherwise known as hell. 
 
“And you need to ask yourself if you’re strong enough spiritually to do a soul retrieval for that person, because there’s danger involved. There is physical danger in that your soul might get lost. Your soul might be taken [by Satan] in your attempt to retrieve that [corrupted aspect of] soul,” she said.  
 
But Lee emphasized that this is rare.
 
“If you know what you’re doing, and you’re an experienced soul retrieval practitioner, and you have the help of the ascended masters and the angels, you will usually overcome the darkness.”
 
God’s channel 
 
After Lee’s successfully healed and retrieved a damaged, lost part of a client’s soul, she said some client’s feel “nothing.”
 
“And then three months later they contact me and say: ‘Wow! My whole life has turned around.’ Other people feel an incredible sense of relief, some people feel comforted; some people feel a whole lot lighter. A lot of people tell me that all their guilt feelings are gone. I’d say 85 percent come back with a positive response, that in one way or another their lives have changed for the better,” she maintained.
 
Lee describes herself as a “channel for God,” and said she’ll continue waging her war as a shaman against evil and soul loss for as long as she’s able.

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