News / Asia

Source: S. China Sea Calmer Now

A Vietnamese Coast Guard ship in the South China Sea, May 18, 2014. (PhoBolsaTV.com)
A Vietnamese Coast Guard ship in the South China Sea, May 18, 2014. (PhoBolsaTV.com)
A U.S. based journalist who recently visited the South China Sea says he believes the current situation near China’s disputed oil rig has calmed down.

Vu Hoang Lan, founder of California-based PhoBolsaTV, recently visited the area on board Vietnamese ships. He said in an interview with VOA's Vietnamese Service that Hanoi is using conflict-avoidance tactics when] confronting Chinese ships.

"The Vietnamese people that I spoke with, fishermen and law-enforcement personnel, they are very upset [by Chinese policies] because they have to give up and run away within their own territory when being chased by Chinese forces. Nevertheless, they have no other choices given Hanoi’s policies," said Lan.
A Vietnamese fisherman repairs his vessel after it was rammed by a Chinese patrol ship that it protecting the waters around a disputed oil rig in the South China Sea, May 18, 2014. (PhoBolsaTV.com)A Vietnamese fisherman repairs his vessel after it was rammed by a Chinese patrol ship that it protecting the waters around a disputed oil rig in the South China Sea, May 18, 2014. (PhoBolsaTV.com)
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A Vietnamese fisherman repairs his vessel after it was rammed by a Chinese patrol ship that it protecting the waters around a disputed oil rig in the South China Sea, May 18, 2014. (PhoBolsaTV.com)
A Vietnamese fisherman repairs his vessel after it was rammed by a Chinese patrol ship that it protecting the waters around a disputed oil rig in the South China Sea, May 18, 2014. (PhoBolsaTV.com)
 
At the beginning of the dispute, the two sides exchanged water cannon fire and Hanoi accused the Chinese vessels of ramming Vietnamese ships.

However, Lan said Vietnam still sends ships to the area every day and uses loud speakers to ask China to remove the oil rig from its waters.

He says that Chinese vessels respond by using loud speakers telling them to leave the area or face consequences.

“There’s no indication that China would compromise on this. Vietnam can do nothing more, can’t take up military measures, which China is expecting most, and Vietnam won’t let China have that ‘opportunity’," said Lan.

On May 1, Beijing moved the oil rig to an area near the Paracel Islands, within an area that Vietnam considers its exclusive economic zone.

This report was produced in collaboration with the VOA Vietnamese service.

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by: Kim Dung from: Saigon
May 27, 2014 10:35 AM
This is not an opinion piece, this professional reporter is simply reporting news. There are reports that you may like and there are reports that you may not like. This reporter is not a mouthpiece of the government of Vietnam.

by: xindu from: Chengdu China
May 27, 2014 9:25 AM
I think this report is great. it's real and fair.it doesn't' support any side,whether China or Vietnam.for example, it says" ... the sides exchange water cannon fire and Hanoi...'' and ''Vietnam uses loud speaker to ask China to remove the oil rig from its waters''and ''Chinese vessels respond by using loud speakers telling them to leave the area or face consequences.'' and at last,it says ''On May 1, Beijing moved the oil rig to an area near the Parcel Islands, within an area that Vietnam considers its exclusive economic zone.''.

From this report,we know it's Vietnam first set up the oil rig at this disputed area and China didn't set up oil rig until May 1, 2014. China had peacefully told Vietnam many times to solve the contentious problem but Vietnam think China is wimpy. China and Vietnam should keep peace to figure out long term strategy for the both countries because they had a long time friendly relationship. .Laying down dispute and sharing the resources exploiting, I think this is a good way for both China and Vietnam. Thanks VOA for this kind of articles for the Asia peace for the world peace.






by: John Nguyen from: VN
May 26, 2014 2:26 PM
This contents of the English version has been distorted with the contents interview with journalist Hoang Vu Lan by Vietnamese language.

by: smilingstone from: Vn
May 26, 2014 12:33 PM
What a liar you are, the writer! if you love vietnam, love your countrymen, don't write such things!!!
Vietnamese people are not a bunch of wimps. I believe neither Chinese nor Vietnamese people like war! Vietnam is a peaceful and beautiful country. We don't expect any aggressive one to violate our world. But throughout the history, Vietnamese patriots have always driven the invaders out of the country!!!

by: Preci from: The West
May 26, 2014 10:24 AM
According to new information received from Vietnam , at 16:00 AM on May 26th, the Chinese fishing boat number 11209 collided to sink the DNa 90152, a Vietnamese fishing boat in the SouthWest of Haiyang Shiyou-981 and at 17 miles from this rig. Vietnameses call it their traditional fishing ground, within the Exclusive Economic Zone and continental shelf of Vietnam. 10 other Da Nang fishermen of Vietnam were salvaged and rescued safely. At the time of the incident, there were 40 Chinese fishing boats surrounded a group of Vietnamese fishing boats. /.

by: Dung from: Seattle
May 25, 2014 1:02 AM
Please don't believe any news about Vietnam from US-based Vietnamese news agencies. These people from the South Vietnam-the old government. They hate the current government. They try to stir hate in Vietnamese people to overthrow the current government. They lies a lot. I live in Seattle but I don't trust news from those agencies. They are not helping the situation.
International news agencies, please go to witness and write your own article. That will be more objective.
Thanks.

by: Erecca from: Florida
May 24, 2014 10:32 PM
Who wrote this article absolutely doesn't know anything, she just try to speak bad about Vietnamese Government. You are Vietnamese , why don't you help your native country, you just manipulate people.

by: Phan from: USA
May 24, 2014 6:54 PM
I don't know which source is correct and the Vietnam still convince China oil rig to remove while Chinese boats ramping Vietnam's boats.

by: The real plot from: US
May 24, 2014 2:54 PM
Hanoi government manipulated the country into protests and stirred up nationalistic fervor to help them extort China of money for drilling rights. Vietnamese living abroad were also fooled. Hanoi only pretends to care for Vietnam when it comes to their communist party's interests. China is clearly the "violator" but Hanoi keeps quiet when they're being shown money. Communists are just being themselves.
In Response

by: Nguoi thu 8 from: US
May 25, 2014 1:14 AM
@ The real plot, you are absolutely right. That's what I thought too. After the deal done, people of VN will hear VN and China mutual agree to share the resources. So the communists regime will get more money for themselves and all Vietnamese are still slaves to server them. Remember VN must pay the debts they borrowed for the war to invade S. VN. I see next is the VN just a part of China forever. Who betrays motherland? Communists.

by: domo from: US
May 24, 2014 11:10 AM
The author haven't get a chance to see everything. The Vietnamese are not backing off but rather approaching closer (3-4 knots) within the rigs. The Chinese have withdrawn some of their boats and seems to back off the confrontations a little more. The situation haven't change much but did calm down a little than the weeks before.
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