News / Asia

S. Korea Issues Warning to North Against Nuclear Test

Anti-North Korea civic group hold signs and chant slogans during a rally denouncing North Korea's possible nuclear test plan in Seoul, January 31, 2013.
Anti-North Korea civic group hold signs and chant slogans during a rally denouncing North Korea's possible nuclear test plan in Seoul, January 31, 2013.
— South Korea is issuing its sternest warning yet to North Korea not to conduct another nuclear test, which some officials in Seoul and Washington say may be imminent.

After South Korean President Lee Myung-bak convened a meeting of his top national security officials Thursday, his government warned North Korea it faces harsh punishment should it go ahead with a nuclear test.

In a statement, presidential spokesman Park Jeong-ha warned Pyongyang of “very grave consequences” unless it immediately halts “all provocative words and actions” and complies with international obligations.

That sentiment was echoed hours later by foreign ministry spokesman Cho Tai-young.

Cho confirms the government issued a “grave warning” at the meeting of foreign affairs and security ministers. The spokesman says Seoul insists Pyongyang “move towards de-nuclearization on the Korean peninsula, as they have promised” and Pyongyang “must bear in mind that only isolation is waiting” if it continues such provocations.

North Korea conducted nuclear tests in 2006 and 2009. It has also carried out long-range rocket launches that the international community has condemned as thinly disguised inter-continental ballistic missile tests.

For those actions, the United Nations Security Council has imposed sanctions on the reclusive and impoverished state.

Pyongyang recently warned it would continue with rocket launches and carry out a third nuclear test of a “higher level” that it contends will be aimed at its declared "arch enemy," the United States.

In Thursday's security meeting in Seoul, officials say President Lee instructed his defense minister to maintain strong military readiness in response to escalating tensions on the peninsula.

South Korean officials are not saying what sort of grave consequences the North could face or whether that could include military action.

Next month, South Korea takes the rotating presidency of the United Nations Security Council. That will allow it to convene meetings of the council at any time, something now considered a certainty should there be a North Korean nuclear test.

The two Koreas do not have a diplomatic relationship. They have technically remained in a state of war since a 1953 armistice brought to a pause three years of devastating civil conflict. The war also involved the Chinese on the North Korean side and the United States, backed by U.N. forces, on the South Korean side.

Military and intelligence officials in Seoul and Washington differ on assessments of North Korea's nuclear weapons development. The country is believed to have a few plutonium-fueled bombs and has revealed a facility it says is enriching uranium.

However, the general consensus is North Korea is still some years away from being able to make a warhead small and light enough to place atop an intercontinental ballistic missile.

Steve Herman

A veteran journalist, Steven L Herman is the Voice of America Asia correspondent.

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by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
January 31, 2013 2:01 PM
South Korea faces a reality that is not changing for the better. SKorea needs to ensure that its population is well protected from any irrational actions/attack from NK. So far NK continues to make decisions, that when viewd from a democratic perspective, are irrational; there are no signs that this perception will change. No ifs and buts,SKorea needs to ensure it has very well developed/implemented civil defense measures/programs/infrastructure in place, and that its people are also well versed in all aspects of self protection/ self-preservation. Additionally, it needs to maintain a competent standing, credible deterrent force; and an equally competent and credible reserve force. It is unfortunate, but the NKorean leadership is not at all predictable, thus the situation is very dangerous.


by: L2
January 31, 2013 6:58 AM
Even though, US, France, and China are a part of NTP


by: L2
January 31, 2013 6:53 AM
Don't the US have Nuc? Don't the Frace have Nuc? Don't the China have Nuc? So Why can't NK have a Nuc? (Not that NK should have a Nuc)
THERE IS A PROBLEM

In Response

by: wizardteo from: batu pahat
January 31, 2013 11:25 AM
the problem is rational and cooperative, law by laws, you feel safe and allow a policemen having weapon and walk past you but how you feel when someone not police had their weapon and walk toward you?

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